Do You Know What A Yellow Ribbon Tied On A Dog’s Collar Means?

SHARE to spread the word!

You are out in the park with your family, playing, running, maybe even having a picnic.  Perhaps your dog is with you; however, off in the distance you see adorable dog approaching with their handler and your children immediately begin to run towards this adorable dog.  As the dog is getting closer, you see a yellow ribbon tied on the dog’s collar.  What goes through your mind?

The Yellow Dog Project

Photo courtesy AniCareVets

A yellow ribbon around a dog’s collar is to help children identify that you need to proceed with caution. The dog may not be child friendly, may have fear or anxiety issues, or may be overly excited.  Either way, caution should be applied when approaching.

The Yellow Dog Project is a nonprofit organization that is a global effort to help raise awareness and education around dogs that require a little extra distance upon approaching.  Does this mean that the dog is aggressive or mean?  No, there are numerous reasons why a dog may have a yellow ribbon. It may mean the dog is new with the handler, is under medical care, or in foster care for instance.

The purpose of this project is to assist with the proper techniques to approach a dog. Children have a lot of energy and often to run up and pet a dog. Not all dogs understand this and can become fearful.  With proper education, all parties are put in a less stressful environment, which in turn reduces opportunities for an unforeseen accident.

For more information about this wonderful cause, please visit: The Yellow Dog Facebook page.  Learn how to educate family, friends, colleagues, and yourself.  When there is knowledge, there is understanding.

Have you ever seen a dog wearing a yellow ribbon?  Did you know what it meant prior to this article? Do you have a dog that may need to wear a yellow ribbon?

Please SHARE to help spread the word!

Did you like this?

LIKE us for more great content!



  • Pattie Moscariello Mayette

    this was very informational. Prior to this articial I didn’t know about this. now I know to procecede with caution if a dog is wearing a yellow ribbon

  • JJ1964

    I never heard of the yellow ribbon on a dog. I might try it. I have a rescue dog that gets nervous around strangers until we say everything is ok. Then she is sweet as can be

    • clsimps68

      My rescue dog is the same way. he is also very protective of me so that adds to his nervousness.

      • Karen

        Your dog doesn’t see you as his leader and this creates the nervousness and anxiety. When your dog can trust that you are the leader and in charge, he can relax knowing he doesn’t have to defend himself and you. People make excuses of “he was abused”, “he’s a rescue”, “he’s from a puppy mill”, etc. but all these dogs can be very quickly turned around with structure, structure, structure, strong leadership, and plenty of structure exercise. Be aggressive when there is absolutely no threat is not being “protective” and dogs should protect only as a last resort.

        • Mikey 444

          sorry to tell you…but that doesn’t apply to newly rescued dogs who were abused. It can take years for an abused dog to trust humans and sometimes they never get over it. They will love and respect you…but may not like others, especially someone with a low voice since most abusers are male.

          • Karen

            It does apply to newly rescued dogs. I’m fostering a dog that’s been in the shelter for at least two years. She’s fear aggressive and can’t be around other dogs and she’s bitten several people (who knows what happened to her; I don’t care because it’s doesn’t matter). She charged and went after me from the other side of a room and kept a sustained attack with several leaps towards my face before she finally stood trembling and snarling. She repeatedly tried to attack my small dog. The first few days of walking were extremely trying and traumatic for her, with her tail clamped, ears pinned, and slinking along looking left and right and any loud truck going by, or car door slamming, sent her into a “fit”. Right at two weeks later, she runs and plays with my dogs (not strange dogs *yet*) can be walked down a crowded avenue, has been to the office, ridden in an elevator, can ride in the car, has been in stores,petted by strangers, knows “heel”, “sit”, “down”, “wait”, and “stay”. We had a little bit of regression yesterday, which was to be expected, but in another two weeks, you will never know the dog had a problem. The last foster I took in had been in the shelter several months with issues (not as severe as this one) and is now in a happy home. The problem people have is they try to “love” the dog out of their issues – they coddle, baby, coo, treat, beg, plead, and make excuses but this isn’t what the dog needs. This current dog got ZERO affection the first week; I barely spoke to her except to give her commands. No treats. No making out with her. No “poor baby”. She’s in freakin’ boot camp. But now she’s relaxed and happy, wags her tail like crazy when I go in to get her out of the crate, and happily allows strangers to pet her. She sleeps soundly. She can do downstays for up to an hour.

            What happened in a dogs past is irrelevant; dogs live in the moment. They only remain “victims” if treated as such. A previous dog I had in the 80s had been so severely abused by his male owner that when I got him, he would defecate and urinate all over himself the minute a male approached him. It took him about 6 weeks to get over it. Top trainers rehabilitate these types of dogs all the time, and pretty quickly.

          • Sab W.

            The dominance theory has been scientifically proven to be FALSE. I won’t post links here but please read up on the new research. The theory was based on wolves interacting with other wolves. The only way the dominance theory would apply to the relationship between humans and dogs is if there were a pack of feral dogs co-habitating with a group of feral humans.

          • Karen

            I don’t talk “theory”, I just train the dogs. The dogs I train are relaxed, happy, secure, and reliable in all situations. And it doesn’t take me months to accomplish it. But you keep reading…

          • Carlie Lamiroy

            You can be a dog’s leader without being the “pack leader”. Dogs don’t see people as being part of their “pack”, but that doesn’t mean that the human shouldn’t take the role of “leader”. It sounds like you provide structure and consistency, and rather than food the reward you use is affection (it sounds like you withhold it until the dog has “earned” it, correct?). I wish people like you understood that training with positive reinforcement is not “coddling” the dog, and doesn’t mean not setting boundaries or limits. And it doesn’t always take months, either – that depends a lot on the dog and the issue. It’s about understanding what motivates the dog, whether it’s food, toys, attention, whatever, and using that to reinforce behaviors that you want, and in the event of behaviors that you don’t want, getting creative and coming up with alternate, acceptable behaviors that are incompatible with the old behavior that you can reinforce instead (ie, sitting to greet a new person rather than jumping on them). More difficult behaviors can take longer, but scientifically it’s been proven that modifying a dog’s behavior using classical conditioning and positive reinforcement is more likely to stick with the dog permanently, and is also less likely to have undesired side effects.
            I work in an animal shelter, and work with dogs with behavioral problems for a living. We usually only have a matter of a couple of weeks to turn a dog’s behavior around before being in the shelter environment starts exacerbating the problem. I have seen behavior modification using positive reinforcement and classical conditioning work on hundreds with everything from resource guarding, to fear, to body handling issues, to dog/dog reactivity. So before you’re so disparaging about it, maybe you should try working with a trainer who is truly well-versed in the methodology and science behind these techniques.

          • Russel Vaspol

            Carlie you are another no nothing person just putting in an opinion

            with no actual knowledge of what you are talking about. It is best to be the alpha male or female to train and lead your dog. This will always make it easier to control with just verbal command, Most dogs will respond to their masters voice and yes they do understand what you are saying.. A dog will follow what the alpha leader is responding to. If you are calm so is your dog.. I will never own a dog that is not obedient, and trusting.

          • Jess

            You should probably learn the difference between the words “no” and “know” before you attempt to assert your intelligence.

          • Carlie Lamiroy

            My opinion is backed by all of the latest scientific reasearch and shared by thr American Society of Pet Dog Trainers as well as the American Veterinary Society for Animal Behavior, not to mention years of working in an animal shelter with a behavior modification program that uses positive methods and NO dominance to rehab everything from fear to resource guarding. What do you have to back YOUR opinion?

            Dogs benefit from leadership, structure, and consistency. Dominance has nothing to do with it.

          • Navybrat

            Russel, Your comment alone exhibits your ignorance. Your terminology speaks volumes.

          • tiredofthebs

            My husband is the Pack Leader of our 3 dogs and they definitely follow him and view him with the utmost respect. My husband has learned everything that he does by watching Cesar Milan on the Dog Whisperer. It is not hard. Consistency and showing the dog that you are the leader is key.

          • Heather Pettit

            Reliable, except for periods of regression, as you listed above. I think too many people here are giving you a hard time over nothing but to assume that ANY dog is reliable 100% of the time is ignorant. I know I will catch some flak for saying that, but it’s the truth. While many dogs go through a lifetime without any major, notable incidents, it’s not safe to assume that will be the case. Every situation, every interaction is new and different. We do what we can to prepare our animals but there is never a guarantee. Once people realize this, they will begin to train their CHILDREN to respect that fact. My son has known the appropriate way to interact with strange dogs since he could walk. He does not approach them unless the owner and I agree to it, and he feels confident doing so. When he does interact, he doesn’t reach. He lets the dog smell him and approach if they’re comfortable. More parents need to monitor their children and teach them in this way. With laws like they are, it may be the dog paying the ultimate price for a human’s provocation.

          • Tommy Turek

            More parents should be like you my dog is very kid friendly so I don’t care if one runs up to her but I would rather the kid ask first the the parent agree but the worst is the parents who drag there kids away from your dog like it’s going to kill them you should teach kids at an early age how to act around dogs or any animal or they will always be afraid or get bitten.

          • Heather Pettit

            Definitely! It’s understandable that some people opt out of having dogs, for fear or dislike, but they shouldn’t restrict their children from learning about and experiencing proper pet etiquette. I absolutely agree.

          • Karen

            Agreed Heather and that is why this dog, when she’s ready to be placed (and that won’t be until I’m confident she will have no issues in a new home) will NOT go to a home with children, or first time dog owners, no matter how safe I *think* she is. She will need an experienced owner that is comfortable in the leadership position and will commit to her daily exercise needs (meaning not just a leisurely stroll around the neighborhood).

          • Angela Chaisson

            How can you be “confident she will have no issues in a new home” – it would be a totally different situation from your home and different people – hopefully ones who truly want to provide a good home. And if you are so sure she would have no issues, why would she need an experienced owner? That makes absolutely no sense.

          • Bill Price

            yes beat your kids ty so much >)

          • Angela Chaisson

            I taught my kids the same thing. But the overwhelmingly negative response to Karen’s posts is understandable. She’s not presenting her opinion and participating in a discussion like a mature adult. She is insulting others for holding opinions different from hers. There is always a lot to be learned from others. Unfortunately, she doesn’t seem to know that.

          • Carlie Lamiroy

            The theory was actually based on wolves interacting with other wolves, in CAPTIVITY. Dominance theory doesn’t even apply to actual wolves! And even if it did, using it with dogs is sort of like using techniques that work with chimpanzees with human children; genetically, they’re very similar, but there are thousands of years of evolution separating them.

          • Tommy Turek

            Haved you ever owned a dog,I got my first dog when I was 25 still living with my parents and I never feed my dog at the table and we always waited till my father got home to eat so I would feed my dog after we finished eating then one night I put her food down and she didn’t eat it and I saw my father still sitting at the table the minute he got up my dog started to eat so she looked at him as the leader but she always stayed with me and listened to me so don’t say that dogs don’t act like wolves have you ever watched a show about wolves they act just like dogs my dog did the same things the wolves did so years of evolution didn’t separate them.

          • OP EN

            I think a key thing people need to think realize is that we are all just throwing the word “DOG” around like that covers all of them. Different breeds act in different ways, as do different up-bringings and ways to raise a dog. I’m not a pro or anything but have owned many types of animals. I think I have enough experience to say that no dog is the same. Animals are just as versatile as people, (you don’t lump all abused children cases together and give them a generic 12 step recovery program) so while some may react to training or rescuing in one way, I would never except another dog to do the same. Each animal’s background and mentality should be taken into great consideration when training, socializing, and selecting for a home..

          • Allison Woods

            That is one goddamned long runon sentence.

          • Tommy Turek

            Your one goddamned ignorant ass nobody told you to read it.

          • loreebee

            And, the thing they always forget with the “dominance theory” is that submission is FREELY GIVEN. It is never demanded. Epic fail.

          • tiredofthebs

            I beg to differ with you. We have 3 dogs and our 1 dog (our first) is definitely the Alpha dog.

          • Mistakenmass

            I’ve read that- that’s BS! There’s a pecking order in dogs just like there is in human beings! Call it what you want there will always be leaders and followers-if you want to follow your dogs lead and not learn to be in charge just keep it at home!

          • sweetone100percent

            You are so full of it, amazingly so. First, if a dog was that abused, the odds of you FIXING the problem that quickly, are nil to none, unless you were God, himself. Animals like that are not ignored into submission, anymore than a pack animal is bitten into submission. Amazing what some of you folks will claim to know. They can remain victims for years, long after the abuse, regardless of the treatment given, and if you knew anything concerning the psychiatric

            background of a dog, you would know that animals experience the same sensations, even ptsd, with said flashbacks included. They’ve done numerous studies on this in the vet field, so I’m surprised you don’t know that. Look up Dr Becker and you will see what I mean.

          • Karen

            Are they asking the dogs that?

          • sweetone100percent

            No Karen, they don’t need to ASK them, Ms Sarcastic. They base it on lab results and reactions…something I’m sure you know little of, since you’ve been claiming all sorts of ridiculous stuff concerning training them. Had you actually dealt with them, on a professional level, maybe you would have known that.

          • tiredofthebs

            Haven’t you ever heard of Cesar Milan? It does not take that much time. Consistency and using the right techniques are the key.

          • Karen

            Can you do this with your methods?
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXZxsuMV8X4
            Pay particular attention to the words at 4:43 and 9:50
            One week later:
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AiMUGAELhzE

          • Scott Therrien

            the dog sure did a great job with in a week

          • Crystal

            It sounds like the dog Karen is working with currently was not abused as much as poorly socialized, then dumped by an owner at the pound (likely when they got a new puppy after never bothering to train their animal to tolerate other dogs) and no one had time to retrain her until now.

          • Karen

            Yes, that’s exactly it! Approximately a 1000 dogs adopted and/or fostered during the time she’s been in a shelter but I’m the first one that’s “had time” to train her! When they asked me to take her, that’s what they said, “oh, nobody else *has time*”. http://www.fortunatek9.com/Articles/The_Abuse_Excuse_Julia_V_McDonough.pdf

          • joe harris

            jus’ curious sweetone100percent, what is yer professional experience with dogs, trainin’, rescue, rehabilitation? not an attack, jus’ a simple question for i see ya discrediting some pretty reasonable and valid points.

          • Tony Bifulco

            JOE, Ive saved 5 dogs, 3 of which where abused and i can tell YOU everyone of them had/has a different personality, what KAREN doesnt seem to get is that this isnt something that comes with blueprints or a “standard” plan of action and she sure as HELL doesnt have all the answers, certainly not enough to talk down to ANYONE like shes any better at this than anyone else….Is that a valid enough point?

          • Ruth Dilger Williams

            Pack mentality does use Alpha/Omega behavior to define its place in the pack – just for clarification and does involve a little ruckus and biting with the submissive on the floor belly up. Not taking sides here – just helping to define I think what you meant.

            Personally for me? I don’t have the skill to handle dog aggression. Once I know a dog is a biter I will never 100% trust that dog and it transfers to the animal. My hat is off to people who can do this. And I used to work with a dog warden.

          • Justin Williams

            Understanding and compassion is love. How is her love for dogs any different than your love for dogs. You can both agree you love dogs.

          • Bev Mabry

            glad you’ve had success – but your experience is certainly not relevant to “ALL” gods. it sounds like you have a knack for training dogs, but not everyone else does, and not every dog will respond quickly or the same as another dog.

          • Holly

            Karen you are full of crap., so what you are saying is you are god and can train even the most abused dog??? you have a wonderful imagination, not all dogs will accept others as they will their new family, I work with a rescue organization, and if you can do that then you should be a millionaire by now, funny I have never heard of you, and why do you not have your own TV showing everyone how amazing you are, YES!!! I am sarcastic cause I don’t buy your BS

          • Karen

            I don’t give a rat’s A$$ if you believe me or not. You may not believe me but there are dozens of top trainers rehabilitating abused dogs, often dogs that multiple other trainers have said couldn’t be helped. I really only know one that has a tv show and that’s Cesar Milan, although I’ve never seen one of his programs. Most people don’t *want* to rehabilitate them – they like the attention that comes with their “abused” dog. They like to constantly make excuses for their dog’s behavior and let everyone know it was “abused” and what a saint they are for “saving” it. If the dog is no longer a victim, then they don’t get the savior attention that they so desperately crave. They put their own needs for attention and validation above the needs of the dog for mental stability.

          • Angela

            I have never heard such a disgusting statement in all my life and am personally offended. Of ALL the rescuers I work with and personally know, EVERYONE’S goal is to rehabilitate the animals so they can live happy, full lives and successfully integrate into loving families. I work every single day on rehabilitating BOTH my rescues. It would be so much easier, a lot less stress, tears, money, time, travel, scratches, to just be a victim to their actions, but THAT is NOT why we rescue! I can proudly say they are doing wonderfully through appropriate training! You, ma’am, could learn a LOT from Cesar.

          • Angela Chaisson

            Hear, hear, Angela! People who WORK (paid or not) for rescues know a heck of a lot more about dogs than Karen does. They deserve our respect and support for the awesome job they do.

          • Laura

            you all are full of it. I BELIEVE KAREN it could be done, that’s all I got to say about it, I have seen other people do it, I’m sure she does it her way, not by the book, and that takes love,.

          • Chelly Smith

            I HAD A DINGO/BASENJI MIX THAT HAD BEEN BADLY ABUSED USING FOOD AND THEN DROPPED OFF OUT IN THE COUNTRY. THE NEW ANIMAL CONTROL LADY HAD HER AND I SAW HER AND IMMEDIATELY WANTED HER. SHE WAS BEAUTIFUL. AT FIRST SHE DIDNT WANT TO LET HER GO BUT 2 DAYS LATER, BROUGHT HER TO ME. OVER THE NEXT TWO YRS. I DISCOVERED, THE ABUSE, HOW IT WAS DONE,(FOOD) AND BY WHO! SHE WOULD WAIT BESIDE ME, WHEN I PUT FOOD IN HER DISH UNTIL I SAID ,”OK, YOU CAN HAVE IT”. SHE WAS VERY AFRAID TO LET PEOPLE PET HER. SHE NEVER TRIED TO BITE ANYONE, JUST WOULD KINDA DO A DUCKING THING, WHEN APPROACHED. AFRAID OF BEING HIT.THEN I MOVED TO ANOTHER HOUSE, NEXT TO A RESTUARANT. SHE WOULD LAY OUTSIDE ON THE SIDEWALK IN FRONT OF THE HOUSE. AND THE COOK WAS 6’5″ TALL AND WHEN HE’D GO TO GET IN HIS TRUCK , SHE WOULD RAISE HELL WITH HIM. THAT’S WHEN I REALIZED SHE HAD BEEN ABUSED BY A BIG MAN. SHE LIKED FEMALE GENDER! IT TOOK 2 YRS FOR HER TO FINALLY GET USED TO PEOPLE PETTING HER. SHE WAS THE BEST DOG I EVER HAD AND IVE HAD A LOT OF DOGS IN MY LIFE! SHE WAS 1 1/2 WHEN I GOT HER AND HAD 2 LITTERS, THEN I HAD HER FIXED..SHE LIVED TO BE 16 1/2 BUT GOT ARTHRITIS SO BAD I HAD TO PUT HER TO SLEEP. SHE COULDNT STAND UP ANYMORE AND WAS SICK! I LOST A GREAT FRIEND AND PROTECTION IN MY LIFE THAT DAY! IT WAS NOT FUN TO SAY THE LEAST TO LOSE HER! SHE DIDNT WANT TO LEAVE ME.. SO DIDNT GIVE UP BUT I KNEW SHE WAS HURTING SO BAD. A VERY SAD DAY! MISS HER VERY MUCH! ALL MY FAMILY AND FRIENDS LOVED THIS DOG LIKE THEIR OWN! SHE WAS A DELIGHT!

          • Kimble Gabbard

            IVE RESCUED AND TRAINED DOGS FROM THE FIRST AMERICAN TO EVER JUDGE THE TOY GROUP AT WESTMINSTER….DICK DICKERSON….HE AND AL GORE ARE FIRST COUSINS!…..I HAVE EXPERIENCE WITH …DOGS!!!….THE AMERICAN BULLDOG AND ENGLISH….THEY HAVE HOPE!!!…..NO PIT WILL EVER GET CLOSE TO A CHILD THAT IM WITH!!!!…..KAREN….YOU HAVE CLASS AND YOU CAN GIVE ME ADVICE ANYTIME ON ANY DOG!!!….KIMBLE L. GABBARD!

          • http://www.wyomingasatru.com Amy D. Bernard

            Kimble is there a reason you’re “shouting”?

            Any American Staffordshire Terrier is only as good…or as bad…as the humans who own it.

          • Charlie

            Damn what are you a Karen groupie? Or a name dropper? Either way seems to me That you are full of shit!!!!!

          • Deborah Turnbull

            People are cruel, Karen I guess this page is the perfect example of no good deed goes unpunished. I think it’s great all the help you give and screw them! you have a right to your views if pit bull lovers cared more they’d do more to help get these animals out of the homeless shelters. I know many pitbull lovers and honestly they go thru alot of dogs. Hmm they also send them to the very place they rescued them from. I don’t trust pit bulls around children either and for good reason. They simply can’t be trusted and have proven to many times that they can attack children for no apparent reason. Yes all dogs can but pit bulls are much more aggressive just like a doberman and rottweiler.

          • Angela Chaisson

            Everyone certainly has a right to their own opinion. It’s people like Karen and you, Deborah, who promote the myth of certain breeds being “dangerous” and who obviously have never taken the time to get to know any pit bulls. Thank goodness most people know better. Dogs behave how their people train (or don’t) train them to, regardless of breed.

          • Scott Therrien

            I’ll bring my 2 80 pound pitbulls to your kid’s and they will lick them to DEATH!

          • Angela Chaisson

            You would learn a lot watching an episode of Dog Whisperer. Provided, of course, that you are willing to learn from others, which doesn’t seem likely.

          • Angela Chaisson

            I agree that the former abuse/neglect should not become the dog’s identity, but it’s pretty much a no-brainer that knowledge of the dog’s former situation would be helpful in tailoring a training/rehabilitation approach to the dog’s specific needs. Which you obviously don’t do.

          • chaiandme .

            Wow, you are rude.

          • Karen
          • angelaV

            I don’t see how your dog got over it that quickly, I had a rescue, he was a GSD mixed with pitt. He was a puppy when I rescued him from his abusive and neglectful “owners”. I have had him almost a year and is now just starting to be more comfortable with other people. He started trusting me after several months of hard determination and he only trusted my cats after a while at first and then he has seen that I can be trusted. i am a vet assistant so of course i had training in this. But like i previously stated, its been almost a year and he is 1 and still traumatized and just now starting to trust

          • CB

            Wow, Karen, I had a shelter pit with one eye and a scar across its neck who never would have tried that aggressive behavior. What’s your dog’s breed? Maybe it should be banned.

          • Charlie

            LMAO I agree

          • Keena Cauthen

            I’m just curious… do you see people in the same light? No such thing as PTSD for our veterans, ignore them into better, more socially acceptable behaviors? What about the abused kids or spouses? Or the victims of other abuses? Are these just learned responses that can easily be rectified by your methods? Just saying that not all pets, rescued or otherwise, react the same to the same type of treatments, no more than all traumatized humans react and respond to treatments the same. This is not a one-size-fits-all treatment, so it doesn’t make what others do wrong and yours right. I had a dog that was never abused, I had her from the day she was born (in my own house) till she died… but she acted like she was beaten if anyone came up to her (tail tucked, cowed down, scared)… this was her personality. She was a happy, well-behaved, member of our family, adapted easily and quickly to human babies being brought into the house, but if you let a stranger come up to her, she did the cowering, scared act. Once she got to know you, she was good. She just didn’t like strangers coming up to her. How did I handle this? I kept walking her, kept letting others come up to her and pet her, but it never stopped that reaction from occurring every time it was her first time meeting someone. A dog has a personality as individualized as people do…. and the mesh between the dog and the human(s) it will be around is part of the behavior you will see coming out in all participants. My current dog is my children’s dog… he’s not as well-trained as he could be, but he is good enough for what we do with him (play with him in our yard, take him on walks, play inside with him). You let my father take him, as my father sits for us when we have to go out of town, and he’s a completely different dog, appears to be the most well-trained dog we’ve ever personally dealt with. He heels, he’s and haw’s, and basically responds immediately to any command from my dad. Why? It’s his personality… he’s very trainable and dad took 2 hours to train him to do all that, yet in our house, that’s not as important and so he has less demands for that from us. But he remembers and behaves one way with dad and another with my boys…. and it works for us. Just saying, each dog, whether abused or not, whether neglected or not, will respond in a different way to different solutions and it’s very small minded to think that every dog that is not responding quickly or to your standards is being allowed to remain “victimized” or whatever….perhaps they are just not the same as the dogs that you have “saved”. Perhaps you should be more open-minded in allowing others to work with their dogs as they see fit, and do what you would with yours. I for one would never treat a dog in my house the way it sounds like you do yours, but then I do see them as a member of my family. You are welcome to your ways, and I am welcome to mine….that’s the glory of living in a free country.

          • Angela Chaisson

            Very well said, Keena, I agree. :)

          • Jennifer

            I agree Karen. We adopted a Pomeranian about 12 years ago that was abused. He wouldn’t let anyone pick him up without trying to nip and growl at us. He eventually let my husband pick him up before me. I agree that you don’t coddle them when they are doing something you don’t want them to do because they think you are praising the behavior and will keep doing it. Ignore whatever behavior you are trying to break them of and eventually they will stop. It is like a child, be consistant.

          • Keller Panther

            I totally agree a dogs past has no bearing during rehab you cant treat the dog like a poor abused animal and expect it to recover you have to expect it to do what you want it to and yes depending on the case it can be fully rehabilitated in a month some take a little longer … If done right none should never take years … If its taking years you arent doing it right …

          • Angela Chaisson

            Cesar Millan you’re not. And no, I don’t think I am either. Yes, dogs need discipline and structure. But they also need affection at appropriate times. You brought an abused, fearful dog into your home and gave her no affection and didn’t talk to her except to give commands the entire first week? Dogs know better than that, but then again, dogs instinctively know how to treat other dogs. You obviously don’t. Nor do you understand them. You might want to read ‘The Lost Dogs’ – the story of Michael Vicks’ dogs – it might change your misinformed opinions about dog rehabilitation (and pit bulls – and yes I know we’re not talking about them).

          • Navybrat

            Oh, please! Are you actually comparing yourself to top trainers? LOL!!

          • Karen

            Reread DS, I didn’t compare myself to a top trainer. I simply stated it’s done. For every lame-ass excuse for a dog’s behavior, there are trainers fixing dogs just like it. For every 20 trainers saying it can’t be fixed, there’s one fixing it.

          • gavr001

            Karen, I understand that there are lots of different ways to help animals and some things work differently for different dogs. I think all of the opinions offered are valid and I think they are attacking you because you present your opinion with no room for others. I think structure is good for dogs, I also think that some dogs recover more slowly than others. In addition to that I think owner responsibility is one of the biggest problems and closed mindedness is the biggest problem no matter what debate you enter. And if you don’t want to be open minded try not to belittle people who think differently than you.

          • Haidimeng

            What happened in a dogs past is certainly not irrelevant. Dogs take in so much when they are abused and some things they can never forget. This goes for any animal, even fish. We took in a pit for rehabilitation that came from a junk yard. The owner of the dog went out and gave it food and water every day and usually beat it daily to keep it aggressive towards people. The dog attacking him and nearly killing him is what alerted the local law enforcement to what he was doing. Two friends and myself rode along with the local leo’s to the scene to see if we could help the dog. After a few weeks working with a local vet to try and re-break/reset some bones while Scooter was drugged up we finally got him to start looking like a health dog. One year later after working with me he is almost back to normal but i can never adopt him out or put him into a different home because of one thing. Apparently the previous owner always walked up to him with a newspaper in his hands, if any of us come close to him with any type of paper or even soft cover books he backs up and takes on a very aggressive stance. Sometimes an animal just cant come back from some things after experiencing that much trauma. he littlest things can be triggers. I took in a box tortoise that had the same type of thing happen to her. Don’t approach with any type of fish, I’m not sure why but don’t do it if you value your toes/fingers.

          • Tony

            If you can really do that, that is astounding and I applaud you. People may disagree with your technique (I personally believe in positive reinforcement) but if your dogs truly turn out as happy and confident as you say, that is a serious thing to consider. However, I don’t understand how you can keep fighting against pit bulls when you allow an aggressive, previously abused dog into your home, putting yourself and other animals at risk, because you believe she deserved a second chance. How do you turn away pit bulls in similar situations? Because of what you have read?

            This simple fact is that the number of positive experiences with pits on this thread ALONE probably outnumbers the credible news stories of attacks you can find in which a pit attacks a human unprovoked (meaning no history of abuse, not begin trained to fight). Let me give you one more though, just in case.

            My mom, like you, always was afraid of pit bulls. When we were scouring shelters for a new companion for our other dog, she would write off every single pit she saw. We ended up adopting Lilah, who was listed as a German Shepherd/Saint Bernard mix. I knew better from my years of experience working at rescues, and the pre-vet class I was enrolled in at the time. She was clearly half pit bull, half great dane. We got her home and the first thing she did was attack my other dog–to play. She got inside, sniffed the cat, and ignored him. She is perfect with children, she’s well behaved on a leash, and she has never so much as snarled at another living creature. The vets speculate, however, that she sustained some head trauma as a puppy that causes one of her eyes to droop down today. Being a pit bull, that probably means she was abused. My male, the dog we got Lilah as a companion for, is a newfoundland mix. He was four years old when we got him, and he had a huge caution sign on his kennel at the shelter. The handler who took him into the play yard so we could sit with him warned as against his vicious side. It’s 7 years later and we just finished taking him to an event with hundreds of other dogs and people, including many children. His tail never stopped wagging. We put 0% work into either dogs. They just came home feeling happy, safe, and loved and I suspect that’s what helped them put aside their pasts. The only problems we’ve had with either of them is a little incontinence. A far cry from the ferocious beasts you claim to see. Come to my house, and the cat will do more damage than our big, scary dogs.

            So I agree that not all dogs who are abused retain their victim status. But I don’t think that’s true of all dogs either. Heck, I’ve worked with abused hamsters (who are far simpler than dogs) who retain signs of trauma throughout life. One of mine, who came from a pet store that uses breeding mills, sustained nightmares all of her life. You would hear the poor thing screaming. Just like veterans, rape victims and victims of child abuse often retain some level of PTSD all their lives, animals experience the same. It changes you. I truly hope you have not been hurt in such a way, but if you have, please reflect on how that changed your life. Think about how you are a different person because of it. I know that as a victim myself, it has dramatically impacts all aspects of myself and I have had to work hard to get to the point where I am now. But it’s not gone. It didn’t melt away by ignoring it. It took a lot of love and support to get me here, and I think our animals deserve the same.

          • Lynn B

            Thank You for your comment ! You are right on the money !~! Abused animals are different ~ My girl doesn’t like people coming by us when we are out, and don’t even think about coming near the van “she owns the van” and children running or someone with a hoodie on — wow that really sets her off

          • amylouwho80

            It sounds like you are not the leader over your dog. Abused or not, you HAVE to be the boss. She does NOT own that van. You do!

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            Karen is such an expert yet her fb page shows how much she hates “pit bulls” and “pit mixes” which make up over 30 percent of all shelter animals. Some of which suffer the most abuse!!! I find that pretty hypocritical since she just said that structure structure structure does it but she doesn’t think these dogs have a right to a second chance???

          • Karen

            No, I don’t. And I’m pretty sure you’re not on my facebook page.

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            Then everything you have written is a joke.. enough said

          • Heather Pettit

            I don’t understand. Karen, you don’t think pit bulls, as a breed, deserve rehabilitation but you take in known biters who have tried to attack you? You do realize that all dogs have teeth, right?

          • Tracey Smith

            And that small dogs statistically are more prown to bite for NO REASON than a large dog?

          • Donald Helsel

            This is actually true. I have ran into quite a few vicious little guys who would love nothing more than to sink their teeth into me , and I’m very animal friendly and most love me. Most of the time it is because the owner does not make them see it as bad, and one time even told me.. give it some treats and it will stop…umm no

          • Pam

            Yeah, but at least they can’t kill you (maybe mess up an ankle or wrist) like that Boxer did the other day.

          • Susan Davis Lmt

            It’s rare that a dog doesn’t give warning too, before biting; something, whether it be prickly hair or a upturned lip, baring teeth…something.

          • Karen

            No, correct, and yes.

          • Scott Therrien

            I have been bitten by more chihuahua and licked by more pits then anything Karen i know some people are a little slow

          • Lisa

            Most dangerous part of our Pit was her tail… when she got it wagging, it could really hurt your leg.

          • Fullerene

            That may be true, but after you’re bitten by a pit bull you may not be around to post about it.

          • Matt Robinson

            Been bitten by Powerful Breeds many times and it is because weak minded people have made them that way…. go cry elsewhere

          • Dave

            OHH Got her!!!! hahaha what a moron!

          • Tony Bifulco

            she doesnt have to be on your “PAGE” to see what you say….hypocrites ALWAYS get caught

          • Karen

            Unless she is seeing family pictures, dog articles, recipes, funny memes, etc., she isn’t on my facebook page. She is simply seeing my comments on other “discus” articles. I’m not “caught” in anything and how am I a hypocrite? I follow the news stories of hundreds of pit bull attacks on humans, pets, and livestock and many of those articles are on the “discus” format for commenting. That’s not rocket science. You can see anyone’s comments on other articles. I’m not discussing pit bulls on this article – period. If anyone wants to know my views on the topic, as has been pointed out, you can link back to the articles and my comments.

          • Karen

            And I frequently comment on articles connected via FB so those do show up because they are public posts – so there is nothing to hide.

          • Dr_ML_Shanks

            Karen: Pits are simply the latest bogey man of dog breeds…
            Like the great vicious Doberman scare of the 1980s.

            Scientific studies have repeatedly demonstrated that Pits fall in the LOW end of natural dog aggression. A recent University of Pensylvania study ranked the dachshund, chihuahua and Jack Russell terrier as the most naturally aggressive dogs. But you don’t hear about the people bit by *those* dog breeds…both because they are less common (Pits are the #1 dog breed in the nation) and because they haven’t gotten the silly reputation reinforced by the media of being vicious. In 19th century England, Pits had the *opposite* reputation….of being so biddable and loving that they were considered the perfect family pet for children, and referred to as “nanny” dogs.

            Frankly, over 90% of all dog aggression issues are the fault of the *owners*, for failing to socialize or train their animal.

          • Karen

            Again, I’m not discussing it on this article – you can find my posts on the subject by clicking on my name. And I’ve heard all that nonsense before.

          • Kris Senior

            you should stand by your word, regardless. why would anyone need to go on a fishing expedition for your opinion? ashamed of something?

            every animal deserves a second chance, regardless. In fact, the only reason ANY animal would need a “second” chance is because a human being messed up their first.

            and btw, since i am very involved in rescue, it takes a VERY, VERY. VERY long time for abused rescues to stop being so protective and anxious.

          • Karen

            I do stand by my words but this is NOT an article re: pit bulls. This isn’t the place. “Being involved in rescue” hardly makes you an expert on dog behavior/training. Most of the people “involved in rescue” are clueless volunteers with a good heart and intentions but don’t know a lot about dogs.

          • Kris Senior

            Actually, i was a foster home for rescues and i just adopted one.
            I actually just paid 8 grand to heal a homeless dog hit by a car. My girlfriend and my sister are both on the vet track, going to school to work with animals.
            “Most volunteers are clueless”? You are quite lovely, arent you?

            I am very knowledgable on the subject. To say this article isnt a bout pitbulls and we should keep it about what it is is hysterical. You have reached way further subjects in your post.

            You are rude. You make ridiculous accusations. You are the clueless one.

          • Angela Chaisson

            “Clueless volunteers?” Wow, what a nice, supportive thing to say about those dedicated people who devote hours of their time to foster dogs and help in other ways to rescue dogs and find them forever homes. Working with dozens (even hundreds) of rescued dogs over many years DOES give a person a lot of experience in dog behavior and training, even if they don’t have professional training. I’ve met these people and I’ve adopted dogs they’ve worked with – you obviously haven’t. And frankly, your opinion on dogs/training/behavior doesn’t carry much weight – no one who claims to truly know or care about dogs would say that a breed of dog – ANY breed – does not deserve rehabilitation. All living things deserve a chance to have a good life.

          • Karen

            Ahhh – now I’ve pissed off the nutters!

          • Lisa

            No, you’ve basically just validated everything they’ve mentioned about your behavior.

          • Anna

            My brother in law has a pitbull. He also has a four-year-old, a two-year-old, another baby on the way, and several cats. The worst I’ve seen the dog do to the kids is knock them down because of being very high-energy. He licks the cats clean and plays like a father to them. I’ll be the first to admit that I know very little about dogs, but solely from experience, pitbulls are not naturally aggressive creatures at all.

          • Karen
          • Anna

            Did you not even read the second link you posted? They blatantly say that it’s not about the fact it was a pitbull. They said it was just that it was a DOG and all dogs have the ability to love and the ability to bite.

          • Karen

            “There are countless child and adult fatalities and numerous attacks leaving a person maimed and traumatized because we have not been educated about the genetic predisposition of pit bulls and fighting dog breeds.”

            It is very clearly “about the pit bull” – http://www.babybeaufoundation.org/rep-waites-and-mrs-rutledge-discuss-bully-breed-legislation/

          • Scott Therrien

            go home karen your drunk

          • Angela Chaisson

            No offense, but I think I’ll drop out of this discussion. Karen, you are one of the most negative, mean-spirited people I’ve ever run into. Most adults can have a conversation with others without attacking them merely because their opinions differ. I hope you figure out whatever it is in your life that makes you so mean to others. You must be a very insecure and unhappy person. I feel sorry for you. And your dogs.

          • Navybrat

            Well, Karen, you have shown us that you certainly are no expert. You also appear to have an exaggerated sense of your own importance. I find it amusing that you call volunteers “clueless”, when you yourself are so ignorant.

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            Yet you ( with no actual credentials) are telling everyone else they don’t know what they are talking about and making blanket statements about people involved with rescue groups. Karen isn’t that what you said you did? You worked full time and then worked with a shelter and dogs on the side

          • Naomi Jean Dawson

            Karen in all your reading & comments you fail to mention the pit bulls, true breed name Staffordshire Terrier. It was never breed for anything, like fighting. It once was a great family dog, That some idiots got it into their head, would make a great fighting dog. Hence the beginning of Pit Bulls.. These dogs began in England & were primarily used in the country side as family dogs, Dogs that, naturally protect, & let you know if someone is on your property. Like all dogs the really bark. The reason they turned them into pit bulls is that they have the massive jaw bone structure that when it clamps down to bite, it locks its jaws. Since your a great expert on the breed I’m sure you forgot to mention this

          • Karen

            Sorry, it sounds like you’ve had a big glass of the pit propaganda kool-aid! Maybe you’d like to cite sources for your claim? Please, educate me on the real history of pit bulls. You aren’t keeping up because don’t you know the current party line is that the Staffordshire Terrier *isn’t* a pit bull? I know, I know… it changes all the time and it’s hard to keep all the pit lies straight. Many are still clinging to the nanny dog myth but even Bad Rap has come out against saying that (ya know, ’cause it’s a lie). Here is a great expert on the breed (maybe you should write him and bring him up to speed about the “country side family dogs”!) – https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_TQhn0TrPSbdzhIVTdwUVFkUFk/edit

          • Karen

            And no, nothing “locks its jaw” – they are just powerful and strong and choose not to let go. The “locking jaw” is just a myth. They hold on because they like it!

          • Sandi`

            Take a break, Karen. You are so certain you are correct and no one apparently cares about your misguided,unfounded opinions.

          • Navybrat

            I wouldn’t waste my time on anything that you have posted. Your ignorance is palpable and your arrogance misplaced.

          • Matt Carrier

            I’ve read a majority of your comments and I must say that I’d love to see things from your perspective but I can’t seem to get my head that far up my ass.

          • Sharronda Outwitheoldinwiththe

            My Chihuahua’s are more more aggressive than any dog I have come in contact with.

          • DianeM

            When is the last time a pack of chihuahuas killed a child?

          • Scott Therrien

            they bite more then anything they are the devil’s little mice there evil every single one i have ever met was aggressive if they could kill they would

          • Susan Davis Lmt

            Anyone remember ‘the little rascals’? Wasn’t that the dog used in the series a Pit Bull?

          • Karen

            Yes – and if you want to get the real story about that dog (s), I suggest reading this book: http://www.amazon.com/Little-Rascals-Life-Times-Gang/dp/0517583259/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1388698121&sr=1-1&keywords=little+rascals

          • Jessy Fiecke

            What do you want us to know about the dogs from this book? That some jerk poisoned the first “Petey”? That they were well trained, they continued to use a Pit Bull terrier through out filming? Even for the 1994 remake?

          • 23333339v2

            no…..it was a bull terrier. not a pit bull

          • DianeM

            It’s also because dachshunds, chihuahuas and Jack Russell terriers don’t kill chidren, and even adults, when they attack them. This is not a media bias – it’s a fact. You can defend “pitties” all you want, but the reality is that they are bred to kill. It’s not their fault, but it’s reality nonetheless. Any dog can attack, but a pit bull is far more likely to do real harm if they do so.

          • Jessy Fiecke

            You can’t “breed” a dog to kill. Don’t be ignorant.

          • Karen

            I suppose you also can’t breed a dog to herd? To guard? To retrieve? To point? To run? Breed specific traits mean nothing – that’s why you see so many Poodles and Afghans as police dogs and doing Shutzhund work. That’s why farmers use such a variety of dogs to control their livestock – so many use German Shorthaired Pointer and Irish Setters to bring in the cattle and sheep. And you know duck hunters so often go out with a pack of Greyhounds! You so frequently see a couple of Labs or Goldens guarding the auto body shop. Nah, you can’t breed specific traits into dogs – all breeds are totally the same. A dog is a dog right?

          • Lisa

            Slight difference between breeding for natural traits such as herding behavior and breeding for something that isn’t a natural behavior, like killing.

          • Karen

            ~facepalm~

          • Lisa

            Sweetie, there is a difference between hunting and killing to eat and being a relentless killing machine. I’m guessing you know that and are just being troll-some. No one is buying what you are selling.

          • Karen
          • Kimberly Norkooli

            Karen… ALL DOGS can BITE, ALL Dogs can KILL, all CATS can BITE.. all CATS can KILL…. ALL ANIMALS have the ability to BITE AND KILL… I do not care how small or how big. All Animals have the ability to become over stressed and SNAP… ALL animals have the ability to do just about ANYTHING to any other human or animal. Even the most domesticated animal can snap… rather from prior abuse, the way someone rasied the animal, a mental issue, over stressed… FUNNY… HUMANS CAN TOO! In all honesty no animal or human can be 100% trusted. The best one can do is if the animal is NOT yours… keep a decent distence… if the animal is yours… make sure you take safety pre-causions such as lesh, leads, muzzle would be ideal on dogs when out for walks. All animal ownders should have some type of fenced in yard incase a lead breaks or someone fails to shut a down fast enough. What I am getting at is BREED TYPE have NOTHING to do with how mean a dog can be or cat or any animal. True, I do agree to a point it depends on how the animal is taken care of and treated, but again care should ALWAYS be taken by BOTH the animal owner and the PERSON who doesn’t own the animal. Kids should be taught to NEVER approuch ANY animal…. and when passing someone WALKING their pet… to always keep a safe distence away. I feel most attacks happen because BOTH PARTIES failed to take control of the situation. If a child is hurt by an animal it is because the CHILD was NOT TAUGHT to stay away from ANIMALS that are not their own pets… and the OWNER FAILED to make sure that the pet was under their control while out and about. DO I FEEL PUTTING AN ANIMAL TO DEATH is the RIGHT action when an attack does happen… HELL NO!!!! Unless the animal has proven to attack more then once and the attacks being so bad that it required someone to go to the hospital!! Then maybe! I think each situation is different… sometimes I feel what should happen is the animal taken away from the owner… Placed is some type of foster situation until someone is willing to take on that animal and care for it the correct way. I also feel what should be taken in serious consideration is WHAT the OTHER PARTY DID to get attacked. Most animals get stressed out and scared when a little kid comes screaming and yelling right at them. AND NO, NO MATTER HOW IN CONTROL YOU ARE in caring and training that animal… FIGHT OR FLIGHT kicks in just as it does a human being. I LOVE animals… I own 2 cats and a sugar glider… in the past I have had two dogs and other cats.,.. Ginny Pigs, hamsters, fish, birds, etc… So I am far from an animal hater. I feel most animals are good and will always be that way.. same as humans… but their can be a bad apple (for whatever reason) and they just need extra care.

          • Elexsor

            You clearly have never heard of the Cordoba fighting dog.

          • Scott Therrien

            well you can but it’s just not right… sad thing is there is alot out there that thinks its ok =/

          • 23333339v2

            Talk about ignorant: You give me 6 Pit Bulls that have been in the ring and survived and I’ll breed you the best killer dog that you would ever not want to see. And I can breed that dog within 2 years

          • Karen

            No need – they’ve already done that a thousand times over!

          • Mindy James

            Not true at ALL. Here is a clip to story that occurred in UK. DON”T tell me that Pit Bulls are the only dogs that kill or have an “innate” desire to do so. Hell, I have a Basset Hound who’s sense of prey drive is off the charts! And they are NOT bred to kill. How many times does one have to hear this and refute it with facts before the dumbed-down masses finally get it? Get off your soap boxes and do some research on other dog breeds like COCKER SPANIELS, CHIHUAHUAS, POODLES for bite statistics and I think you may be shocked. But no, not gonna happen because you aren’t wrong and facts won’t change your thought process or lack thereof;

            http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2013/apr/09/baby-died-bitten-jack-russell

          • Nancy Ann

            I have both a pit bull and a Chihuahua both very sweet but my Chihuahua would be the first to bite if provoked

          • 23333339v2

            well if this were the 19th century then we would all be ok. And I am sure lots of “scientific studies” will show that piranhas are much more dangerous than any dogs. These two facts and a dollar will most likely get you on a bus: but the fact remains (for whatever the reason or whoever is to blame) that Pits cause the most deaths and vicious attacks annually (followed by Rottweilers). So unless you are a drug dealer or love the “sport” of dog fighting it boggles my mind why anyone would – given the hundreds of other breeds available – own a pit bull or Rottweiler. When you have to defend a breed as “but he is so sweet” then I think you’ve probably got the wrong dog.

          • Lisa

            Well lets see… when our son came home from the hospital at the wise old age of 36 hours, our Pit took one sniff of his toes and settled on the floor right underneath where he was on the couch. As our son got older and mobile, he crawled over the Pit, used her back to steady himself when he was cruising, chewed on her ears and got licked for his trouble. When she died at the age of thirteen, the only reason we adopted a Boxer rather than another Pit was because my husband was in the military and we had no control of where we would be transferred – at the time, many communities were outlawing them. Some of these have thought better of a breed specific law and changed the law to ‘vicious dog’… including where we currently live.

          • 23333339v2

            yes and I know a golden retriever who has bitten people. we all have our individual stories of sweet little pitties and vicious big Goldens. BUT the statistics don’t lie, Lisa – pit bulls are responsible for the most attacks and damage every single year. Every single year!!! What can I tell you – that’s just a fact

          • Mike Duvall

            And cows kill more people than pit bulls every year by stepping on them…… should that statistic be considered?

          • Karen

            First, source please for your claim.
            Second, are innocent people, wanting nothing to do with cows, being killed by them? Are cows breaking INTO homes by crashing through glass doors/windows and/or screens to attack people? Are cows leaping off balconies and out car windows to attack victims? Are cows going after babies in strollers? Are cows killing kids when they go to a friend’s house for a play date? Are cows killing anyone in their beds? Are cows terrorizing entire neighborhoods? Are cows tearing off scalps, ripping off faces, tearing off entire limbs, crushing skulls, snapping spines, and eviscerating their victims? Are these cows eating the torn of limbs of their victims? I had no idea – please tell us more about these bovine killers!

          • Mike Duvall

            During 2003–2007, deaths occurring in the production of crops and animals in the United States totaled 2,334; of these, 108 (5%) involved cattle as either the primary or secondary cause (1). During the same period, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska accounted for 16% of the nation’s approximately 985,000 cattle operations and 21% of the nation’s cattle and calf herd (2). To better characterize cattle-caused deaths in these four states, investigators reviewed all such deaths occurring during the period 2003–2008 that were detected by two surveillance programs, the Iowa Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (IA FACE) and the Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health (GPCAH). This report summarizes that investigation, which identified 21 cattle-related deaths. These deaths occurred throughout the year, and decedents tended to be older (aged ≥60 years) (67%) and male (95%). Except in one case, the cause of death was blunt force trauma to the head or chest. Circumstances associated with these deaths included working with cattle in enclosed areas (33%), moving or herding cattle (24%), loading (14%), and feeding (14%). One third of the deaths were caused by animals that had previously exhibited aggressive behavior. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5829a2.htm
            As far as your ridiculous questions, cows are not generally pets, so most of your questions are moot.

          • Karen

            Whew! Oh good! So the general public is pretty safe from murderous cows and it’s pretty simple to avoid a cow mauling by simply not working around cows. I feel much better now knowing I only have to carry protection against pit bulls and not cows too! That’s a relief! I have been attacked by a cow once and while it did give clear warning signs that I ignored (I was handling her newborn calf in the field, as she was an aggressive breed of cow), I lived to tell the tale, although I was bedridden for a couple of weeks. It’s not something I want to experience again, especially while out walking my dog!

          • Mike Duvall

            Actually, the general public is not as safe from cows as you might think due to outbreaks of e. coli 0157. By now, that’s probably well known though.

          • Karen

            I drink raw milk from a local farm with grass-fed cows. I’m not worried about that. Our industrialized meat and diary supply is beyond disgusting.

          • Mike Duvall

            I tried drinking chilled milk from a cow once and couldn’t stand the smell. Lol. Would drink it again if I was starving, but prefer store bought. Do you think supply and demand plays an important factor in your opinion of our industrialized meat and dairy supply being disgusting? How would you fix it? Please do not say “by going vegan” because a person can get food poisoning from vegetables as well. :)

          • Karen

            I love raw milk but then again, I grew up on a farm drinking it still warm from the cow (yeah, that sounds gross now, but kids, it was special). The smell can vary depending on the grasses. My raw milk doesn’t seem to have a smell at all although I once got some that smelled like onion of all things. I would never say go vegan because I believe for the majority of people, animal fats are necessary and healthy. There is a significant nutritional difference between grass-fed/pasture-raised animal fats (meats, eggs, butter, milk) and industrial produced.

            I watched “Food, Inc.” several years ago, followed by reading several books (all of Michael Pollen’s, “Animal Factory”) and a bunch of documentaries. The latest film I’ve seen on the subject was “American Meat” (and I got to eat dinner with Joel Salatin of Polyface Farm!) I’ve not eaten factory farmed meats since watching that first film. I think you fix it by supporting individual/family farms with sustainable and humane practices. Know your farmer and know where your food comes from. I used to be in a raw milk co-op which meant once a session, I had to go to the farm to pick up the milk for everyone. I got to see how the cows live, how the milk is handled, and often got there before they had it bottled and had to wait until after the morning milking! And while I don’t think vegan/vegetarianism is the answer, we could do with eating a lot less meat. Most Americans eat meat three meals a day. We could make a significant impact by only eating meat once a day, and even more of an impact only eating it 4-5 times a week.

          • 23333339v2

            Yes Mike it should be considered – if you are a farmer. So let me ask you a question, Mike: statistically cigarettes cause lung cancer more than any other “thing.” Should we dismiss that ‘cuz – what the hell – it’s just a statistic. If we are really careful with our smoking we probably won’t get lung cancer. As I said in a comment above, if you have to explain how sweet and fuzzy your dog is – you’ve probably got a problem breed. Here’s a bet for you: the next crazy bastard that takes a gun and shoots up a school yard will be described by his neighbors, thusly: “but he was such a quiet and sweet little boy.” Did you know that – statistically – most kids who take a gun and two hundred rounds of ammunition inside a school probably mean to shoot people? Of course who looks at statistics

          • Mike Duvall

            Nice. I was just trying to apply a little humor to the discussion. Dismissing the problem, however, was not my idea. Just trying to put perspective on the fact that people die from animals and there really isn’t much we can do about it on this discussion board.

          • 23333339v2

            oops. sorry

          • Mike Duvall

            It’s all good. You know what they say, “sticks and stones may….yada yada”. lol

          • 23333339v2

            Yeah. I usually don’t get involved in these discussions – kinda like discussing politics and religion. I think the “doctor” kind of got me going with his quasi-scholarly generalities about dogs in the 19th century, for Christssake! I think I’ll just watch a hockey game instead. Jerry

          • Lisa

            That’s as ridiculous as blaming crime in low economic areas on race rather than economic reality. Goldens don’t look fierce, therefore they aren’t bought and trained as guard dogs by gang members and drug dealers. I’ve known many guard type dogs (Rotties, Shepherds, Dobies, Pits), none have been anywhere as nasty as my Dad’s mini doxie. I’ve lived in a community with a large number of working dogs for the last decade. Although they are not pets while they are on active duty, and the public is not allowed near them, after retirement they have become family pets with great manners.

          • 23333339v2

            Well, I know you believe that drug dealers don’t use Goldens because they…..look sweet!! Of course – silly me – that must be the reason Golden Retrievers are not used as guard dogs because they look so sweet. So would you now like to turn your efforts to some other discussion that makes even a modicum of sense? My border collie does not retrieve sticks thrown into San Francisco Bay because he is not bred to do such a thing (nor can he find ANYTHING with his sense of smell) – he isn’t built for it physically or genetically. But my last dog – a Golden – could swim in the Bay for hours in 50 degree water (she had webbed feet and lots of oil in her coat). Now I have no doubt that I could train my Border to swim on command, because I am a good dog trainer and he is a smart dog – but he would NEVER be a good swimmer. I would not be able to improve his scent “hound” lack of talent….but he can herd like a sonofabitch. ‘Cuz it’s in his DNA, Lisa. His love for me and his devotion to me can never neutralize what he was bred to do – if he is going to herd, he is going to herd, and you’d have to shoot him to stop it.

          • Lisa

            Nice attempt to duck the metaphor. Some family lines of the breed have been bred for aggression, that is different from being bred to kill. It’s like a Boxer line being bred to have better markings, or a prettier stance for showing as opposed to being bred as a working dog.

          • Lisa Hillis Slayback

            I am not a drug dealer nor do I love the sport of dog fighting but I do own a Pit and he is gentle and loving, and sooooo sweet.

          • Dr_ML_Shanks

            Again, more dogs, more possibility for bad owners to screw up dogs. If the most popular breed of dogs were Chows, and gang bangers thought them the new status symbol, doubtless we’d be hearing about vicious attacks from them.

            And the notion that Pits are “bred to kill?” LOL. Apparently, Karen doesn’t know much about the history of the breed *or* historical dog fighting. I’ve got a paper for academic publication on the latter subject, not because I condone it, but because it is important to appreciate in understanding the dogs.

            Pre-mid 20th (prior to WWII) century European and American dog fights were almost never “to the death,” and did not involving breeding for aggression….especially against humans. Since such fights involved extensive handling by neutral parties (both in and out of the ring) and a (human) vicious dog would be rejected out of hand from such competition. Dogs were too valuable to be sacrificed for sport, and victory was defined by one dog or the other’s submission, being unwilling to continue to fight. (incidentally similar to modern MMA) The most prized trait was “gameness,” which was defined as the willingness of the dog *to do what the master commanded* (to fight)… Dog aggressiveness was only acceptable within the confines *of human direction*, generalized dog aggression was considered a serious fault, and typically culled from breeding.

            This really only changed with the rise of Hispanic gang culture in the 1950s and intermingling of dog fighting practices from South and Central America where fighting to the death was somewhat more common (I posit that bull & cock fighting may have had an influence on this difference), although *still* too expensive for most outside of criminal or drug cultures. The crossover from Hispanic to Black gang culture in the 1970s sealed dogfighting within the American underclasses.

            Why rehearse this story? To point out that even if we accept the notion that dog fighters are now trying to breed “killers,” it is neither human aggression that they *historically* have sought…nor has there really been sufficient *time* from the modern cultural changes to achieve such a breed change. Seriously… Do you think that *breeding* of a mere 60 years is going to fundamentally reverse the natural affinities of a dog bred for 3-5 centuries for tractability to human command? The problem is not the dogs, it is that the *humans* who control these dogs are training them in dangerous and stupid ways. And for every Michael Vick or gangbanger who trains a pit to viciousness…. there are dozens of *good* owners who discover that Pits make lovely family pets when that tractability, athleticism, and boundless energy is properly channeled.

          • Karen
          • rtjones427

            Karen you can stop with the links. Everyone has stopped taking you seriously :)

          • Karen

            No.

          • 23333339v2

            Well of course a breed can be changed in 60 years! I understand your need to sound scholarly, but any breed of animal that can produce young several times a year and has a lifespan of 10-12 years most definitely can be changed genetically in much less than 60 years. The so-called designer dogs were breeding true after three-four generations – and certainly within 3 years. There genetic makeup would certainly be consistent well before 60 years. And of course there are always true stories of fuzzy little Pitties. But if you are, indeed, a doctor (or at least a scholar) then why cannot you acknowledge the existence of statistical data? I never said the dogs were inherently vicious – I merely pointed out the statistics that are true and exist (want my current cute “Pittie” story: a slight – maybe 90 pound – girl in a dog park with an intact very large pit bull that was extremely aggressive – breaking free of her grip on the leash and tearing apart a King Charles Spaniel that I personally observed a few weeks ago; I seriously doubt that little girl condoned or trained her dog and his actions). This story is no different than the fuzzy little Pit stories – just immensely more significant.

          • rtjones427

            How is your story of a ”bad” pit more substantial then a ”fuzzy” pit story?
            Either could be false, true but you cant just assume that ONE pit bull you ”witnessed” attack another dog speaks for the entire breed.
            No one is saying all pit bulls are angels. But owners make or break a dog. Unfortunately since they are currently one of the most popular breeds there will be bad owners.

          • 23333339v2

            That’s EXACTLY the point – that you apparently have missed – my story is no different from the warm and fuzzy ones (and it happens to be true). The POINT is that these individual stories may or may not amuse, shock, or engender an “awwww” – it’s the annual statistics – year in and year – out that are significant. And in spite of all else the stats don’t lie.

          • rtjones427

            Again, REPORTED <—Key word.

            The media doesn't care when a ''family'' dog attacks but when a Pit bull does it makes national news.

            Do you have the same view on different races? If the news reports more of one race committing a crime do you label that entire race as criminals?

            Because that is exactly what you are doing.
            All dogs have the ability to bite and kill, just because one is reported more than the other doesn't make it any more dangerous.

            And again, your story is no more important then the countless ones about Pit Bulls doing good.

          • 23333339v2

            REALLY? So statistically we have good evidence (or stories, as you would call them) that cigarette smoking causes more lung cancer than any other outside…..stuff. But what the hell – it’s just a statistic and we probably shouldn’t put any more credence to it than say – asbestos causing lung cancer (‘cuz they both cause lung cancer so they must be the same…..kinda like a Chihuahua biting and a pit bull biting – they are both dog bites after all). Aside from the fact that there just isn’t a lot of asbestos anymore and there are still lots of cigarettes (like pit bulls – the most popular breed in the US). When was the last time you heard of any dog breed other than a pit bull or Rottweiler actually killing anyone?
            Are you old enough to remember the Chevrolet Corvair? It was determined that these cars were inherently dangerous. Not every Covair killed its driver, of course, but enough did that it made the newspapers (although there were lots of Dodge Darts that also were in accidents, I am sure). BUT statistically the Corvair was the clear “winner. And was banned. Oh those darn statistics!

          • rtjones427

            Statistics and news stories are two different things. And trying to comparing obtaining lung cancer to this issue isn’t making your point any better.

            What I am saying is that only pit bites are publicized and broadcaster nationwide. But when any other breed does the same thing, or a pit bull does something good it gets practically no attention.

            The same thing happened to breeds before the pit bull and eventually people will be discriminating against another breed.

          • 23333339v2

            So let me get this straight: some pit bulls are bred to be aggressive and, I guess, some are bred to kill (sounds pretty aggressive there, as well). now Lisa, I have been breeding dogs professionally for 40 years and training dogs professionally for over 50 years, and I can categorically tell you that you cannot breed a dog to be JUUUST a little aggressive – “bite him but don’t rip his arm off, Fido.” Not possible. You can train him to stop the attack (if he is smart enough and has the proper DNA – like a well-bred German Shepherd), but short of that…….not so much. So if Shepherds can be trained to stop, why can’t a pit bull (see below, Lisa)?
            I know you think my pesky statistics are merely metaphors-gone-wrong, so let me take another tack: why is it that police departments never use pit bulls as their police canines? Shepherds, of course; Dobermans occasionally (more so in Germany). But NEVER a pit bull. EVER. ANYWHERE. Why is that, do you think Lisa? Is it because they know that once it gets “going” it is impossible to control those crazy mothers? To think that way means they are probably have to relying on….statistics (there I go again, citing those nasty little tidbits of absolute truth – oops, excuse me, I mean metaphors).

            But here is really the BIG QUESTION: even if you think pit bulls might be dangerous, or if you think they might – statistically – be somewhat tending to the aggressive side of things – why would you want to take the chance? Are there absolutely no other breeds that can fulfill whatever need there is for having a dog? Uh oh….here comes another metaphor (wait for it): I own a gun. Not exactly sure why I own a gun, but I do – and I like it – apparently it fulfills some need I have and I’m not shrink enough to analyze that. Does my gun have a hair trigger? Absolutely not. Does my gun have a 200 round magazine? Never. It’s just a gun – it has the potential to be lethal, but I consciously make an effort to try to control it’s inherent lethal nature by NOT having a hair trigger and by not having an insane magazine. It can kill you, but most likely it won’t. How do I know that? Statistics tell me that hair triggers and 200 round magazines are much more likely to killers than my border collie…..er, gun….is. Get it? probably not.

          • Karen

            The answer to your really big question has already been answered above! And I think you’ll be surprised! Really, it’s a must read!

          • rtjones427

            Lisa? Not sure when this came into the convo but anyhow.

            First off Aggression is not a breed trait. Aggression is taught. And you breeding/training experience doesn’t really qualify you as an expert at Pit bull type dogs (as much as you like to think it does)

            Now,on to your ”BIG QUESTION” (since you clearly are avoiding mine)why would you take the risk with any breed? Can you honestly say that no breed has attacked or bitten someone, no you cant. Because all breeds of dogs have the ability to bite and we only have the data that has been submitted and reported.
            I choose my dogs based on personality, I personally fell in love with all four of my dogs (two of which are Pit bull types).

            And onto your gun metaphor, it could actually be used in the Pit Bulls defense.
            Is a gun dangerous on its own, no.
            Is a gun dangerous in the hands of a person who is not in the right mind and wishes to harm people, yes.
            Same with Pit Bulls, they are harmless on their own, but when the wrong person gets their hands on a pit all they see is the cash flow from the fighting life.

            Now that I have answered your questions, do you think you would answer mine?

          • 23333339v2

            sorry about the Lisa, thing. Sure I will answer your questions. Of course all breeds have bitten someone. That in and of itself means nothing. We are talking TRAITS here: most Australian Shepherds and Shelties bark. A lot. That’s a trait of those breeds. Most border collies herd very well – another trait of the breed.

            But not all borders herd well and not all shelties bark. But if you want a dog to herd your sheep you probably would get a border collie before you would get a pit bull…..’cuz borders were bred to herd and their innate “trait” is to herd. Just as that is missing in the pit bull. On the other hand, border collies are lousy fighters (too smart – they know how close to get to the sheep without getting too close – because they inherently know the sheep could kill them). So tell me – what were pit bulls bred to do?
            Aggression can be taught in many breeds -vbut not all (I’m not talking individual dogs, here, I’m talking breeds in the collective). You would be very hard-pressed to train a Golden Retriever to be aggressive. By the way, it would be difficult to train a border collie to be senselessly aggressive as well – it’s not in their nature – they are very forceful with the sheep but do not bite them (most people think they do – they don’t). Pit bulls (and Rottweilers, Chihuahuas, and others) are aggressive by nature and this natural aggression can be heightened by training or can just get out of control (bad breeding? who knows). The ultimate question remains: if you don’t need or want an aggressive dog, why buy one in the first place and then spend your evenings defending that decision on websites.

            Oh, and by the way, although I currently only breed two different breeds, I have also bred German Shepherds and I have trained dozens of different breeds – maybe more than dozens so I’m very confident of my dog knowledge in general and pit bulls in particular (I was directly involved with the breeding and raising of Staffordshire Bull Terriers for several years – remind me to tell you the story of the Staffordshire at Westminster back in the 80s some time. Jerry

          • rtjones427

            Oh and their are police officers who use Pit Bulls as police dogs.
            You have to remember that Pit Bull is a mix of breeds so they cant just make Pit Bulls strictly for police dogs like they do with German Shepherds.

          • rtjones427

            Your post is missing a key word, REPORTED. Not all dog bites are reported and actually the Golden Retriever beats the Pit in bites. But you must be getting your info from the crazy lady who runs numerous sites targeting pit bulls.
            The media will report what gets the most views, no one would tune in for a lab biting a child but a Pit? People go crazy. You unfortunately are amount the many idiotic masses :)
            How about spending some time with an actual dog before you spout idiotic quotes that are in fact FALSE.

          • 23333339v2

            Really? spend some time with dogs? Say, that’s a good idea. Let’s see: I put myself through law school by training dogs, and I own a kennel that breeds Golden Retrievers and Border Collies – and although I don’t currently live on the ranch I still own it and sales, day/nite care, and breeding fees have made this 150 acre ranch profitable every year for the past 42 years. But then…..what would I possibly know about dogs.

          • Mindy James

            It is because of their “biddable and loving” nature that the breed has become so popular with fighters. Their natural instinct to perform well for their owners made them the perfect dog to fight as they will literally die trying to please the very person who is putting them in the ring and killing them.

          • 23333339v2

            right. but it’s that other 10% ……………..

          • 23333339v2

            we are talking physics here, Doctor: Chihuahuas are EXTREMELY aggressive – and if they were built like a pit bull I have no doubt they would clean the Pit Bull’s clock. But they aren’t that size. Shall we scientifically talk apples to apples?

          • That Man

            You won’t discuss pit bulls on this article because it is “off-topic,” but the dozens of posts you have made certainly are not any more relevant to this particular article.

          • Angela Chaisson

            You follow news stories … uh huh, because the media is so unbiased and fair and upfront and all … not necessarily the smartest place to get your information. But I guess you search the internet a lot too and if it’s on the internet it has to be true, right? Yeah. No.

          • Drew2U

            …You sound like an ignoramus, darling. Just saying.

          • Karen

            Seriously? Said the db with a skin pic?

          • Drew2U

            –said the db with more than 20 years experience with rescues, darlin’.

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            Karen is just jealous because shes a mutant

          • disqus_V95QhuC1Kx

            Just shows that people like Karen, can only judge a book by its cover. There’s really nothing more to her than that apparently.

          • Angela Chaisson

            Seriously, Karen? What does someone’s profile picture have to do with anything?

          • Navybrat

            He has credibility Karen; you have none. You come off as a particularly unpleasant person who continues to display your ignorance and refuses to acknowledge it.

          • chaiandme .

            Karen, just drop it,, everyone here thinks you’re an idiot. I’ve been attacked by a Dauchaund, a poodle, and a cocker spaniel, (all completely unprovoked) but those stories never make the news, no matter how bad the injuries.

          • Paul Michael Lizzi

            and with knowledge of how pack works you can train any dog in less than a week…i know because i have, many times, with all breeds..regardless of abuse or what have you, the dog is a pack animal that is built around a social hierarchy…ignore that and you en up with a dog that misbhaves. everytime.

          • Tony Sorrells

            this is true. if you live in a dog pack. i dont lower myself to a pack mentallity. my dogs live in my home with me. i elevate them to our family mentality. doing less would be to fail my family and my dogs.

          • Crysania

            Dogs are NOT pack animals. Studies in the past 20+ years have shown that. They are social, but do not follow a strict hierarchy. Dogs that have gone through abuse and have fear issues can be worked with but it takes TIME. Far more than a week, especially if you want them to actually be happy and not fearful.

          • James Morgan

            Dogs are pack animals- period. They descend from the wolf. Terrible comment.

          • Crysania

            That is a long held belief that is a MYTH. Dogs and wolves descended from the same ancestor. But they became very different creatures. There were physical changes (not just the ones humans created, but things like shortening of the skull, canine teeth are smaller in dogs) and many changes in behavior. Dogs go into heat at 6 months, wolves at 2 years. Dogs retain neotenous behaviors like play their whole lives whereas wolves mature and lose those behaviors. Dogs became scavengers, living off village dumps, while wolves work to bring down large prey and also will kill small prey in lean months. There are HUGE differences between wolves and dogs. And one of those is the “pack” (which is really just a family unit in wolves — mother, father, yearlings who have not reached maturity and gone off to form their own family unit, and pups). Dogs are NOT pack animals and studies by actual researches in the field have found that while dogs are social, they do not form packs. Are you an actual researcher out in the field? If not, what research have you read that says they’re pack animals?

            And even if they DID form any sort of pack with their own kind, they KNOW WE ARE NOT DOGS. And therefore would not be part of that “pack” anyway. It’s a moot point because dogs are NOT pack animals.

          • James Morgan

            Haven’t you seen the film buddies and snow buddies? Are you a dog specialist? I have trained my dog to bring me pack of beer- hence the ‘pack’ mentality. How can you disagree?

          • Crysania

            I’ve made a study of dog behavior over the past several years and have read the research. I’m not a dog “specialist” but I’m very involved in dog training and behavior.

          • Joshua Ryan Teaff

            Wolves and dogs are decendant of the same animal. Stating changes between the two doesn’t disprove this, it only means you’ve done too much internet youtube comment page reading, and believe what ever you hear at “face” value. There is an ongoing study on how interaction and domestication changes the physiology of animals – from asthetics to mental, to physical changes. Could I be wrong? SURE, but that fact you’re so matter of fact, just highlights your ignorance. EDIT: If you’ve ever had multiple dogs, or brought in a new dog to a group of dogs – you can see pack mentality immediately. So, I dont’ get how you have missed this interaction?

          • Crysania

            I’ve read research by people out in the field who STUDY DOGS. This has nothing to do with “internet youtube comments.” Have you read the research? Or are you just going on what you think you see with your own dogs? Because people will always see what they want to. You’ve been told they’re a “pack” and so ascribe traits to them based on what you THINK you see. Those who are unbiased and went out into the field to study dogs away from human interaction (feral populations) have consistently found that while social, they do not form packs. I’m matter of fact because the research done in the last 20+ years has shown this time and time again. I really suggest reading Raymond Coppinger’s Dogs. He’s one of the leading researchers of feral dog populations. I don’t agree with everything he says in some parts of his books (his comparison of dogs to parasites and service dogs to slaves is rather odd), but his research about feral populations is outstanding.

            Jean Donaldson talks briefly about some of the observations and research here:

            http://academyfordogtrainers.com/blog/2013/are-dogs-pack-animals/

            Some good stuff here as well: http://www.caninemind.co.uk/pack.html

            And it all makes sense. Wolves NEED a pack because they tend to take down large animals and it requires multiple wolves to succeed. Dogs, on other hand, evolved to be scavengers, following people from place to place, feeding off their dumps. It was BECAUSE of these dogs that people were able to settle in one place and go from hunter/gatherers to a more agricultural society with real villages. Because the dogs ate the scraps they could not and it left the village dump much smaller.

          • patcee14

            We have three dogs who have formed a pack. When one is missing, the others are restless until they are all together again.

          • Crysania

            They’re social creatures. That sort of thing has nothing to do with being a “pack.” When my partner goes away I’m restless until he comes back. Does that make us a pack? No. Family members tend to act that way. They’re bonded to each other because they live in close proximity. I know plenty of people with a few dogs who aren’t really bothered if one is gone for a time. If dogs formed packs then they would be the same as yours is. It’s great yours have formed bonds with each other, but that does not mean they are a pack, like wolves are.

          • Mike Duvall

            So if wolves can form packs, but dogs just form social groups, does that mean that my dog that is one quarter wolf can form a quarter pack within a social group? :)

          • Krista L. Miller

            Honestly, I think it could be scary as a dog owner if your dogs actually formed a pack. Especially if you’re an infirm elderly person living alone, just think what could happen – cases have been reported of dogs turning on their owners and eating them.

          • Marialuisa Wittlin

            in my neighborhood are a pack of stray dogs killing cats, small dogs, goats- anything they can attack- and I mean attack- so tell me this is a social group! They behave like totally wild animals and when they see a prey they go totally crazy- ever seen a ‘social group of dogs’ tear apart a cat?

          • Tammy

            I find it sickening how people take a GREAT idea and totally turn it into a bash session for something they are spewing off at the mouth of knowing better than everyone else. Why not get back to what the original post is about?

          • RitaMc

            Yes, I believe you are right. We may be slicing into anectodal evidence and arguments of semantics We all know what the Dog Whisperer implies when he says “pack” in lieu of “social group”. English is his second language, anyways. The great thing is that he has brought light onto rehabilitating and reintroducing abused dogs back into family homes. Watch his 911 with the aggressive Rottweiller that no one could adopt. He is bringing a very positive message that some of these breeds that are marginalized by the press, can make great family pets.

          • Crysania

            Don’t even GET me started on him. Just don’t. He intimidates dogs into shutting down. There is very little positive in what he does, except that he does speak out against BSL. But otherwise he uses nearly abusive methods (choking out dogs, dragging fearful ones to things they are scared of, standing over resource guarding dogs and intimidating them into acting out, having a team of people who rile up a dog so it reacts on TV and so it “looks good” when he shuts it down with a few well-placed kicks to the side). He’s a reality TV star who knows very little about dogs except how to shut them down and has created a lot of business for real trainers.

          • Eleanor Jacobs

            agreed, he’s detrimental to dog training and dog owners.

          • Crysania

            So you’re going to blame this on me? Others brought the BS up about packs. I’m just trying to provide info from modern research that found that to be untrue.

          • Krista L. Miller

            Both descending from the same animal is NOT the same as one descending from the other. They have a common ancestor, much as humans are supposed to have a common ancestor with apes, assuming for the sake of argument that what we believe we know about prehistory is correct. One species developed in two (or more) distinct directions, thus creating two (or more) descendant species. While it is true that they are similar, and true that domesticated animals change merely by being domesticated, one cannot say that two distinct species would follow the exact same patterns of behavior.

            I have seen documentaries detailing how human domestication particularly affects speciation, so I don’t discredit the human effect on animal development. But just as there are distinct differences between one primate and another, there are distinct differences between one canine and another. As Crysania has mentioned, there have been research developments in recent history (within the last 20 years or so, it has been stated) which have overturned some long-held beliefs about dogs and pack mentality. It would be advantageous in this argument to pay attention to the current science of the matter.

            And to reiterate and elaborate upon something else that has been mentioned, dogs are NOT humans, and they KNOW that WE are NOT dogs. They expect humans to behave like humans, not like dogs, and they behave like dogs because that’s what they are. If somebody decided to behave toward you like a lesser primate and throw feces at you, you’d likely find it insulting to excuse such behavior with the passing comment suggesting that person were “no more than” a primate just like you. On the contrary, the argument could be made that we have evolved differently as such to have eliminated that particular behavior from being acceptable in our society.

            While I have not read all the research literature myself, Crysania clearly is better informed than those who are still spouting the old ideas of dog behavior. It would be wise to listen to what she can teach us about the findings of the more recent research.

          • Yuki

            Not to butt in, but I highly recommend reading The Genius of Dogs by Brian Hare, who studies dog cognition. He is the leading researcher on this, and carefully highlights how and why dogs– while being social animals and descended from wolves– are not wolves, and their social behaviors deviate from wolves’ for this reading (including, but not limited to, pack mentality.)

          • randomperson

            wow…snow buddies and buddies…that’s your scientific data? A children’s movie? You have trained your dog to bring you a pack of beer….you know what…that explains a lot about your opinionated and righteous comments…

          • Stephanie

            They did descend from wolves. They were breed into their behaviors today, they didn’t change over night… If you were to study a Husky and their behavior I would bet they have more qualities to a wolf then others. I’ve had numerous dogs in my life. I’ve had 4 great danes, work together to surround, come together and attack a yellow lab, and tore into him like they were a pack of “wolves”. So unless they just mysteriously picked that up on a movie, then I guess I don’t know how they just knew how to be a good working group because they seen another wolf do it somewhere at some point maybe? And even now, my mixed group of Great Dane, Husky, Lab/mix, work together to bring down our cats.. Yes wild wolves play too. You just do not get to see it every day because you do not live out in the wild with them. They KNOW we are not DOGS.. But they KNOW who’s BOSS.. And they are pack animals. They know it’s better to work in a group to bring down a meal then to work alone to survive. That’s why you always see stray dogs together. Even they know it’s best to work together then to be on your own. It’s funny how some people think that animals can not think for themselves..

          • Crysania

            Please for the love of all that’s holy read the research instead of spouting off what you “just know.” I’m so tired of this argument. I posted some of the research from people who actually know more than the average owner, but I guess that doesn’t matter because hey, Cesar Millan says they’re pack animals and you have to be the leader and whatever other nonsense he spews.

          • Leif Hoganson

            DNA tests have confirmed that all dogs evolved from Silver Wolves. They do not share a common ancestor…They were bred by humans to become dogs. Seems to me that you are the one who needs to do more research. http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/dogs-decoded/

          • Michael

            You should never have been allowed to own animals that you are unable to control.

          • Nikasus3

            I’m more concerned that you seem quite blase, in fact almost proud, about the fact you allowed your dogs to attack a lab (I trust you stepped in and rescued the lab and paid for it’s vet bills?!) and also your mixed group work together to “bring down our cats” (again, I trust no damage is actually caused to the cats?!). Your dogs obviously don’t know who’s BOSS, unless you encourage their behaviour in which case you shouldn’t be owning dogs, cats or any animals!

          • Stephanie

            Yes, I stepped in and rescued the yellow lab. And don’t worry about my two cats. With this terrible winter, all 5 of them are inside of the house as we speak. It just seems with the HUMAN mind likes to go to some very dark places.

          • Nikasus3

            Hi Stephanie, thank you for your response; I’m glad that you rescued the yellow lab, the cats are fine and that you are in total control of your dogs (and that they are all safe and warm indoors!).

            I apologise for misunderstanding the limited information that you posted, however I trust you can appreciate (and therefore take some responsibility for the reactions received) that words are used to tell stories and conjure up images in the reader’s mind and therefore “…attack a yellow lab, and tore into him like they were a pack of “wolves”” is likely to cause an individual to imagine something rather horrific and go to “some very dark places”. I am sure you can also understand that we all have experiences that we draw upon when reading and responding (we are dealing with subjective opinions not facts) and this will also influence our position. I have had the unfortunate experience of my dog being attacked and the other dog’s owner doing absolutely nothing (she froze with fear, it was not malicious) and therefore if I read a comment like yours I will always wonder about the outcome (I would say that is quite natural for an animal lover) and fairly or unfairly I will always question the attitude and aptitude of the owner (just for the record, my friend and I rescued my dog and the owner paid the vet’s bills – no long-term damage done).

            Perhaps more context and less sensationalism would ensure the reader focuses on your point rather than the details of your example.

            I wish you and your animals all the best.

          • Stephanie

            I do apologize for the lack of information, my cluster headaches had started so I was doing the best I could. I know, no excuses..

            I do know that I will be forever changed about my views on a dog since the yellow lab incident. I use to be one of those that thought all dogs were loving and fluffy. They are, loving and loyal. I did know that dogs were territorial as well. It never occurred to me how powerful or protective a dog truly can be. I have gained a new respect and better control of them.

            For those who do not like Pit bulls. I do not trust small dogs because they are more vicious and have harmed me many times over and I have never been bitten by a medium through extra large breed dog. I think the problem may be with the owner thinking it is so cute and funny that they are biting you. It is not cute and funny when they are drawing blood from my fingers and legs.

          • Chiana

            I think the only dogs you should own are stuffed ones. What kind of irresponsible owner fails to properly train a dog, let alone four and thinks it’s perfectly natural – in their nature – to attack other dogs and cats? And then you think it’s appropriate to come on here and lecture other people how they should treat and train their dogs. You AND your dogs need therapy, lady!

          • Stephanie

            Ever hear that a dog is territorial as well? The yellow lab came into our yard. As for my 3 dogs and our 2 cats, they just play with the cats, but act like the cats are prey while chasing them to bring them down, and by down is either cornered or where they know they have no choice but to surrender because they are surrounded. Any person you meet will tell you that I have well behaved dogs. Thank you for your concern though.

          • Drew Reid

            your stupid.

          • Ian James Roberts

            I think you mean ‘You are stupid’ or ‘You’re stupid’. Just saying.

          • Crysania

            Oh the irony…

          • Elise

            I just wanted a yellow ribbon for one of my dogs. What is everyone having for breakfast?

          • Allison Angus

            i have seen a wolf form a pack with regular dogs (he was 1/5 husky) and i have seen regular dogs do the same. yes, they know we are not dogs but they see us as the leader of the pack. my grandmas wolf always saw my grandma as the leader of the pack just like my boxer saw me as his pack leader. while im not a field reasercher i have experience with both wolves (two different ones, both about 1/5 another breed) and regular dogs of various breeds. i have looked at how a trained pitt bull acts twards its owner and they act like my grandmas wolf did and the wolf of a friends. its the same or simmilar to highly trained dogs or dogs in very structured homes. while i know this will piss you off, humans have a tendancy to form a pack known as a “family”. there is a clear structure on who is in charge and we split off to form our own families which also have structure and a hierarchy and it goes on and on… some even have a pedagree (royalty or nobility) and many are considered mutts (no clear i am chineese, i am german) we thrive when in a pack but if you get a lone wolf, they tend to be much weaker and struggle to fend for themselves. MANY animals (including ourselves) have a pack mentality but its more noticable in animals like wolves where it runs daily life. we even use simmilar terms, a matriarch of a family tends to run the family right? those under her have various ammounts of authority but the matriarch has last say when she needs to decide. same in a pack of animals. its not a stretch to say that in a situation where you throw an animal of any type into a pack of another animal, it will either be chased out, killed, or find its place in said pack.

          • Crysania

            Social groups =/= packs. Your “a pack is a family” seems to have merit until you look closer at an actual family. There is no linear hierarchy in a family either. At least, there shouldn’t be. The parents are clearly teaching and leading the children, but neither is the “alpha” to the other unless it’s a really screwed up relationship. And there should be no hierarchy of which child is more above the other (this destroys families; I’ve seen it firsthand). With dogs however, we’re talking interspecies and that doesn’t work. Do I control my dog’s resources? Of course. She can’t go out to the store and buy food for herself. But does she get to choose where we go on walks, when we go on walks, etc.? Absolutely. So who is the “leader.” Dogs are social, but the studies have shown they do NOT form “packs” (family groups) like wolves do. Their social lives are much less strict than that.

          • Cyrene Krey

            Actually human families could be argued to be packs. You’re assuming that there is one cohesive definition of what
            constitutes a “family”, but any anthropologist would argue with you on
            that.There’s almost always some sort of hierarchy in any interaction you encounter, whether familial or not. Very rarely is true egalitarianism a thing (although that would be pretty nifty). It isn’t any different for modern canines. Dogs have been bred to fit very well within human concepts of social groupings. A pack is a type of social group however, as is a family. So saying the two are mutually exclusive isn’t accurate. Also, the implications from both sides of this argument that it’s this way or that way seems a little silly. It goes back to the nature vs. nurture argument. Dogs aren’t purely pack animals (neither are humans), but that does play an important role in their lives and does help dictate the culture they will be growing up in and become influenced by. So, some dogs may exhibit more “pack mentality” aspects based on both genetics and influence from their human and nonhuman families and others won’t. One of my dogs is very pack oriented, while the other isn’t. I love them both the same, but respond differently based on their individual personalities. I’m much more typical “alpha” with my one because that’s what she responds to and I’m more human motherly with the other because that’s what he responds to. It’s all part of the fun ;)

          • Stephanie

            What about a coyote? Where and what did they descend from? When I lived in the desert for a little while, I watched two ADULT coyotes for a few years almost everyday, play with each other, in the heat, in the desert. I guess they’re not wolves though so they don’t count right? They must be part dog.. Just like people, their DNA structure is different in different breeds. What about people with the extra chromosome? I guess they are not people but a totally different type of person right? People tend to over complicate things and over think the most simple of things. Most of the wolf qualities were breed out. It takes a long time to breed things out. But since dogs can produce so much faster then humans, it doesn’t take as long as it does as it would for a human.

          • Jeannie Carle

            Dogs do NOT form packs? What planet do YOU live on? Obviously you’ve not spent a whole lot of time around dogs! Where I live, a few years ago, all the farmers in the area were on the hunt for a LARGE pack of strays! I helped hunt them myself, as we had horses who had foals and cows with calves! There were probably 20 altogether and many many breeds were represented. TAME WORK dogs will “pack” when their humans aren’t around – especially at night if they are not contained. When you’ve SEEN this, and the damage these packs can do, THEN you hop right in and comment. I’ve never had a dog that didn’t understand that I was the “pack-leader”. Without that, one has no control. I love my dogs with all my heart, but I AM the “big dog”, for their safety as well as anyone else’s.

          • Crysania

            I live in a world where I believe people who research and study something over anecdotal nonsense from random internet people. Dogs who are together =/= pack. A group =/= a pack. Dogs are social but do not form any sort of hierarchical structure. Running together, hanging out together, does not make a group a pack. And that “pack leader” stuff is just a lot of rot and nonsense perpetuated by a reality TV star that people seem to prefer to follow instead of real dog trainers, behaviorists, and researchers. I’m no “pack leader” to my dog. Because we’re not a pack.

          • Michael

            Dogs are not wolves.
            Bring up a wolf with dog pups, set them a task they cannot complete (the biscuits are too high up) the dogs will, at some point, turn to you to help them, the wolf never will.

          • Stephanie

            Hmm, you haven’t met some of the dogs I’ve had the pleasure of owning at some point. They all had intelligence that would prove your point moot.

          • Toshtego

            I do not agree with that. Some breeds have a social hierarchy. My Alaskan Malamute was one of those. Interaction with other dogs at the park meant establishing who was Alpha, who was Beta and who was to be the Omega dog. Usually, all of this was settled with a few sniffs and some play interaction.

          • SmarterThanYou

            What imaginary studies have you been reading? Dogs are 100% pack animals?

          • Crysania

            Oh yes. Silly me. I didn’t realize I was reading imaginary books and imaginary articles by imaginary people like Raymond Coppinger and Jean Donaldson. Gosh silly me. I guess that’s why your name on here is “SmarterThanYou.” I sure have been put in my place now!

          • Eleanor Jacobs

            yes, (and this is a real question) aren’t they more dangerous when they “snap” given the jaws and style of fighting? and given that some owners seem to be so lenient with them because they were abused or because there is so much prejudging against pits. frankly i don’t trust any dog 100%. and it seems to come from pit owners that their dog “would never…” and i’ve had foundlings, purebred dogs and shelter pups so i’ve had a bit of experience with pups. know this i don’t hate any breed, but i do definitely worry more when a pit or rottie (or similar breeds) get into a mix. and yes, i have a Rottweiler- German Shepard mix that I adopted 14 months ago.

          • Angela

            Eleanor, I appreciate you asking the question as it shows you are willing to learn so thank you! You are partly correct, but again it comes down to responsible ownership. All breeds have their traits, as I’m sure you know with your Rottie-Shepard. Pitties are no different. My female is extremely strong, and the female of the breed has more of a tendency to not let go during a fight. Yes, she could do a lot of damage IF provoked and IF I were to be irresponsible and place her in positions where she would have to defend herself. As a responsible Pittie owner, you must be aware of your breeds genetics and situations – just as with a Rottie or Shepard. It all comes down to responsible ownership and education! :-)

          • Scott Therrien

            people need to chain their chihuahuas

          • Lenore Kaibel

            I always carried mine. Love him, but they be mean little critters.

          • Slumlord

            Carrying your dog all the time is half the reason small dogs are aggressive and have confidence issues.

          • Lenore Kaibel

            Actually, my late Chi was a nine year old rescue when I got him, and hence pretty much was who he was. I carried him in crowds and around kids for the simple reason that he could not be trusted around them, and it is my responsibility to keep others safe from a cranky dog. I will not deny a tendency to treat small dogs like toys helps leads to the behavior issues of many chis. The other thing is over-breeding. My Poms, also rescues are rarely carried by me and came to me when they were younger they are not “aggressive” nor do they have confidence issues. Most small dogs have neither issue.

          • Ann Nonomiss

            actually, i’ve always had big dogs, & the past few years been the recipient of 2 little ones. i never carry them, but the chihuaha is still aggressive with the pitbull. i am surprised that he takes so much sh*t from him! god bless the pittys. ;)

          • Karen

            I said I wasn’t going to do it… you *should* be worried about a pit!
            https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.173059916187205.1073741830.172467419579788&type=1 (in case it isn’t clear, the pit in those pictures savagely attacked the boy in the pictures)
            http://www.babybeaufoundation.org/my-story/
            http://www.babybeaufoundation.org/rep-waites-and-mrs-rutledge-discuss-bully-breed-legislation/
            http://www.capitalbay.com/uk/297683-milly-anne.html
            http://www.azfamily.com/news/Mom-severely-injured-while-saving-toddler-from-dog-attack-226409391.html
            http://blog.dogsbite.org/2013/07/beyond-the-interview-essay-of-a-fatal-pit-bull-mauling.html

            Just a sampling – what do all these stories have in common, other than the obvious? The were all pits raised from pups in “loving family homes”. The pit nutters always blame the victims so they will tell you they were “abused”, “neglected”, “trained to fight”, “we don’t know what they were really do to the dogs”, “there were signs and they ignored them”, etc. But read the personal stories and watch the video and listen to these people. They’ve been on both sides of the fence.

            http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2027286/Darla-Napora-Pregnant-woman-dies-mauled-pet-dog-living-room.html – “…Napora was a member of Bay Area Dog Lovers Responsible About Pit Bulls, a group that does its best to convince people that pit bulls aren’t really that dangerous.” (I don’t think its “best” was good enough).

            http://occupymaulstreet.blogspot.com/2013/01/pit-bulls-should-they-be-called-life.html – you obviously won’t have enough time to read the hundreds of stories but if you click on each entry, it takes you to the news story. This is by no means a complete list! In case you’re worried about those troublesome chihuahaus which everyone knows are way more vicious than pits – http://www.jrn.com/kgun9/news/206703121.html
            http://wgno.com/2013/05/30/woman-who-lost-eye-ear-and-arms-recounts-pit-bull-attack/#axzz2pHs3WwNn – see the difference?

            https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_TQhn0TrPSba3p4NW5CT09ZX0E/edit – note “Table 3″

            https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_TQhn0TrPSbMUR0YzZvbHFnNWc/edit
            https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_TQhn0TrPSbdzhIVTdwUVFkUFk/edit

            http://www.scribd.com/doc/14810086/Heritability-of-Behavior-in-the-Abnormally-Aggressive-Dog-by-A-Semyonova

          • Scott Therrien

            maybe the boy shouldn’t be doing dumb shit… and from the time the dog’s a pup ANY DOG that’s when they learn things its all how you raise ANY dog. keep talking crap about pitbulls and ill have your account deleted

          • Karen

            I’m not “talking shit” A-H, I’m posting links. Blaming the victims? Typical nutter. I hiding information, another typical nutter tactic. But that’s getting harder and harder to do isn’t it with pit attacks in the news almost every. single. day. Word is getting out.

          • Nudge

            Thats your problem. Lets listen to media. They love a bad story. “Nutter?” What is this? you’re labeling a group of openminded, warmhearted group of individuals who are against descrimination with a rude term? Keep watching the news you’ll find out mankind kills thousands of animals on a daily basis. We are blaming “victims” who approach a dog they dont know, shove their hands in a dogs face, grab their ears: If a dog had just been punched in the head by a previous owner, this action will come on as threatening. And a lot of owners say “Please dont crowd my dog” and what doesnt the stranger say? “Oh no! Its ok! I have dogs too!” People are stupid and they dont listen.

          • Karen

            A large number of pit bull attacks and murders come from loving family pets, attacking the very family members they were raised with.
            http://17barks.blogspot.com/2013/03/a-question-about-pit-bull-owners.html
            http://17barks.blogspot.com/2013/08/what-happened-to-gavin.html

            “The media” reports severe and fatal dog maulings; that is their job. It isn’t their fault almost all of these involve pit bulls.

          • Nudge

            They JUMP on the words “pit bull” and “attack” because it draws viewers. If a lab does it, nobody cares. Because its a lab. Again, like I said before, hundreds of storis that go viral online about pitbulls saving people. But it doesnt draw viewers so the media doesnt talk about it.

          • TattooedLittleMiss

            Except they do a shitty job of it, since they almost never report the hundreds of attacks a year committed by America’s favorite breeds: labradors and retrievers.

          • Guestie

            Couldn’t ever be the case that the family said it was a “loving family environment” and it was, say, slightly less than? “Well, I did beat the dog a lot. But he never showed any aggression until he did!”

          • Guest

            Karen,

            I’ve been raising rescued pits for years. Its not the breed. You are part of the group of idiots that has fallen into the “what’s in” category. For years it was german shepherds, then rottweilers, the dobermans, etc. Please grow up and learn to think on your own. If I thought it would do a lick of good, I’d waste my time pulling up more pages than you have of a single dog breed that has done way more damage to children than any pits have, but I know it won’t do any good. Just please do yourself a favor and reduce your stress level, and let go of your anger towards pits.

          • Karen

            Please tell us during those years that the German Shepherds were “in” how many people they killed? How many people lost limbs and family members to them? When Rottweilers were “in”, how many people did they kill? Dobermans? Heck, you don’t even have to narrow it down to the years they were “in” – just tell us how many humans those breeds have killed *combined*.

          • jennifer

            http://www.thedogpress.com/Columns/Dog-BiteStatisics-09_Jade.asp

            take a read on statistics of overall dog bites and I will quote “Therefore, it is at least a hundred thousand times more likely that a “Pit Bull” will be killed by a HUMAN, than the other way around.”
            I use to be afraid of pit bulls myself until I met a few myself in shelters, rescues, and living in family style homes. They are a wonderful animal and yes they are not for everyone to handle or raise. So education on the breed is the key here, not just slamming a dog breed because they have gotten a lot of negative press.

          • Karen

            Who cares about “overall dog bites”? I care about the statistics for life-altering maulings and fatalities. Yes, many dogs bite and the majority of dog bites don’t even require a trip too the doctor. A few more require a trip but maybe a course of antibiotics are needed, or in some cases, even stitches. But you don’t lose your freaking BODY parts or LIFE to “other dogs”. Every 5.4 (?) days someone loses a body part to a pit bull; every 14 days, a person is killed by a pit bull; every 1.2 (?) days a pit bull is shot by an officer. These stats come from the 2011 study called “Mortality, Mauling, and Maiming by Vicious Dogs”.

          • Little

            Every dog has a fatality statistic, every dog is capable of killing. It’s just a fact.

          • Mike Duvall

            Luckily enough, the German Shepard that went for my throat did not succeed. I was able to get my hand up in time so that it only got my hand and chin. Some plastic surgery later and you can hardly see the injury. The sad thing is, I had pet that German Shepard before. I’ve also been bitten by numerous Chihuahuas and miniature Dobermans, but never any of the pit bulls I’ve been around. Animals are individuals, just like people. You cannot judge a whole breed based on the actions of a few.

          • TattooedLittleMiss

            I don’t believe there is ever a bad dog, but I’ very wary around small breeds. Owners of small dogs tend to be lazy, compared to owners of larger, heavier dogs. They think that because they can scoop their pet up and carry it around in a purse that it doesn’t need to be trained. Every time I’ve been bitten by a dog, it’s either been my fault (golden/lab mix, boxer) or a small dog that wasn’t being minded by its owner (too many to count).

          • Motpourri

            Can I just add that I’ve been attacked by three dogs in my time and all three just happened to be different Golden Retrievers. Just to clarify, I didn’t do anything to knowingly provoke the dogs (unless getting the mail from my mailbox merits a dog attack). I also work at an animal shelter, which can be an incredibly stressful environment for the animals, and I’ve yet to encounter a mean pit. From my experience, they’re some of the most resilient and family-oriented dogs out there. Sure, a little hyper for my taste, but great dogs. I think it says a lot about the breed when they can withstand the stresses of kennel life for as long as they do and not become “kennel crazed”. But anyways, I’m pretty sure any dog has the propensity to wreck someone, especially when starved, baited, and abused like pits have been in the past. I think people are just a hundred times more willing to report pit attacks because the breed already has that bad rep as the “fighting dog” breed.

          • Sisu Power

            No, I think it’s because when it happens – more seldom or not – the damage is more alarming.

          • Janet B. Strunk

            When I was a child, there was a family 3 doors down from us that had 3 dobermans and 3 children. The dobermans attacked and maimed all three of the children on more than one occasion. The local police finally came to the home and shot all 3 dogs. . . . I am sure that isn’t the only time dobermans have attacked. Do I fear them or any other breed – no.

          • Dagummit

            And on the flip side, I was raised with 2 Dobermans and a Rottweiler. They were my playmates after school since I lived on a large piece of property and didn’t have neighborhood kids to go play with. Our dogs came from excellent breeders with stable dogs and we never had any aggression issues. I will never judge a dog’s aggression issue unless I know exactly what happened and why.

            I was attacked by a German Shepherd about 4 years ago now and, like you, I do not fear them or any other breed. That was one GSD. I know too many others who are sweet as pie to label them all aggressive just because one loose GSD was.

          • Karen
          • Nudge

            Shall I post the hundreds of links to stray pits saving children from potential pedophiles, dragging injured dogs out of a dangerous road, pushing their owners out of danger? Shot in the head for standing between their owner and a gunman? Sleeping by a baby’s bedside to keep it safe from harm? I can find the negatives of anything. I can list for you every poisonous catterpillar on the planet, doesnt mean you should run if you see a furry little guy clibing a tree branch

          • Nudge

            Maybe you should actually visit an animal shelter.

          • Karen

            Why? I visited one two weeks ago. I visit the same one a month before that. In another month, I’ll probably be visiting it again. What about it?

          • Nudge

            I volunteered at one for 2 years. 50% of them were pit bulls. I’ve been snapped at by a total of 5 dogs; One was a chihuahua, one was a lab, 2 mix breeds… 1 was a pit bull. He was the sweetest thing, until I brought out a leash. I learned about his story later on. He’d been tied to a fence since he was a puppy. 2 years. They’d just peeled a chain out of his neck and after healing was ready for adoption, but they’d forgotten to label his cage. He wasn’t aggressive towards me; just the leash. that was the only pit bull, after hundreds I’d worked with, that ever gave me problems. And the aggression was not towards me. Once the leash was out of sight I sat down, and he curled against my leg and licked my hand, tail slapping the floor in happiness.

          • Karen

            Oh, I see why you thought I should visit a shelter! Well I’ve wanted to help out with fostering for awhile but have never done so because I refuse to support any shelter that puts blood sport dogs out into the community, and with families as pets. I stopped donating money, towels, food, and various other things I used to give. I stopped attending their fundraisers. And I won’t help with any of their efforts if they are adopting out pits. I feel it’s highly unethical to be touting these dogs as “family pets”, especially given how many children are killed by these “pets” each year. I decided to go with breed specific rescues when I finally located this rescue organization that doesn’t do pit bulls! Of course if that ever changes, my work with them is done.

          • Laryssa

            Chihuhuas are the most aggressive little pain in the ass dogs I’ve ever encountered. They have done more damage to me than any of the pitbulls are the shelter I VOLUNTEER for. Half of them have stories that breaks my heart, and they are still sweet. While half the toy breeds are just down right mean.
            Pull your head out of your ass.

          • Karen

            Darned dangerous chihuahuas! http://www.jrn.com/kgun9/news/206703121.html And see, the media doesn’t just post pit bull attacks!

          • Guestie

            A chichuahua could still maim or kill a small child. Really, what is your mental capacity? You are amusing.

          • Guestie

            What would the world do without crazies like Karen?
            Keep it real, Karen.

          • Angela Chaisson

            So there is hope then?

          • Angela Chaisson

            Impressive. Really. I’m in awe.

          • Nudge

            When a dog is “In” guess who wants them? Agressive people, for agressive reasons. They overbreed them, abuse them, and mishandle them.

            Every dog is different. What they are taught to fear is what they fear.

          • JewelChick

            If a dog of any kind attacks someone, it’s the owner who should be put down.

          • Michael Balog

            As a Retired Police Officer. I have had 2 K 9 Police Dogs that were Shepherds, and 2 K 9 Police Dogs that were Dobermans. The Dobermans were Easier to train, Less Hyper than Shepherds, Didn’t Shed as Much and Didn’t Stink with Wet. NONE of My Dogs, including Labs, Shepherds or Dobermans EVER Attacked Any Child or Adult, The Police Dogs were Not Agressive, were Better Behaved than Most People’s Kids in Public. I have a Doberman now, She is Very Sweet and is my Service Dog. She saved my Life 6 times. She NEVER Bit a Child, or Adult. She did however Prevent me from getting Mugged one dark night while walking down a city sidewalk. The Dog is Totally Loyal to me, She has been thru 3 Academies. Even Patrolled Pease AFB with me while on duty. No Incidents. She has helped find stolen kid’s bikes some bully threw over an embankment into a small river, As well as preformed other tasks. IF you Train ANY Dog to be Mean, Aggressive, it will respond in kind. I have come across Dangerous Dogs because they were being used by Dangerous People who were Criminals. Just thought I would ADD my Comments Based on my Experience.

          • Karen

            Why aren’t pit bulls used by police officers as K9 units in the same capacity that Shepherds, Dobes, and in some areas Giant Schnauzers, or even Bouviers in some places? Are there any police forces in the world where they are commonly used as K9 units? I know they use them for bomb and drug detection, but why aren’t they a common dog used for actual police partners? I would suspect (actually, I *know*) that your dogs are trained to not only attack, but to immediately stop on command. And the guarding/schutzhund dogs have been bred for these specific tasks for generations (just as blood sport breeds have been bred for theirs).

          • Nudge

            Actually, its becoming a much larger practice to use pits. they are much more durable than Shepards. But shepards were BRED for police work. That was theor purpose, therefore they are used.

            Also, Any of those recorded bite statistics are inacurate, because I guarantee you, 60% of people cant distinguish a pit from a mastiff, boxer, bulldog, or bull terriers.

          • Carrie Hatfield

            That and due to media hype, people are more likely to say it was a pit or pit mix even when they genuinely aren’t sure. It’s ridiculous.

          • Maggie Magrodnyc

            They don’t use pit bulls because they are too PEOPLE FRIENDLY, you damn moron. And therefore less inclined to be aggressive to someone they are sent to attack. And ANY pit can be trained to stop attacking on command. The problem with pit bulls isn’t the dog, but the kind of losers they attract that train them to be aggressive.

          • Karen

            ROTFLMAO! Best. post. yet! I have to screen shot this one and share!

          • The Knight Who Says Ni

            Well Karen, screen shot this: You are an ignorant moron. Yes, I just jumped the argument straight to insults, because its the only language people like you understand. Your misinformation on this thread is the exact same BS that perpetuates this stigma related to Pits. I’ve seen firsthand other breeds attack people. I’ve even read stories where those cute, loving breeds such as Labs have done it. It’s no secret that Pits are the preferred breed for fighting, but I’ve seen Pits be the most loving as well. If it is so engrained into their breed…why are some more gentle than a poodle? When are people like you going to realize the person handling the dog has far more influence than this so-called “attack temperament” or something that people like you insist on. Now…police DO, in fact, use Pits for various activities. They just aren’t the most popular for most activities. Nowadays all kinds of dogs are used depending on the activities. Certain dogs have heightened abilities. Beagles are the most popular at airports for sniffing out drugs and/or explosives. Shepherds are faster than Pits and almost as strong…and are the preferred choice for chasing down escaping suspects. Bloodhounds are the preferred choice for search and rescue. The list goes on and on. Learn a thing or two before you start spewing diarrhea of the tongue and look like a moron.

          • Donna Cooper-Collins

            Karen, just so you know, not that it will really matter because you hate the breed so much, but pits were actually considered nanny dogs because they were so reliable and gentle with children, here is a link that will educate you on that. http://www.ywgrossman.com/photoblog/?p=676 Here is a small sampling of the article “Astoundingly, for most of our history America’s nickname for Pit Bulls was “The Nanny Dog”. For generations if you had children and wanted to keep them safe you wanted a pit bull, the dog that was the most reliable of any breed with children or adults.”

          • Karen
          • Donna Cooper-Collins

            I have a red nose pit and rhodesian ridgeback mix right now who is 5 months old and the biggest sweety ever. I have had pit mixes and pits throughout my life time and they make perfect companions. I had a pit and sharpei mix and you want to know what worried the vet the most about her?? She was part Shar Pei and my vet said they were more vicious than a pit and out of all the years she has been a vet the only time she has been bitten has been by a Shar Pei. There are more attacks by other dogs than pits and yet all you hear about are the pits. There are also more stories about the good deeds pits have done than there are horror stories but we don’t get as much attention paid to those stories because they only want to hear the bad shit that happens not the good. Chihuahuas are more prone to attack than a pit, hell a Shar Pei is more prone to attack than freaking pit. Every pit I have ever had growing up has been loyal, loving and yes protective but never have I had one attack or bite me. I have been attacked and bitten by other breeds but I still don’t blame the breed I blame THE OWNERS. It is the owner who makes the dog it does not matter what the breed is.

          • Linda A Victory

            I shared the article and my friends came up with a great suggestion. Will the author of this article write a similar one for parents of small children including tops tips on teaching children how to approach dogs. I think this could benefit many. Thank you!

          • jennifer

            why do you have to be such a moronic troll baiting bitch. take your opinions and your fears and shove them up your ass.

          • Karen

            And yes, they do attract losers. No doubt about that! There is absolutely no trait, other than that of blood sport, that can be found in a pit bull that can’t be found in dozens of other breeds, without the inherent danger to society. So yeah, pits attract a certain element.

          • Maggie Magrodnyc

            Right, aren’t you the clever one. You know damn well I meant the people who use them for fighting. I adopted my pit bull from the shelter, I have never trained him to fight or be aggressive to anyone. I adopted him because I grew up with the breed and know the GOOD side of them that IGNORANT people such as yourself try to pretend do not exist. My dog is nothing but a COMPANION animal. and a loyal, well behaved and friendly (to both humans and animals) companion at that. You seriously need to get a life, you miserable troll. Screenshot that.

          • Laryssa

            Actually you idiot. Pits are known for being family oriented and more likely to be good kid dogs.
            Please, do us all a favor and just shut up.

          • TattooedLittleMiss

            Except that dozens of other breeds were bred for similar uses as pitbulls and you’ve raged against none of them, yet. Pitbulls are not the only breed that originated in the fighting ring. They weren’t even the first. They’re actually very new, compared to breeds like English bulldogs and shar peis. But they are more people-oriented than both those breeds. They were BRED to be. Humans originally began mixing other breeds into the bulldog line to try and create an animal that could be more easily handled and be trusted with crowd if it got in among an audience. Unlike guard dogs, like mastiffs and boxers, pitbulls attach themselves to people and other animals. They won’t guard a yard or a house, but they’ll die for their person or another animal they’ve become attached to.

          • Carrie Hatfield

            Pit bulls were bred to be dog aggressive, not people aggressive. They wanted a dangerous dog that would kill another without any question, but that they could handle safely. Pit bulls nowadays are the ultimate people pleasers. They will do ANYTHING to make their owners happy. If being aggressive and aggressive behaviors make their owners happy and they receive praise for it, they will actively participate in these behaviors on their own on a regular basis, because they know it makes their human happy. You teach them that you hate these behaviors and that they aren’t ok, they’re a baby on their back for you and will love you to death. My service dog is a APBT and she is amazing at her job,and because of her desire to please, she was highly trainable.

            Don’t get me wrong. I don’t believe all pit bulls are suited for service work. Just like not all labs are and not all GSDs are. Temperament testing is key. Each dog is evaluated individually to determine their suitablity for the work. More dogs don’t make the cut than do.

          • NJ Pit Mom62

            That is absolutely true. The reason why pitbulls make bad police dogs are because they are not aggressive. If you look at articles when you’re looking for a “guardian” dog, they always tell you not to get a pitbull because they’re goofy and just want to be your friend. It’s all these morons out there that play into the media hype and don’t try to meet/greet a pitbull owned by a responsible pit owner. I owned all different dog breeds in my lifetime and a pit has got to be the best dog. And the reason why some statistics show more pit bulls bite is because they lump all other dogs that look like pits into this category. Some lab, and boxer mutts have been mislabeled. And isn’t it ironic that most news articles regarding a dog bite don’t picture the actual dog? They use some photo sample of a vicious looking pit.

          • Angela Chaisson

            Excellent point! I wonder if Karen has ever actually been around pits or worked with them? I’m guessing no, because anyone who has would agree with you, Maggie.

          • Michael Balog

            That my Dear is YOUR opinion. If you had Been thru the Police Academy and in Law Enforcement, You would know the Answer to your questions. I Have Seen Airdales that were Trained as Bomb Sniffing Dogs with FBI Agents when I was on a case involving suspected explosive devices and the Agent came into the Elevator with an Airdale with the “K 9 Bomb Dog” Vest on him. There are Specific Dog Breeders and Academies that Military, Police and Special Service Security Dogs are Obtained and trained with selected officers. Normally you get the dog assigned to you and you keep him or her for the expected “service life”, The dog goes with you everywhere including home. After he “Retires” you get to keep the dog or if if you retire, the Dog gets reassigned. During the end of the Vietnam War Thousands of MP. K 9 Dogs were Put to Sleep as they were separated from the Soldiers who were trained to serve with them. After that there was an up roar from Veterans Groups and Dog Lovers, so that was Changed and the Dogs were Retired instead of being killed.

          • Karen

            That wasn’t an opinion; it was a question, which you failed to answer.

          • Michael Balog

            I don’t have the time nor inclination to do a Tit for Tat Analysis. Re read what I have Posted and MOVE ON. People like YOU At least Should have the Courtesy to Post Your Correct Name instead of
            hiding behind the Keyboard like a Rank Amateur. I am Not
            interested in Further Communication. RSA 382-A-1207 , RSA 382 – A – 103 United States Code. / Uniform Commercial Code. Without Prejudice.Happy New Year, Have a Nice Life… BYE..

          • Angela Chaisson

            Have a little respect, would you? Policemen put their lives on the line every day for people, including ungrateful, rude ones like you. Shame on you.

          • Cali Holtzinger

            Wow, where do you get your information??? http://workingpitbull.com/

            http://outofthepits.org/our-dogs/law-enforcement-dogs/
            There are 2 I know for a fact there are many many more, I don’t have time or the desire to further try to convince you to put your hate aside for a second and look at them with an open mind. However I would like to say I have been in the pitbull community along with thousands of people that I personally have met, that would never and have never ever trained their dogs to attack. That comment was completely asinine and really makes you look foolish.

          • Angela Chaisson

            Is there anything you don’t know? I would think a police officer who has actually worked with K-9 dogs might know a bit more about it than you.

          • Karen

            Maybe – but he didn’t answer my questions did he. He did everything *but* answer the questions. I wonder why? And no, it *isn’t* because they are “too friendly”.

          • Angela Chaisson

            Maybe? So you are saying maybe you do know more about K-9 dogs and how they are used and trained than a K-9 handler? Your ego has no bounds, m’dear.

          • Karen

            Wow – you’re really having a hard time with this aren’t you? Poor thing. I don’t know what he knows. He mainly posted a defensive, overly emotional, yelling rant as if someone were talking about his personal dogs (which they weren’t). His rant really had nothing to do with what was being discussed so I’m not really sure what his point was. It was just bizarre. The only thing I’m sure of is that he *really* likes using capital letters but doesn’t seem to be very clear on their proper use. Perhaps English isn’t his first language? He also didn’t state he trained his dogs. I’m friends with several police officers and know two with K9 Units. While both had to have training WITH their canine partners, neither actually did the main training themselves. Their dogs were trained professionally and then paired with the officers. So while he *may* know more about his individual dogs and the specific tasks they were trained to do, I don’t really know what he knows about dogs. I asked him very specific, but simple, questions which he refused to answer.

          • Angela Chaisson

            No, I’m not having a hard time with it, I’m having a hard time with you. You talk a lot about how much you know about dogs but back it up with media reports and internet searches. (And I find your use of asterisks to emphasize a word a tad immature – most grownups use quotation marks.) Look back through the comments, Karen, I’m not the only one who thinks you’re a bit (or a lot) unbalanced and have an inflated opinion of your dog training abilities. And your ignorance and unwarranted fear of pit bulls (even though we’re not talking about them here) is really intriguing. You seem to have quite an intense hatred for the breed. Which is just as well since that means you will leave them for true dog trainers and rescuers to handle. And I do wish you’d post a picture – it’s awfully hard to relate to an icon. And you’re pretty hard to relate to as it is. Or are you really a 12-year-old boy with a bad temper whose mom won’t let him have a dog? I mean, it’s possible, because, hey, this is the internet.

          • Karen

            You look back at my comments, you’ll see a lot of people agree with me. Quotation marks should never be used for emphasis; it isn’t grammatically correct. It would be more appropriate to use italics to emphasize but I don’t know if that’s possible in this format, not do I care to figure it out. Using asterisks for emphasis is not uncommon at all.

            Not only do I have personal knowledge of pit bulls, I’ve spent countless hours reading and learning about them. I do have an intense hatred for the breed and would love nothing more than to see them banned completely (like some other countries) or at least regulated into extinction. They are a public menace and they have absolutely no trait that can’t be found in dozens of other breeds, without the inherent risk to society. They serve no purpose in this day and time. I encourage as many people to research the statistics and get the facts about them and not fall for the pro-pit propaganda machine, heavily driven by the dog-fighting industry. The easiest way to convince people is just encourage them to sign up for Google alerts for pit bull attacks. One person was considering adopting one, thanks to the efforts of the shelter, and after 2 weeks of getting those emails, she said she would never even allow her children around any of them again. I’ve withdrawn all financial, volunteer, and donations items support from any shelter that puts pit bulls into the public as pets. I write senators, congressman, and local politicians encouraging them to put public safety above the right to own fighting breeds and encourage others to do the same. I just recently provided some resources to a woman from the dog park whose condo complex is being terrorized by a pit bull. They are looking to sue to get him out. I provide information – I don’t write the statistics, I don’t write the stories, I don’t write the studies, I don’t write the headlines; I merely provide the information.

            An acquaintance from the field where I take my dog for off-leash play thought I was a little “crazy” and “over the top” because every time this other guy came with his mutant, I quickly snatched up my dog in my arms and high-tailed it out of there. The pit owner was always calling out “it’s ok, she’s friendly. She loves to play”. F- that! NO WAY. I would look back over my shoulder and see the pit and my friend’s terrier playing and frolicking. My friend would tell me how upset and offended nutter dude would be and he’d say I really didn’t need to worry because she was “so sweet” and she was “so gentle” with his small dog. I would reiterate that you can’t trust a pit and there was no way in hell I’d have one around my dog. I left for Europe for a few months. I returned and eventually ran into the guy again at the field. His dog was very different. He told me how one day the two dogs were playing like they had dozens of times before, while the two men chatted and watched them. With no warning or provocation, the pit bull silently attacked the small terrier. He said it took a moment to process because the pit’s tail was wagging the whole time. It took both men to get the pit off. His dog survived but required several thousand dollars (!) worth of medical expenses. Apparently pit nutter man took the dog home, put it in a crate, and had it euthanized the first thing the next morning. He had two small children the dog had been raised with (along with a cat) and he would have sworn on his life *his* pit would never have hurt a fly. It was a female, adopted as a puppy, spayed at 8 months, and had been through obedience classes. It was a shock to him because he realized how easily it could have been one of his kids.

            Apparently pit nutter guy now tells everyone he will never have another and never trust one. He was very remorseful and paid every cent of the medical bills. Now, that’s two more on our side! As my friend said, “we said after it happened, turns out she wasn’t so crazy after all.” He said he wished a hundred times over he had listened to me. The funny thing is, there were a couple of times I saw those dogs frolicking so happily, I questioned if maybe I should let my guy stay and play! But I knew better because my last Rhodesian had her muzzle skin completely bitten through by a “friendly” pit bull that belonged to the stable owner. She did it through the pickets of a fence (because I had the good sense to let them say hello through the fence first to see how it would go) and her tail was wagging the whole time. Ultimately that same pit bull (excuse me, “American Staffordshire Terrier”, the owner was always so adamant that it wasn’t a pit bull) bit its owners thumb off. As in OFF. Complete. Gone. The same dog she always had around her preschool niece and nephew! It seems like almost everyone you meet has a pit bull story.

            There are many, many more doing the same thing and I am because you know what, the public is getting FED UP with story after horror story that involves pit bulls. They hear it’s all how you raise them, and then they read of the family pits killing the child. They read it’s only bad owners, but then they see pits of regular people doing horrible things. People are really starting to see them for what they really are. And now that victims are collaborating together to raise public awareness, I think you’ll see even more people angry that these mutants are allowed in our society. The obsession with owning a blood sport dog is really disturbing. http://maxgold20.tumblr.com/post/70783956506/my-theory-on-why-pitbull-advocates-are-nutters

            Yes, I suppose it is possible that I’m a 12 year old boy whose mother won’t let him have a dog, but I’m not looking for a relationship. Sorry.

          • Karen

            “A MOTHER has warned parents their children are never safe with family pets after a Staffordshire Bull Terrier puppy attacked her daughter leading to part of her leg being amputated.”

            ““I am a mum with four children, if he had showed any signs of aggression, he would’ve been out,” she said.

            “The day before it happened he was curled up on a chair with her cuddling. Even minutes before it happened he was asleep on the living room floor.”
            http://www.daventryexpress.co.uk/news/local/girl-loses-foot-following-dog-attack-at-home-1-4700905

          • Angela Chaisson

            I see I’ve touched a nerve. Don’t take it personally – I just don’t care for hate-mongering – toward dogs or toward people. You scare me … you really do.

          • TattooedLittleMiss

            Don’t ever dare call yourself a dog or any animal lover. You’re disgusting.

          • Karen

            http://17barks.blogspot.com/2014/01/dog-attack-report-by-breed-december-2013.html The link at the bottom gives you details by specific breeds. Note the 3rd paragraph under the “Analysis” portion of the report on that source link. Read it very carefully. Then read it again.

          • Kat

            I can only imagine how you feel about mosquitoes.

          • Kellie

            my grandson is ADHD and you know who his calming support is a pit mix. my daughter has raised this dog with the kids ans when the boys both get out of control the pit seems to have a way to calm them down, and yes the pit is registered in CA as a working dog. Any dog can be aggressive and it is all dependent on how the dog is raised and treated on an everyday basis. I was worried at first but know that the pit is great for the boys, by the way my daughter is a single parent.

          • Scam

            There’s actually absolutely no service dog registry anywhere. Every single place that claims to be a service dog registry is a scam, so be mindful of that. There’s no way to register any animal as a service animal. It’s all taken in good faith. Those people just steal your money and pretend to be offering a service that isn’t real.

          • Nudge

            Uh, no. Its a title. Every service dog has to pass a test and recieve a certiffication through the AKC (America Kennel Club) Which is a legit association.

          • Michal Ilana

            That is incorrect! The AKC has nothing to do with service dogs, Here’s the laws, read up. http://www.ada.gov/service_animals_2010.htm

            California does have a tag they give out that offers extra protection under state law, usually through county or city animal control. I am a volunteer service dog educator and advocate and have been doing this for about 4.5 years. Really, read the laws.

          • Carrie Hatfield

            Uh no. They do NOT. ADA law states that NO “certification” is necessary. Owner training is 100% legal in the US. Educate yourself on the law. http://www.ada.gov/service_animals_2010.htm

          • Dagummit

            You are thinking of the Canine Good Citizen test. That has nothing do do with service dogs. That is there for anyone who wants to do it. All three of my pet dogs are working towards getting their CGC. While it is a good starting goal for SD owner trainers, it is, by no means, the final test of obedience that a SD should have to pass. There is no actual test but the CGC really is just basic obedience. While it’s a nice title for any AKC registered dog to have, it really and truly has nothing to do with SDs.

          • Karen

            http://foxnewsinsider.com/2013/12/24/dog-fraud-growing-concerns-about-impostor-service-dogs
            All you have to do is read the comments under an article about a pit bull ban or restrictions to see the number of people admitting to and/or advising others to get their pit registered as a “service” dog so it can’t legally be prevented from wherever they want it to be. You see it ALL THE TIME, in pit forums as well. It’s common advice. We’ve already seen at least one mauling by a “service” pit and one by a “therapy” pit. There is no low these owners won’t sink to to keep blood sport breeds where they don’t belong.

          • Nudge

            Dogs have to pass at least 5 different behavior and advanced obedience tests in order to become a therapy dog. I am on my way to that with mine, because I want her to help people and her breed. I’ve seen hundreds of “mauling” stories by HUMAN police officers. Mistakes are made, but tis not the breed.

          • Karen

            I know exactly what needs to be done to have a dog certified as a therapy dog – I’ve done three of them. They aren’t that challenging. My current dog got his one week after his first birthday (because they have to be at least one) and he was an intact terrier.

          • Guest

            You are a CUNT. I hope that was loud and clear.

          • Jessica Pancakes Patton

            Thats ok, blame all pitbulls for what some of them have done, just let them be shipped off to be abused more or kill them, there not YOUR dogs so it doesn’t matter, other peoples dogs don’t matter anymore.
            By the way, that was sarcasm, i just wanted to tell you that so your thoughtless and cold brain could understand. Have fun killing innocent dogs.

          • Michael Balog

            @ Scam. Happy being a Troll Right ? FYI My Doberman is a Service Dog, Been Thru Three Academies and is Registered as a Service Dog in my City Hall were I live,. It’s On her Dog License. Do yourself a Big Favor Before you Further Make a Fool out of your Self and READ the ADA ACT. Americans With Disabilities Act. There are sections mentioned several times regarding service dogs and the Public. Example: State Of New Hampshire, Governor’s Commission on Disability. Page 2: Next to last Paragraph: You may Not Ask questions about the person’s disability, You MAY NOT ASK to be Shown a Certification or a Special ID Card as proof of the animals training. You may NOT ask a Guest with a Service Animal to use a specific entrance, exit or area of the business. Further Suggest you READ the FEDERAL ADA Act, and the Federal Air Carrier Access Act of 1986 (ACAA) The Act Requires Air Carriers to permit Service Animals to accompany people with disabilities on flights ( 14 CFR 382.55(a) Fair Housing Act of 1988 (FHA). K9Man.com Summary of Federal Laws regarding Service Animals. U.S. Dept. of Justice Letter, providing specific information about the legal requirements regarding individuals with disabilities who use service animals, Prepared by the Task Force to assist businesses in complying voluntarily with the ADA and applicable state laws. Suggest you also contact the nearest U.S. Attorney’s Office and / or State Attorney’s Office, ADA Desk. Become Better informed and Educated about the topic Before you Further Make a Fool out of yourself in Public. BTW, I am retired LEO and USAF Officer. And my “Service Dog” has preformed brilliantly on missions and assignments.

          • Karen

            And this needs to change; this is how so many dog owners are abusing the system and making it harder (and more dangerous) for those with legitimate, trained service dogs.

          • Michael Balog

            Don’t Get Me Started; As Far as I know, The American Kennel Club is just Civilian Dog Show / Dog Owners Association. They are Not the Experts in Service Dogs nor Registration. Show me the Law. Period.

          • Dagummit

            The SD handlers I know don’t WANT there to be a registry. They want to be able to go to the grocery store or to Target and not be asked for ID for what is supposed to be the equivalent of medical equipment like a wheelchair. They hate the fakers but they would rather deal with that than have to show ID just to do things everyone else does. Of course, I cannot speak for all SD handlers but I am good friends with many handlers and the IDs are a sore spot for a large number of them. I am considering a SD for myself and, while I haven’t fully made the decision to go that route yet, I know that I don’t want to have to show ID to get into every place I need to go just to run my simple errands. It’s not their business why I would have a SD with me. My disability is my business and mine alone.

          • 23333339v2

            yeah good for you, Michael, but anyone with $45 can go online, buy a service dog vest AND the federal certification card that goes with it and….voila….a service dog is created (AND no one can legally ask you what functions it performs as a service dog). There are definitely more scams than legit trainers (anyone who thinks they have a service dog and paid less than $20,000 for the training most likely has a very nice dog with a really cool vest….and an ID card. period).

          • Michael Balog

            AND Anyone who has to Pay $20,000 for such a Service Dog. Needs To have their Head Examined. That’s the Real Problem ~ Corporate Greed. People who’re Not Financially Able to Afford what is really necessary in their lives are Raked over the Coals by Big Pharma, Big Insurance Companies, Big Health Care Networks and in this case Self Promoting Agenda Outfits who Over Charge People when it is not necessary. Or you have people who have to apply to other Charitable Organizations who Put people thru a Maze just to connect the dots to get where they need to go. Meanwhile someone else’s palms are Greased to get them on a list to get in. With a Long Waiting Period. I know someone who needlessly Died waiting for a Transplant Because they were Lower Middle Class, A VET and had No family or “Group” to come to their aid either. Who Pray Tell Speaks For Them ? Just as I have investigated Faux Accident Claims that resulted in Scamming Insurance Companies and Govt. Agencies for Benefits not deserving of them. They go to an Modern Version of a Corporate Ambulance Chasing Law Firm and WaLa they get their Claim Processed for a LARGE Chunk of the Initial Govt. Payment. Again, Meanwhile the average person can’t possibly afford $ 20,000 worth of training. Who’s going to Write them a Check for the $ 20 K ??? Why can’t it be Done for much Less? After all, a Specialty Breeder can be found for the animal for much less than a Grand. Who gets the rest of the $ 20 K then? See what I mean. Over Inflated Pricing, Cost Vs Benefit Analysis. Of Course another Solution is to Cancel All Foreign Aid. Bring all the Troops Home and tell the rest of the World Charity Begins at Home. Therefore WE will Take Care Of Our Own People First.

          • 23333339v2

            Not sure I can disagree with you. But that’s the going rate. To train a dog to “sniff” an oncoming epileptic attack ain’t easy, of course, and it takes well over a year to achieve reliable results (sometimes even longer if you factor in the evaluation period). I’m in the blindness “business” and the only reason guide dogs and seeing eye dogs (two different organizations with very different ideas on what the dog should be trained to do) are free is because they get huge donations every year that cover the costs. Plus training dogs for the blind really isn’t very difficult and is done in weeks or months – not years

          • onstagebabe04

            It’s actually impossible to train a dog to “sniff” an epileptic attack. No one knows what happens before one that a dog picks up on. The hope is that the dog will get to know their client well enough to know when they are about to have a seizure, but you can’t promise that. You can however train a dog to respond to a seizure by calling 911, getting medication, or getting help.

          • 23333339v2

            don’t know enough about it to comment either way, but I have seen a dog get very agitated (barking, growling, moving fitfully) just before the onset of an attack – when the owner was unaware of the impending problem. As for calling 911….I suppose if my dog had thumbs that would be not problem (just kidding). J

          • onstagebabe04

            Oh, yeah, I’m not saying that some dogs don’t know when their person is going to have a seizure or attack. They are definitely capable of doing so. It’s just that we can’t specifically train them to do so. It’s kind of something they pick up on their own.

          • 23333339v2

            Kind of like my Border herding. You can teach him to go left or right, etc…..but basically you can’t teach him to herd. It’s just in him(and not all borders have the instinct to the same degree).
            Sent from my iPad

          • ARTHUR H. NICANDER

            Don’t forget the annual shots, vet visits and food all have to be factored in also…..

          • Guest

            WOW..not to complain but I couldn’t read anything you said because you like To Use A Capital Letter For Every Single Word Which Makes It All Appear Like Everything Is A Business Name Or Book Title. -SORRY :/

          • Michael Balog

            Oh, I see Now, You’re another Progressive Whiner and PC Police Agent? I will Capitalize what ever I want and whenever I want. Called First Amend. of the U.S. Constitution. Freedom of Speech and Expression. IF you Don’t Like it, You have another of the Time Honored Traditions in the U.S.A. Called the Freedom to Leave. Troll Mensa Midget. You must be Bored sitting in your Mom’s Basement using your parents computer since the Blizzard Cancelled School. Go Do Your Homework or go to Bed. You’re Boring the Adults Here.

          • Drew Reid

            Yes, you are free to capitalize whatever you like.. Still makes you look retarded.

          • Michael Balog

            @ Drew Reid: Judge Not and Thou Shalt Not Be Judged. Period. Go Be Off with you. Troll Somewhere Else. You are OUT of Your League.

          • sonjixx

            Seriously who really gives a shit what you think …I am surprise you can even read at all…flip’n liberals will complain about anything.

          • Htims

            The Libs that, the Conservatives this. Oh shut up you asshole.

          • http://www.rglennnall.com/ glenn nall

            r u serious? fucking WHAAH. good God.

          • onstagebabe04

            Service dogs do generally take $20,000 to train. I am very involved with a service dog organization and am working towards earning a service dog trainer certificate. We provide our dogs at no cost to the client, but we do a ton of fundraising to be able to do this. The 20k includes the breeding, the care, the training, etc. And I think you just contradicted yourself. A service dog doesn’t have to have certification of any kind, you even quoted the ADA where it says that. No one can ask to see the certification of the dog, they just have to trust that you’re telling the truth and that it is a service dog. The only thing a person can ask is what tasks the dog can perform.

          • Carolyn Morrow Long

            Michael, you don’t need to use all caps to make your point. It just makes your posts hard to read.

          • Michael Balog

            Hi Carolyn,,, FYI, Just came inside from shoveling 16 inches of snow on the property and the neighbors property. Frost Bite, And Arthritis Don’t Mix Well with me. Didn;t Intend on Further Commenting Here.

          • Andrea Rosen

            Anyone who capitalizes the first letter of every word needs to have their head examined.

          • Amy Wilson

            in my state the prisons have a dog facility that trains these dogs, and i am pretty sure they don’t make money doing it

          • JewelChick

            Why all the extra caps?

          • Alysia

            His POINT,…. 23333339v2,….. is that there IS a LEGIT service dog registry…. not that there aren’t scams,…. And please show me where you found a price list for all the service dogs and how their starting going rate is 20K… Id love to see it,…

          • 23333339v2

            well, I know two people with service dogs – let’s see….oh yes – one of them is (wait for it)….me! And, of course I see others with their vests (see http://www.activedogs.com ). The vests on activedogs.com cost between $25 and $55 (the federal ID cards are extra – about $25). ANYONE can buy these.
            As for my service dog: it took almost 2 years for her to be evaluated and then trained – reliably – and I spent well over $20,000 (the vest was extra, by the way). Is my dog “registered?” Not that I am aware of. Not even sure where or….more importantly….why I would register her. She really isn’t capable of calling 911, so I don’t really understand the need or efficacy of a “national” registry – or any other registry, for that matter.

          • KJ

            Trolling, trolling, trolling…. trolling down the river!

          • Lars Huiras

            he said you can buythe vest and card, not the dog

          • Michal Ilana

            You keep talking about this legit service dog registry. Please educate all the service dog who deny it’s existence and tell us the name of this registry.

          • Carrie Hatfield

            Wrong. There is NO “federal certification”. The Department of Justice does NOT support or back any “service dog registries”, nor does it state any are “official”. Buying a piece of paper that says your dog is a “service dog” means NOTHING. All that proves is you know how to type a credit card into a box on a website. It is the TRAINING that makes your dog a service dog. That and you actually have to be legally disabled. If someone from a reputable training organization didn’t evaluate your dog IN PERSON to make sure they were ACTUALLY TRAINED like they are LEGALLY SUPPOSED TO BE, and they didn’t actually VERIFY your disability with your doctor, your dog isn’t “certified” as anything. You got scammed and wasted your money.

          • 23333339v2

            You right, Carrie. But when you think about it, what would a national (or local) registry actually do? Nothing. The bottom line is the training of the dog to help the disabled person deal with and life with their disability. And that’s worth whatever you feel it’s worth. If the dog can do what it is supposed to do, and you can afford it – then it’s all good. J
            Sent from my iPad

          • Dagummit

            While you are right about the bogus certifications, you are wrong about the cost of a SD. Some of the programs ask a LOT for their dogs but a SD doesn’t have to come from a program. Many go through private trainers who have a set rate for training SDs and it varies quite a bit depending on whether the owner is involved in the training and the dog is being taken for training sessions or if the trainer is the one looking for, purchasing, training, and boarding the dog. Others owner train. Some of the best SDs I have ever had the pleasure of knowing were trained by the handlers themselves. Some come from breeders and others from shelters. If a person is capable of training a SD and knows what to look for in a prospect dog, the SD’s training can cost the same as a pet dog’s training since they are doing it themselves. Owner training is becoming more and more popular as finances get harder. No matter whether a dog comes from a program, a private trainer, or an owner trainer you are going to have your awesome SDs and your SDs that have no business being in public.

          • 23333339v2

            I have a service dog that is trained to foresee a neurological condition before it happens. I have trained dogs (professionally) for 51 years – and there is no way an obedience trainer – no matter what level – can self-train a dog for neurological sensitivity. I guess it comes down to your definition of a service dog. I am the COO of one of the largest Blind & Visually Impaired non-profit agencies in the country – so we have lots of guide dogs on site – and I can tell you that the dumber the dog is – the better the guide dog he is (that’s why they use mostly Laboradors) – and the training can be completed in a couple of weeks. My service dog is a Border Collie and he would be the worst guide dog in the history of guide dogs. And his certification took almost 2 years (he is a dog with a vocabulary of over 200 words, so he is certainly no dummy).

          • Dagummit

            Your dog may be listed as a SD on her license but there is no actual registry for service dogs. The academy she came from or trained through may keep track of her and may have given you some paperwork on her but there is no actual SD registry. I HAVE read the ADA and I KNOW that there are no legit registries a SD is required to be registered with. Those that issue ID cards are scams and, frankly, hurt SD handlers. Those (fake or real) who show IDs everywhere they go to “prove” their dog is a SD make people think that SD handlers have to have ID on them for their dog. It has created a lot of access issues.

          • Adele Nolan

            sorry to say but every service dog MUST pass tests, what i got my guide dog (seeing eye dog) they had to pass tests from the time there were puppies and heck the team (dog/human) must pass a test before being allowed to go home. we where also give a photo ID card stating we were a work guide dog team and covered under the ADA laws.

          • 23333339v2

            Adele, sorry to say but you are wrong. A seeing eye dog (and a guide dog) are not service animals in the true sense – I am the COO at the SF Lighthouse for the Blind. Dogs working with the blind perform a service, but they are not, technically, service dogs. A service dog is trained to deal with medical emergencies or conditions (blindness and vision impairment are not “conditions.” It is the result of something – disease, birth condition, etc – but it is not, technically, a condition like epilepsy)

          • Carrie Hatfield

            ADA does not differenciate between “guide dogs” “hearing dogs” “service dogs” etc… they ALL fall under the definition of “service dog” http://www.ada.gov/service_animals_2010.htm

          • 23333339v2

            Right. The ADA doesn’t differentiate, but the world does (and, frankly, the dogs themselves are totally different – a guide dog, basically, is just a big dumb, well-trained, rather laconic pooch that doesn’t do much – nor is it supposed to do much. Totally different than a “medically trained” dog). Jerry
            Sent from my iPad

          • Dagummit

            I have never met a dumb guide dog. They have been just as intelligent than the service dogs I know. These dogs must be VERY intelligent. I don’t know what kind of guide dogs your organization is churning out for people but a guide dog should never be an unintelligent dog. These dogs become their handler’s eyes. They MUST be capable of intelligent disobedience even if their handler is telling them to do otherwise in order to not lead them into a dangerous situation. I am honestly flabbergasted that someone who claims to work with an organization thinks it is ok for a guide dog to be dumb.

          • 23333339v2

            wow. you seriously don’t know ANYTHING about the function of a guide dog (and no….we don’t “produce” guide dogs – some of our clients and workers use them….about 3% of blind people use dogs – that’s guide dogs and seeing eye dogs combined). They definitely are NOT their handler’s eyes. And a guide dog does NOT….EVER disobey the handler. It’s possible you have seen seeing eye dogs – and they do, in fact, have limited ability and training to make a decision – but not very much – and certainly not a life-threatening decision. Do you really think any dog can be trained in 4-6 weeks to make live-saving decisions? What Lassie movie are you watching?

          • 23333339v2

            Look – let me explain a bit. I don’t know how many guide dogs you have ever met (and if you live in the Eastern US you have met seeing eye dogs – not guide dogs). Was I harsh for suggesting they must be dumb? Possibly A BIT – but they must not be overly smart (or else they would all use Border Collies or Poodles, wouldn’t they). What they must be is friendly, laconic, and trainable to not question decisions by the handler. Blind people do not need a dog to cross a street (that’s what those annoying yellow pads are for). Blind people do better with cane training in order to avoid running into things than they would ever do with a dog. Now let’s do some numbers: Guide dogs has a “graduation” every three months (quarterly). That’s 12 weeks. It takes at least two weeks to train the dog to defecate in a prescribed manner. It takes 3-4 weeks for the blind person to meet and bond with the dog. That leaves 6 weeks to first evaluate the dog, adjust the dog to harness and non-harness travel and to train it. NOW would you like to trust your life to a dog who has had maybe 4 weeks of training? Of course not (not even a Border Collie could learn everything it needs to know to “save your life” in 4 weeks ). A guide dog is like an animated cane – only not as precise. People who use dogs like the companionship that is so important when you are blind (that’s why most dog users are totally blind – and most blind people are NOT totally blind). But other than stopping at corners, there really isn’t much that they do (and if you have a cane and know how to use it you will know where the corner is – and you can hear if the traffic is coming or not – and from which direction). I’m sorry if I burst some bubble – there is nothing to dislike about a guide dog (or other Laboradors – sweet dogs). But there is nothing heroic about them, either.

          • Dagummit

            Blindness is a disability and service dogs are there to mitigate a disability. As Carrie said, the ADA does not differentiate. They are all service dogs. All service dogs perform a service whether it be a diabetic alert dog, a psychiatric service dog for something like PTSD, a mobility dog, guiding the blind, etc.

          • 23333339v2

            Well, you obviously don’t know anything about the blind or the deaf/blind community. Yes, blindness, legally, is a handicap or a disability (depending on your level of Political Correctness). There is not a guide dog user or a seeing eye dog user (and yes….there is a very big difference between the two) who would ever say their dogs are service dogs

          • Carrie Hatfield

            Your ORGANIZATION required testing. THE LAW, however, does not. http://www.ada.gov/service_animals_2010.htm

          • Tina McCrory

            There is no national service dog registration or certification process in the US. When a service dog training organization says that they certify service dogs, it just means that the dog has met that particular organization’s standards. Different organizations can have different standards and tests for their dogs. None of this is required by ADA law, though. Many people owner train their service dogs and, while they may have their dog take the CGC or test them on the items on the Public Access Test, it’s just to make sure that the dog can do those things and act appropriately in public. Owner trained service dogs do not get certified and it’s perfectly legal according to the ADA.

          • Dagummit

            No, they do not. Guide dogs tend to be a little trickier to train so the vast majority of them come from organizations but service dogs can be for just about any disability and do not have to come from organizations. The average seeing impaired person probably does not have the knowledge or ability to train a guide dog so you will see MANY more of them come from organizations than you will other types of service dogs.

          • anonomy

            you need a service registered liscence in new york

          • Shodee

            Scam, you’re wrong about that. My boyfriend is a disabled Vietnam vet and his lab is certified by the VA as a “working dog” and it didn’t cost him a dime.

          • Michael Balog

            @Kellie, Please read my reply to “Scam” below. That may assist you in any further necessary debates…

          • Kathy Allen

            it is most defilnitely not ALL how they were raised. their breeding has just as much to do with their behavior.

          • Dagummit

            I absolutely agree. This does go for all breeds though. A dog bred by someone who just threw two dogs together has a MUCH higher chance of creating unstable dogs who have no business being out in public. When I go to buy a new pup, I make sure I research the breeder for a LONG time before committing. I like to get in touch with others who have bought dogs from my prospective breeder to ask them about their experiences with the breeder and the dog. I want my dogs, no matter the breed, to come from someone who keeps temperament in mind and is producing dogs that are friendly, happy, and stable.

          • Carrie Hatfield

            Solely providing “emotional comfort” does NOT make your dog a service dog. In fact, ADA specifically says it doesn’t. Please educate yourself on federal law. http://www.ada.gov/service_animals_2010.htm

          • http://www.rglennnall.com/ glenn nall

            right. from an ex-pitt hater (now I just think they’re ugly, but still sweet dogs), they’re also known as good nanny dogs, i’ve read. great with kids. I used to think like karen up there, until i learned to read.

          • Guestie

            To read, and to reason. Ex-Pit hater here, also. Gee, I wonder if there could be more reports of attacks from Pit-bulls because 1) there are tons of Pit bulls being bred by idiots and 2) they tend to report the attacking dog as pit even if it’s not. I saw enough reports from Golden Retrievers to change my mind about pits. And further, I’ve only ever been bitten by a dachshund. That was a long night in the emergency room.

          • Eleanor Jacobs

            they were known as good nanny dogs until people damaged the poor breed with breeding for attacking and fighting. and the “nanny” aspect was that they would guard the baby. sorry maybe before decades of idiots got ahold of the breed. not now.

          • Sondra

            They are very powerful dogs, so yes, they can do more damage…but there are plenty of other dogs that are just as aggressive. They are being badly bred by backyard breeders and people that don’t have the time for a high energy dog are getting them so they get all that energy built up and they are just so restless….not their fault. So glad you realize that now

          • Red

            Thanks Kellie, I myself have a pit mix and she is a wonderful dog. wouldn`t trade her for the world. and I know several pit mixes and I have had the privilege of know several pure pit. they are a wonderful breed. and thanks for pointing out that ANY DOG CAN BE AGGRESSIVE!!!! because people are ignorant to that fact. and do not want to understand that it`s not the breed, it`s the individual dog, and how it is raised and treated. a dog needs a leader.

          • KJ

            Your grandson has been diagnosed with ADHD, which likely isn’t really ADHD. More often than not, these kids are perfectly normal and the lack of discipline and knowledge has caused a need to drug kids that have “ants-in-the-pants” syndrome.

            Any dog is great as a therapy dog if they’re trained properly. And yes, I have a background in psychology.

          • Kellie

            KJ, yes he has been diagnosed he is not the only one in our family his dad, and uncle, grandfather all have ADHD, they do not have lack of discipline, and trust me we are very knowledgeable about ADHD, have done a lot of research due to the family history, I never said my grandson was on medication, as he is not my daughter like myself have found several ways to deal with it, and the Doctors have helped, not all children with ADHD are on medication, and yes I do know what I am talking about.

          • Eleanor Jacobs

            Until the dog is provoked and then the damage a pit is going to do is going to be greater than most other dogs. Kellie, Pits are wonderful. They just have a style of fighting and biting that is even more dangerous than your average dog. I am glad you have a dog you trust. Doesn’t mean others have to trust him too. I have a Rottie German Shepard mix. Others are fearful around him. I get the reasons too. So I am More Careful than the average dog owner. Its just part of life with some breeds. Extra care is required.

          • stan

            thank you. i saw the “up”, “down” “reply” and “share” buttons but i couldn’t find the “idiot” button for karens post. you saved me the trouble. and yes, i too have a sweet pittie mix.

          • Amy Moonan

            when you speak negatively about someone it says more about you than about them shame on the haters. discussions can be civil. That is the problem in this country no one is nice any more.

          • Karen
          • NJ Pit Mom62

            I agree. It’s not the breed, its the owner. People do need to stop playing into the whole media hype about pit bulls. Statistics shows that more people are bitten by Golden Retrievers. There’s a documentary out there that people should watch called “behind the myth”…and its just that a myth. All my pits are loving, friendly dogs. Gentle around children.

          • Karen

            Yes, and who funded that film? :-)

          • NJ Pit Mom62

            I really don’t care who funded it. If you’re so concern about being confrontational, you can go an research yourself. I have been following down this trail, and you seem to be battling every poster who don’t agree with you. It’s not that serious. Either you like them or you don’t. I played into this hype up to 2 years ago, until I adopted a pitbull as a rescue. The BEST dog I ever had. I have just got my 2nd pitbull and love them to death. Beautiful animals and we’ll continue to own them as NJ is not a BSL state..

          • Karen

            Oh I already know who – Karen Delise. One of the biggest pro pit propagandists in this country. She has a vested interest in promoting them.

          • TattooedLittleMiss

            Thank you.

          • Eleanor Jacobs

            because more people own Golden Retrievers than pit bulls. come on, lets not use that tired non-statistic.

          • Skip Sisson

            I don’t believe you have all those pages to post. Your are hiding behind ” it’s a waste of time” If we are wrong back it up so we can see our error.

          • JewelChick

            Skip, I just have to ask . . . are you the other person on the planet who loves “Up the Academy”??

          • Paula

            The amount of ignorance toward pits is amazing to me. I’ts not the breed,its the breeder,and or the person raising the dog.I worked in animal er for 13 years,and the little dogs did the most harm. It’s just like raising a child,if they grow up in a household with no direction and no consequences for their actions then you have a kid that’s out of control. Animals are only as good as the person raising them.Thats why are jails are bursting at the seams with felons. Our shelters are bursting at the seams not because the dog or cat is “bad” it’s because ignorant people think animals are disposable. Some people should not be allowed to have animals and definitely not have kids! Get educated people,and stop blaming pits. I have one,and it’s the best dog that I have ever had!! I rescued him!

          • laurenwhit279

            Thank you! We live next door to a pitbull who was used for fighting.
            He’s chained up all the time, so when we moved in two years ago I was
            worried about him because we have a yorkie. She’s afraid of bigger dogs
            anyway and stays away from him. But one day he got under the fence while
            I was gone and was just sitting in my yard when I got home. I went over
            to meet him and found out he’s a total sweetheart. My in-laws had a
            rottie when my husband was little and they grew up together. She was
            protective but was the sweetest dog you’d ever know once she knew you
            were a friend or family. My parents had a doberman when my brother was
            younger. They had to get rid of her when they moved, but she was also a
            very sweet dog and they never had any problems with her.

          • sweetone100percent

            Karen is nothing more than a know it nothing. I’d say know it all, but she doesn’t qualify for that. Her statements echo abusive techniques that have long-since been abandoned for years. Her lack of knowledge concerning pits and service dogs is so evident, that her posts make no logical sense, whatsoever. She posts links that are so backwards, that anyone with a half a brain can see through the charade she poses. She’s nothing but a troll! Many years ago, other countries did the BSL ban with various dogs, ranging from rotts, and even poodles. The bite capacity was no different from one breed to the next, and anyone believing in them soon found that they couldn’t even identify one from another. The bites didn’t decrease over the years, and eventually, the BSL was eliminated in many of those countries. Anyone that knew anything about BSL would know that. Karen has claimed all sorts of knowledge concerning the various breeds, yet her comments show complete ignorance, based on what is written by the media and fact-less sites on the web that any person can search through. Yet, when you actually deal with the rescue community, anyone with ANY KNOWLEDGE concerning these breeds, KNOWS BETTER than to say anything about ANY PARTICULAR BREED. .Speak to ANY VET and they will CLEARLY SHOW that the amounts of these breeds are MASSIVE, and because of such, the NUMBERS and the MEDICAL information is FALSIFIED by the media…and ANYONE IN THE FIELD WILL TELL YOU THAT!!

            http://www.stevedalepetworld.com/print-archive/vintage-stories/animal-stories/43-dog-attacks-exaggerated-particularly-when-it-comes-to-pit-bulls

            “Because of the vagueness of the “pit bull” label, many people may have
            trouble recognizing a pit bull when they see one. Multiple breeds are
            commonly mistaken for pit bulls, including the Boxer, the Presa Canario,
            the Cane Corso, the Dogo Argentino, the Tosa Inu, the Bullmastiff, the
            Dogue de Bordeaux, the Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog and the Olde English
            Bulldogge. Think you can accurately identify a pit bull? Test yourself
            by following this link: http://www.understand-a-bull.com/Findthebull/findpitbull_v3.html

            Source: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/truth-about-pit-bulls. .

            “Despite the fact that pit bulls were bred to fight with each other,
            early breeders took pride in producing dogs that were trustworthy and friendly to people. Handlers bathed their opponent’s dog before a match, stood in the pits with the battling dogs and often pulled them apart to end a fight. Any dog who behaved aggressively toward a person was culled, or killed, to avoid passing on such an undesirable trait. Pit bulls typically lived in their owner’s homes, where they earned the nickname “nursemaid’s dog” because they were so reliable with young
            children. In fact, “Pete the Pup,” the children’s friend from the old TV series “Our Gang,” was a pit bull.”

            ” A pit bull bite is far more likely to draw media attention.
            Many dogs of other breeds bite people, but these incidents almost always go unreported. They’re just not exciting enough fodder for television and print.Despite this bad rap, a well-bred, well-socialized and well-trained pit bull is one of the most delightful, intelligent and
            gentle dogs imaginable. It is truly a shame that the media continues to portray such a warped image of this beautiful, loyal and affectionate breed. Pit bulls once enjoyed a wonderful reputation. Some of the most famous dogs in American history were pit bulls.”

            “The American Pit Bull Terrier is perhaps the most infamous animal on the planet. Banned in many countries and highly regulated in others, rumors persist that this dog is a relentless killer. The pit bull’s most fearsome weapon is its bite; many sources assert that this dog’s jaw can actually lock in place, but in fact, the structure of a pit bull’s jaw is no different than any other dog.”

            Source: http://knowledgenuts.com/2013/09/13/pit-bulls-do-not-have-locking-jaws/

            320 lbs for a rottie which beat out a pit, HANDS DOWN in a competition: See it for yourself: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADDxe24ud90 So, please Karen, you know NOTHING about a pit and what they do, and how a vet or real trainer sees one.

            Locking Jaw? BULL! http://www.dogwatch.net/myths/lock_jaw.html. Not according to the vets: Dr. Lehr Brisbin of the University of Georgia wrote:
            “The few studies which have been conducted of the structure of the skulls, mandibles and teeth of pit bulls show that, in proportion to their size, their jaw structure and thus its inferred functional morphology, is no different than that of any breed of dog. There is absolutely no evidence for the existence of any kind of “locking mechanism” unique to the structure of the jaw and/or teeth of the American Pit Bull Terrier.”

            The ‘pit bull’ has powerful jaws, but they are not alone in this.
            This is yet another myth – that ‘pit bulls’ are more dangerous because they have the most powerful bite. Most large breeds and cross breeds have a very strong bite, and even smaller dogs can inflict a bite powerful enough to kill. Any dogs can be dangerous in the hands or an irresponsible,negligent or abusive owner.

            So, Karen, PLEASE do not spread your MISINFORMATION any further.

          • Ann Nonomiss

            good for you, karen! i’ve had dobies, shepherds, rotties & now a pit. they have all been seriously fabulous dogs.

          • Tucker Tiede

            Okay, So I’m not a fan of pits, but I have to agree that the breed its self is not the problem. It’s the people who breed and handle each animal. I’ve had a pit come through a plate glass window after my shepherd mix that I was walking on the street and attack. Thankfully my pup came out with minimal damage. I’ve also seen a Lab bite the side of the face of a child doing severe damage. I myself have scars around my face from a sheltie that decided that I had gotten to close to its food. What it comes down to is we have to understand each breed was bred for certain characteristics. We have to be aware of them and understand how those characteristics effect the behavior of each individual. So many variables come to play when it comes to our beloved dogs. In each breed we are going to have the “bad” apples and “good” apples. We have them in all species of mammals and that includes the species Homo sapiens.

          • Dagummit

            You don’t have to be a fan of pit bulls to not think they are a bad breed. You’re probably not a fan of pit bulls like I am not a fan of Miniature Schnauzers, Miniature Pinschers, Labradors, etc. It’s not that I hate the breed. It’s just that they aren’t my cup of tea :)

          • Eleanor Jacobs

            calling people idiots just makes you look bad “Guest”.

          • Cali Holtzinger

            Not all pits are aggressive. More pits are loyal and loving for life than those that aren’t for each one that attacks someone over a million have not. Of course you hear more about them than the countless other dogs that bite and you wont see articles about the extremely high passing rate of the pitbull on temperament testing over other types of dogs. Or that Pitbulls with their supposed “locking jaws” that have less bite power than a german sheppard. Or the fact that most pitbulls that are identified as such from the media are in fact mixed dogs with a muscular build and not in fact a true purebred pit. Too many people like you read into the hype then jump on the bandwagon of bashing a breed of dog that you wear blinders to all other dogs that attack. All breeds of dogs can bite, and all breeds of dogs can and do attack. To single out one breed based on the way they look is narrow minded and shows how uneducated a person is on a topic they have no business discussing.

          • Karen
          • Kelly

            Pits, by nature, are loving, friendly and have a HIGH drive to please! So if they have a owner using them as a ‘blood sport dog’ (as you put it) they will do well, just as if they have an owner looking to jog, train, fetch the ball or play with their kids – they will also do well! They are a breed that aims to please their own and won’t stop until they do! I have a rescue pit mix that I knew nothing about, along with many other rescues and she is the one I trust the MOST with my kids! They can do anything to her and she doesn’t respond at all!! And, I have quite the mix …from puggle to shepherd – all rescues – all with issues and all with me the longest! And, the pit mix is the most trusted!! So Karen, instead of searching for the negative, I suggest you start looking at every rescue as a case by case situation and stop being so judgemental and narrow-minded!

          • Kelly

            And, just for the record German Shepherds are my breed of choice and I have 20+ years exp with the breed. Any breed can dangerous – but it is due to the lack of knowledge of the person handling them!

          • Cali Holtzinger

            Wow, what a completely factless article. Anything to beat down a breed people refuse to understand. Yes, I am an owner of pitbulls, 3 to be exact, yes I have children, also 3. I have owned multiple pitbulls for 8 years. Not ONCE have I had a negative thing happen with a pitbull. However, we had an American Bulldog, bit my middle son and trapped my other in bed growling, our little mixed dog, bit anything that got closed to him. I am by no means saying pitbulls never bite. But how can ANYONE with ANY sense say that they attack more than any other breed of dog? OHHH that’s right, because any dog that has short fur and a muscular build is considered a pitbull in the media. So we all have to jump on a bandwagon and hate a breed that has proven to be more resilient and forgiving than just about any other breed. Look at the dogs recued from Michael Vick, look at the dogs on The Dog Whisperer with Cesar Milan, Pitbulls and Parolees… Come on, you cant possibly be that blind to the many good things about this breed. I don’t expect everyone to love pits, I just wish the sheeple of the world would stop following mainstream misinformed media and take the time to pet a pitbull and see that most, the vast majority, have nothing but love in their hearts and the only killing they want to do is smother you with kisses. While I am in no way convinced I will changed anyones mind over the internet, I know what I am doing in the real world will. Take the time to glance at my pictures of my children with 2 of our show dogs. Believe it or not, there are shows being held in neighborhoods all across the country that are full of NOTHING but pitbulls and children and adults all getting along without incident. Maybe you should take the time to check one out. Check out http://theabkcdogs.org/events and look at all the shows. You might just be surprised at how these dogs really are when the media isn’t casting a negative spotlight on them.

          • Crysania

            Karen is likely one of a handful of people who come to every dog article and post the same stuff. I see these same links posted all over the place by a handful of people. There’s a group of anti-pit nutters started by the lady who did the “dogsbite.org” site (which is so full of untruths and twisted facts that it’s absurd).

          • NJ Pit Mom62

            Your 4 children are adorable. It was Daddy from the Dog Whisperer who changed my mind about Pitbulls. I love them, their character, their gentleness, and their protectiveness towards their family. They may not be mean but they’ll stand by your side when it’s needed. Be blessed!

          • Nudge

            There is so much density in that post I dont know what to think.

          • Stacey Sheeketski

            Anyone who uses dogsbite.org as a resource is no one to be listened to. Anyway, I’m not seeing how this list of Google searches and blog entries has anything to do with the yellow ribbon.

          • nik Arnoldi

            If you replaced the name of the breed with any other breed (aside from possibly, golden retriever), nobody would be surprised in any of these files about pit bulls. It’s not the breed. If we did that with people, that would be considered racist.

          • Nudge

            My friend says “Your post is so dense the military should use it as missile protection.” I agree.

            Oh, and chihuahuas are more commonly agressive. Most people dont report bites from chihuahuas because they do no real damage. Can you imagine a guy in the ER? “Please… I’m bleeding… That bloody tiny mexican dog bit me! Puncture wounds everywher!” People typically hold them and baby them, and its so cute! Look at him flailing around! Eh, barking is getting annoying, just put him away.

            They are easier to control because they are smaller than cats.

          • Karen

            It’s dense because you don’t like what I posted? I didn’t post opinions, I posted new articles and papers. Sorry you don’t like the message but it doesn’t change the facts of the links.

          • Nudge

            Those links are just as biased as you are. I can post about that bombing in russia as “proof” that whatever race did it is agressive but it simply isnt true. I can post links about a tribe in africa that lives in horrific conditions and say “Africa is poor” and thats not necessarily tre either because some parts of africa are very upper class.

            And if you want proof:

            Pit saves kitten from coyote: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/14/pit-bull-saves-cat_n_4090996.html

            Saves owner from attacker
            http://www.lifewithdogs.tv/2013/11/pit-bull-sacrifices-self-to-save-owner-from-attacker/

            saves family from house fire
            http://wtvr.com/2013/12/08/1-injured-in-hanover-house-fire/

            Saves woman and child from attacker (was a stray, didnt know them)
            http://www.examiner.com/article/stray-pit-bull-saves-a-woman-and-child-from-attacker

            http://myfox8.com/2013/11/17/pit-bull-saves-woman-from-machete-attack-police-say/

            Saves a 9y/o boy from being abducted
            http://www.denverpost.com/search/ci_4095627

            Saves woman from potential Rapist
            http://www.examiner.com/article/pit-bull-saves-owner-from-potential-rapist

            Prevented an armed robber from sstealing 3m/o baby
            http://www.dogheirs.com/tamara/posts/2319-protective-pit-bull-stops-armed-intruders-from-stealing-baby-from-home

            Newly rescued, saves boy from illness
            http://www.ksl.com/?sid=27211423

            So do I need more proof? Where was your media when these thigns happened?

          • Karen

            These are all things normal dogs do all the time. That’s like when a man does the dishes or changes a diaper, he expects a medal. The pit took an opportunity to fight another animal – big surprise. The fire “hero”? Something any animal would have done, including cats and birds. There was nothing heroic about that. And one thing these pit bull “hero” stories all seem to have in common is lack of a witness. I can say I passed out on the floor and my little dog licked me away and call the press, he’s a HERO! One thing all the pit mauling stories seem to have in common is they DO have witnesses. I do understand though with pit bulls making the news DAILY for their viciousness, the need to try and make them look better. But alas, in a few more days, we’ll be reading of another dog killing someone and it won’t be a Lab, or a German Shepherd, or a Beagle, or one of the other top 10 most popular breeds. We all know what dog will be involved. Then we’ll wait a few more days and we’ll see it again. In between those stories will be a few more stories of someone getting an arm torn off, or their pet pony or therapy donkey mauled, or someone’s barn full of horse. You can talk and talk about how great they are, but the headlines will keep coming. And that’s what people will “hear”.

          • Nudge

            yea, people will hear the biased untruths.

            Like I already said, ALL of media JUMPS at the mention of Pit bull and Attack.

            You know what? Im done with you. I’m not givinng up. I will not tell, but SHOW every person I meet the love of pits. But I’m not arguing with someone as narrowminded and nearsighted as you.

            Oh, and by the way…

            http://www.dogguide.net/blog/2008/07/the-3-most-aggressive-dog-breeds-revealed-pit-bulls-rottweilers-youll-be-surprised/

            Chihuahuas, Daschunds, and Jack Russel Terriers.
            They show the most agression towards other people and dogs.

          • Karen

            And you can bet when Chihuahuas, Dachshunds, and Jack Russel Terriers are tearing off limbs, ripping off faces, scalping, tearing out eyeballs, crushing spines, crushing skulls, breaking bones, and eviscerating victims, you can bet IT WILL MAKE THE NEWS! When those dogs start killing someone approximately every 14 days, they WILL BE IN THE NEWS. There is not a rash of Poodle maulings being swept under the rug by the media. There are also COUNTLESS pit bull bites and attacks that are NOT reported by the media. Just like the news reports a multi-vehicle pile-up or a deadly crash, but not every fender-bender, they only report the serious attacks. Unfortunately, that typically involves pit bulls. No one is particularly interested when a dog gives someone a puncture wound and/or bruising but when a dog tears off both arms, both ears, an eye, and the scalp, yeah, it’s gonna make the news!

          • Little

            Awww you don’t like stories that don’t match your pit hating personality.

          • Kelly

            You can share stories like these with many breeds! Not just pits…it’s just that they are currently what’s on the radar screen! And, Pits have many good stories to share – why didn’t you post any of those?? I know of quite a few…

          • Claire

            Hey guys. I am a pit owner and definitely believe that they are not more inherently vicious or mean than other breeds–I definitely disagreed with Karen. However I don’t think that name calling is the best way to convince her (or anyone) that pits can be rock star pets. Instead of using words to prove to people that pits are awesome, I try to show people–I show off her obedience training, post pictures of us cuddling, take her out so the little-kid neighbors can pet her, etc. I totally understand everyone’s frustration–we love our pits!–but in my experience the best way to convince others that pits are great is by showing how awesome mine is. I’m not sure that arguing and name-calling are the best way to convince others!

          • Karen

            That would be terrific except the dogs listed above *were* “rock star pets” and at least two of them had obedience training. They are super, until they aren’t. And there is not way of predicting if, when, and under what circumstances their genetic drive will kick in. There is nothing in that post to disagree with me on – those are factual stories. Those attacks *did* happen. Those stats are real. It’s not an opinion.

          • Laryssa

            Honestly, statistics have proven that you are more likely to be killed from a random coconut dropping on your head at a beach than the chances of receiving a life threatening or serious medical emergency from a pitbull.
            Ma’am, you frankly offend me with your biased bs.

          • Karen

            It took a little longer for the coconut analogy to come up! I think most of the others have been covered. When is the last time anyone has heard of someone being killed by a random coconut? Seriously?

          • Raven Nicolette

            You’re an idiot. My Cocker Spaniel is WAY more aggressive than my Pit. My Pit barely even growls at people–it’s another story when she alerts us to a knock at the door. My Cocker Spaniel, on the other hand, is vicious, and we have to lock him up when people come over, so no one gets bitten. My Pit? She just lays around and wags her tail, and waits for you to pet her.

          • TattooedLittleMiss

            Cockers are prone to rage syndrome (pit bulls, actually, are not). It’s hard finding a vet capable of diagnosing, but you might look into it. Though last I checked it was untreatable, so it might not even be worth the money, since you obviously are aware of your dog’s temperament.

          • TattooedLittleMiss

            And yet, if you look at registered attacks, there are no more pibull attacks than there are retriever attacks. Difference? Goldens are a popular breed and don’t make for the same views that “vicious” pits do.

          • Georgie Pancake Isle-pheasey

            ugh its the ownwer not the breed educate yourself! have you ever had a pit or a staff? becouse you dont know anything untill you do. the papers focus on the negative when most dogs when brought up correctly are fine.

          • Sasha

            Regardless of your ‘facts’ putting all the blame on the pit bull isn’t going to actually help. BSL doesn’t work! It costs tons of money, cops get calls about ‘pit bulls’ running around and they have to go investigate, usually not finding the dog or it turning out to be some other breed. Also the cops aren’t all trained in determining a breed of dog. Also blaming all bites (or even a majority) of attacks on pit bulls creates this false sense of security. If pit bulls are the only dangerous dog then why train the lab or retriever not to bite? Also if you look at cities where BSL has been in effect for years (or even countries) their number of bites have not gone down. Also if we did manage to kill all the pit bulls in the world, why wouldn’t dog fighters would turn to another breed of dog?
            Take a look at this –

            http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/abs/10.2460/javma.243.12.1726

            Instead of trying to use the pit bull as a scapegoat why not have laws for spay and neuter? Teach children in school how to appropriately approach a dog? Make stronger leash laws for all breeds? Teach new parents to not let their children alone with the dog?

          • Karen

            BSL *does* work, and very well! When people say it doesn’t, they say “there were just as many dog bites”, or there were more “dog bites”. But the number of pit bull maulings goes down. It works.

          • Crysania

            So basically you don’t care about people being attacked by other dogs? It seems you lack logic. Let’s say in my city there were 10 fatalities in a year from dog bites. 7 were attributed to pit bulls. So a ban is enacted, pit bulls are killed or taken from the city. No no one owns them anymore. This means that there should only be around 3 fatalities the following year. But lo and behold, there was again 10! Do you then say “Well, at least they weren’t killed by those awful pit bulls!” or do you realize that, perhaps, the irresponsible people who had pit bulls went out and got a different breed, neglected and abused THOSE dogs and that neglect/abuse led to the same sort of behavior seen in the pit bulls they had before. I can chain up a pit bull and forget to feed it and create a frustrated unsocialized dog who will attack anyone who gets too close. I could do the same thing to a Rottweiler, a GSD, a Golden Retriever, or a Husky. Does the breed that kills MATTER? Or perhaps should people be looking at education, at getting dogs away from those who neglect/abuse, at getting them off chains, etc.? It seems to me that, like the rest of your anti-pit bull crew, you ONLY care about victims who were attacked by pit bulls. Get attacked by a Lab and it just doesn’t matter to you. That’s rather disconcerting.

          • Sasha

            Okay so there are less pit bull bites and more bites from other dogs. The point is if you are looking at it from a public safety view point BSL does not make the public safer. It actually does the exact opposite because it spends all that money on a pit bull ban that could be used on something that is proven to improve public safety.

          • Amber

            Karen, everything you posted are anecdotal stories. Do you have scientific evidence that pitbulls are predisposed to be nothing but dangerous? I’m sure I can find multiple stories about poodles, or labs, or any other dog that have attacked people. It’s NOT the breed, it’s the owners.

          • Karen

            You an find links to the various scientific articles I’ve posted under other comments. Every single day there is a new “anecdotal” story and they don’t involve poodles, labs, or any other dog – it *is* the breed. There is a reason why “the breed” is responsible for almost all of the (what did it end up, 30 or so?) dog-related fatalities this year. These mutants are a menace to society and the breed needs to be legislated into elimination. Pit fighting and bull baiting are illegal. There is absolutely NOTHING these dogs offer that can’t be found in dozens of other breeds, and without the inherent danger.

          • Sondra

            what about the Pomeranian that mauled a baby..?
            http://articles.latimes.com/2000/oct/09/local/me-34015

            Oh oops…sorry to burst your bubble, but ANY dog can be dangerous…

          • Karen
          • grubes

            Karen, do you have any USEFUL, reliable citations or are you just going to keep posting incomplete stories that cater to your argument? I have 2 pitbulls, ages 8 and 9, and a doberman, age 6, that have grown up with my 2 daughters who are 4 and 6 years old. Not one nip, bite, growl, or bark.
            It’s comical that you want to be an advocate for proper dog training and care but want to completely shun an entire breed based off some incomplete, nonobjective, and poorly written local news articles from some town halfway across the country from where you live. That’s like being a civil rights activist in the 60′s but you only want equal rights for everybody except the hispanics, because you heard they are violent even though you have never personally seen it.

          • Karen

            The *victims* didn’t write a convincing enough story for you? Their pits had not one single nip, bite, growl, or bark either. They grew up with children as well. They would have (and DID) swear *their* pit would never hurt a fly. They were wrong. Just like their family pits could snap and maul or kill a child with no warning signs, so could yours. I know that’s a jagged little pill to swallow but your pit is no better than theirs. It’s not loved any more. It’s not treated any kinder.

          • Mandi Samara

            After reading your comments up until now, as well as everyone else’s, I’ve decided I simply will never own a dog. Ever. I was bit twice as a child. Once by a border collie who was chained up – I didn’t know any better, and tried to kiss the dog on the nose. She jumped up and bit my face. I had holes from her teeth all around my mouth. I’m not sure of the other dog’s breed that bit me. It was a medium sized, darker colored dog.. pure bred something rather. A friend of my mom’s found out I was an animal lover, and wanted me to see her two dogs she was very proud of. I could tell she loved them very much. She brought them out of her house, and the one ran up to me and bit my knee. It would NOT let go. It completely shredded my knee cap, but I still cried when they put the animal down. I felt like I was at fault.

            I thought you were a little crazy for hating one breed so badly, but I also think some of these commenters are pretty crazy for blaming the families of dogs that have bitten, maimed, or killed too. Honestly, in my opinion, an animal is an animal. I don’t care how domesticated or well bred and trained it is. Animals are instinctive, and can lash out at any time. I just refuse to trust something that is capable of seriously harming me for no actual reason. Little dogs freak me out too. As they get older they seem to get mean.

          • Dagummit

            No doubt about it, dogs deserve our respect. They do have a big mouth full of teeth and people often forget that we live in harmony with carnivores that tolerate so much from us.

            However, the fact remains that some of the families and victims ARE at fault. Are they ALL at fault? No way. But the truth that hides in these stories will often explain why a dog bit someone. As a kid, I was bitten my my grandmother’s Cocker Spaniel that she loved almost as much as us grandkids. All I did was reach down and pet the dog and she bit my hand. It would appear that the dog was at fault but the reality was that my grandmother did NOTHING to socialize the dog. They were never taken out in public or exposed to anyone but her and the few people that were around regularly. She was not used to children being in the house for so long (we were staying with her for a week or so) and the stress of having unpredictable children around for so long kept building up. My father was also at fault for not teaching us to give a nervous dog the space it needs to be comfortable. Thankfully, it was not a bad bite and I learned that lesson.

            My stepbrother was bitten in the face by a neighbor’s Old English Sheepdog when we were kids. That dog’s family was to blame because they let that dog run wild and it was never taught even basic manners. The dog ran the household and they all just lived around the dog. Again, my father and stepmom were also at fault for not recognizing that the dog was really too unruly for us to be allowed to be around him. The dog was used to getting his way and, when he didn’t, my stepbrother was bitten.

            My neighbor’s little girl had her hand punctured clean through by a dog belonging to some of their friends while they were at the river about 5 years back. The little girl, who was just a toddler at the time, walked up to the dog while the dog was chewing on a bone it had been tossed. She reached down to hand the dog a toy and the dog bit her hand. The owner was to blame because he wasn’t keeping an eye on his dog (it was loose) while it was eating and never got this dog’s resource guarding under control. Her parents were to blame because they just let her wander up to this dog they hardly knew and just plain weren’t watching her.

            In all three of these cases, these bites happened because the dog was never taught any different. People forget that dogs really aren’t meant to live the way they do. We keep them in neighborhoods and in apartments in huge cities. No animal, regardless of breeding, was ever meant for this. But we do and they adapt. We HAVE to teach them the rules. How can they know what is right and wrong in the human world if we don’t teach them?

            In all three of these situations, my dogs would be fine. My dogs are used to having people staying with us or coming and going and, because they are used to it, they don’t get nervous when we have friends stay with us. We exposed them to people of all colors, sizes, heights, nationalities, ages, and any other variation you can have in human beings. As a result, they are not nervous around certain variables. My dogs are given rules to abide by and they were taught how to behave in the house and out of it. WE make the rules, not them. My dogs, while I don’t ever encourage anyone to do it as it’s just rude, will willingly step back and let you take their food or their toy or their treat because they were taught that resource guarding is unacceptable. You and your family would have nothing to fear around my dogs because I made sure they know what to expect and know how they are expected to behave. If you did the same thing, you too could have a dog that you felt comfortable around.

            If you even read to this point, I don’t want you to think that I am trying to belittle you for not wanting a dog or push you to get one. It is absolutely up to each individual to decide if they want a dog or not. I just hope you are able to someday let go of that fear and share your life with what is one of the most amazing animal companions to share your life with.

          • KATY

            KAREN YOUR UNEDUCATED. ALL ANIMALS CAN BE BAD ANIMALS. JUST AS ALL PEOPLE CAN BE BAD PEOPLE. THE WAY YOU TREAT, SOCIALIZE, RAISE AND TRAIN YOUR DOG CAN ALL EFFECT IT’S BEHAVIOR AND GENETIC TRAITS LIKE HEARDING AND PROTECTING CAN PLAY FACTORS. THEN THERE ARE JUST SOME DOGS WHO JUST DON’T LIKE KIDS, OR OTHER DOGS JUST AS THERE ARE PEOPLE WHO JUST DON’T LIKE KIDS OR DOGS TOO. EVERY AND I MEAN EVERY BREED IS A GOOD DOG WHEN AROUND EDUCATED PEOPLE. OWNING SOME BREEDS I THINK YOU SHOULD HAVE TO TAKE A PERSONALITY TEST BEFORE OWNING.AS A HIGH STRUNG INDIVIDUAL WOULD NOT LIKELY BE A GOOD MATCH FOR TERRIERS AND HUNTING BREEDS. THEIR ENERGY COMBINED WITH THE INTENSE ENERGY OF A TERRIER WOULD SURELY LEED TO MISCOMUNICATION AND DIFFERENT WANTS AND NEEDS BETWEEN THE OWNER AND DOG CAUSING TENSION. TENSION MAY LEAD TO BAD BEHAVIORS AND EVEN AGRESSION. ANYWAY GET EDUCATED PLEASE. HAVE YOUR OPINION BUT ONLY SPEAK FACTS.

          • Crysania

            Oh get lost. This is a story about ALL dogs who need space. Take your nonsense elsewhere. No one is interested in this crap.

          • Mildred Milly Lawrence-Newson

            Karen is entitled to her opinion. My cousin owns a pit and she is very gentle around the kids. Would I take a chance and get one? No. That doesn’t make me a bad person. It just makes me a cautious person.

          • disqus_RFLEOrrjJn

            Loud and clear: You are a hateful CUNT.

          • Jessica Pancakes Patton

            Pitbulls are strong dogs, sick (as in bad) people would tak advantage of that and train them to be vicious. I have seen good dogs with good owners, i’ve seen bad dogs with bad owners, i have never seen a bad dogs with good owners, but all dogs are diffrent, MOST can be changed, SOME will stay skiddish or mean forever. It’s mostly how the owner raises the dog.

          • KJ

            What we should be worried about is the incorrect information out there that gets continuously regurgitated as true. You yap about Pitbulls, but did you know that the #1 dog to bite is the Golden Retriever? Bet you didn’t.

            I can show you all sorts of personal stories about specific breeds. It’s all about what you look for.

          • Jessica Pancakes Patton

            Hope you have fun killing INNOCENT dogs! I have never seen an aggresive PITBULL, but go ahead, KILL INNOCENT PITBULLS! HAVE FUN IN PRISON, I HOPE.

          • cypres

            Karen, I have three Labrador Retrievers. They are goofy, sweet, loyal, and harmless. Every time I see them, I fall more in love. But in a survey of people treated in American ERs for dog bites, the number one offender was the Labrador Retriever. So don’t think for one second that anyone with half a brain is going to buy into your pit-hating propaganda.

          • Little

            Every breed of dog has fatality statistics. And if you’re trusting sites that exist solely to make any specific thing look bad, you’re not looking somewhere reliable.

          • Robert

            I’m sorry for your ignorance and lack of true understanding of the subject. You are obviously a statistical genius. I could show you stats that prove your ignorance. Look up how many deaths there are per year by dogs, then look up how many were from pitbulls. Then compare that to lightning, shark, tornado, airplane, and choking deaths and you will see that the attacks do happen and are unfortunate but they are an anomaly not worth persecuting Pit Bulls for. If you want to persecute someone, go after the irresponsible owners or the kid that taunted the dog every day before it attacked which is a common scenario in dog attacks. Or maybe go after the government for their lack of educating people like you on the real reasons behind your demonized view. Honestly more children are killed by their parent backing over them than by pit bull attacks. We are the problem, not the dogs. It is an atrocity and crime against Mother Nature & humanity to persecute any animal for their actions.

          • Michael

            There you go. Karen is the problem.

          • Michael

            When I was a kid the bull terriers were the classic family dog in the UK – it was Dobermans and Rotties that the likes of the Daily Fail were telling us were out to eat our children.
            The behaviour of ANY dog is based entirely on the owner of the dog.
            It’s that simple.

          • Patte Laury

            Attacks by German Shepherds: http://articles.latimes.com/2013/oct/02/local/la-me-ln-german-shepherds-attack-pedestrians-in-la-20131002 http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/german-shepherd-savages-girls-face-1936977 http://fox2now.com/2013/01/10/new-athens-girl-attacked-by-2-german-sheppards/ http://www.khou.com/news/Friendswood-police-Girl-attacked-by-German-shepherd-charges-pending-against-dog-owner-144932825.html

            “While at least 4.5 – 4.7 million Americans (2%) are bitten by dogs every
            year, only about 0.0002% of these (less than 0.00001% of the U.S.
            population) result in death, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
            (CDC), who published one of the scholarly papers published on the
            subject that are summarized in the first part of this article.[1]” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatal_dog_attacks_in_the_United_States
            The article continues with: ”

            The study found that powerful molossers were responsible for most attacks; Pit bulls and Rottweilers alone were the majority, but there were also several Bullmastiffs, Boxers, Bull Terriers, Great Danes, St. Bernards, a Rhodesian Ridgeback, a bulldog, and a Newfoundland.

            Working dogs, however, were also frequently implicated, mostly German Shepherds and Doberman Pinschers, but there were also several herders, including Australian shepherds and Collies, and one identified only as a “sheepdog”.

            Spitz and Primitive dogs comprised a substantial minority, including multiple Chow Chows; native Japanese dogs (mostly Akita Inus); and sled dogs types: Huskies, Malamutes and others. One incident involved a Basenji.

            Wolf–dog hybrids killed 14 people during the study period, and dogs identified only as “mixed breeds” or “unknown” killed 15.

            Fatal attacks by retrievers rarely but somewhat regularly occurred, including several Labrador Retrievers and a Chesapeake Bay Retriever.

            There were also a comparatively small number of fatal hound attacks (including a Coonhound and two Dachshunds) and terrier attacks (including two of the smallest ratters: a West Highland White Terrier and a Yorkshire Terrier, which is among the smallest of all dogs). The study also mentioned one fatal attack by a cocker spaniel.[3]”

            The point of this is, it’s not just pit bulls that are capable of behaving badly. Years ago, back in the 70s when I first entered the animal care industry, the big fear was Shepherds. Then in the 80s it was Dobermans. The 90s everyone freaked out if you had a Rottie. Now, it’s pitbulls.

            IMHO anytime a dog gains any sort of popularity, it becomes a victim of over breeding and not only does that hurt the breed, it creates an over abundance of animals that need homes. BYB’s (back yard breeders) think they can make a few bucks, and before you know it you’ve got a breed explosion on your hands.

            Breed traits vary. And I would rather enter a kennel with an unknown pit bull than an unknown cocker spaniel. I’ve been working in this industry since 1974 and I’ve bitten by more spaniels and poodles than anything else.

            But I digress. Regardless of your opinion, the point of this article is to prevent a bad situation from happening. I think this yellow ribbon idea is wonderful!

            Former assistant manager for the Monterey Co SPCA, licensed veterinary surgical technician – retired.

          • Eleanor Jacobs

            I know Karen, I was just trying to see if I could get reasonable conversation going with the other gal, she started out ok and then had all her qualifiers. so i just won’t go there with her.

            there is a guy at my dog park with a pit and i always leave when he arrives because he’s always asking people what they did to “provoke” his pit or what their dog did to provoke his pit. if you have a Pit, you have a different set of rules than other dog owners. its just a fact.

          • Angela Chaisson

            Such valid sources – you must not have any friends in the UK or you’d know that the Daily Mail is comparable to the National Enquirer in the US. Really, you are so misinformed it’s amusing :)

          • Karen

            http://www.catholic.org/hf/family/story.php?id=49359
            I’m sure with a little effort, you can find it plenty of other places as well. She also has a Facebook page. What is it you are disputing? You think the picture is photoshopped and she didn’t really lose her foot? You think she lost her foot in some other way than to her pet pit bull? Do you think the Daily Mail just made the whole thing up and there is no Milly-Ann? Do you think it wasn’t a pit bull but really a Lab (the picture of her dog is on her FB page)? What is it that you think is so sketchy about the story? Denial – ain’t just a river in Egypt!

            https://www.google.co.uk/#q=Milly-Anne+Hemley

          • Stephanie

            I am 1000 more times more terrified of a small dog then I am of a large breed.

          • VirtualBondGirl

            It’s always great for people to ask the question than assume the answer. There is no scientific proof re: the “snapping” or the “locking” of bully breed dogs. They are more tenacious of a breed and far more “game” than others (meaning they ignore pain more readily). That is a trait of the breeds as they were originally bred as bull baiting, bear baiting, and hunting dogs. They were not, however, bred as fighting dogs – that’s the human factor for you. They have historically been great family dogs and have been used as nanny dogs in many societies. In fact, our dogs used to herd my little brother when he was in diapers, and keep him within a certain play area – my mom never once worried the dog would hurt him and always knew where my brother was.

            My rhodesian/pitt mix is quite the hunter and once focused it is hard to break that concentration; while I don’t fear my dog in the midst of his prey drive (he likes to chase squirrels in the our yard)m he is trained to keep his chewy toy in his mouth, which helps manage that instinct. He knows that when I tell him enough, the hunt is over. And he’s fully aware that his toys are mine – I am not afraid to take his toys from him whether they’re laying on the floor in front of him or he’s holding it in his mouth.

            That said, I know he is not always dog friendly (he wasn’t properly socialized as a puppy due to medical reasons, but loves people) and respect the fact he could do some damage and act accordingly. I don’t take him to brunch, the dog park, or highly dog populated hiking trails. I know how to use his pinch collar and how to avoid other people with their dogs so as not to cause an incident. If he decides to growl, bark, or lunge, I know how to reprimand him immediately. I’ve educated myself because I love my dog. He is a sweet boy, but like people, he has his flaws.

            It’s a matter of researching the breed, knowing how to work with the individual dog, and what you can manage. Personally, I’d take a rescue pit mix over any other dog anytime – especially because every time I’ve been bitten, it’s been one of those small fluffy, happy lap dogs that sinks their teeth into me. :p

          • Tony Sorrells

            no dog is more or less dangerous then another physically. all have the potential to do serious damage. the breed makes no difference. ofcourse past abuse can make them more aggressive.

          • Eleanor Jacobs

            Tony think about what you are saying before you write, because I value thoughtful discourse. And “no dog is more or less dangerous than another physically” is just not true. a 3 pound Mini Yorkie is way less dangerous than a 60 lb pitbll. etc. I appreciate your passion for pits and wanting to discredit myths, but be as factual as you can.

          • TattooedLittleMiss

            Pits jaws and method of attack are no different than any other dogs. Common myth. Pits jaws don’t “lock” like many people think. What gives the impression of a pitbull being more dangerous than other dogs is tat they’re built more powerfully and more stoutly than most other breeds. But it’s misconceptions like that that made them popular in the fighting ring, when they’re actually not all that well designed for it, considering they don’t have loose skin that would minimize injury and allow them to get a hold on another dog that’s got them. Not that fighting with ANY dog of ANY breed is acceptable, regardless of the design. Just that misinformation creates dangerous situations.

            That said, I trust dogs pretty implicitly, because dogs are easy. They’re fairly predictable, they have very easy to read body language, and if you’re paying attention, they will tell you exactly what they will tolerate and what they will not. I don’t trust people. I don’t trust them with my own health and safety and I trust them even less with the comfort, safety, and lives of my Shetland sheepdog and my pitbull. People treat dogs like automatons: they don’t bother to learn to read their body language, they don’t listen to the owner when you tell them to back off, they don’t respect that dogs have persona autonomy just like people do. That’s when dogs “snap.” When they feel threatened. And especially pitties, who are hyper-protective to other living things, rather than places and will attack a stranger they feel is threatening their person or a doggy pal. There’s no doubt some owners do a poor job of training their dogs, though I personally have more experience with that in the owners of small dogs and breeding animals than in people with fixed/bigger dogs.

          • Eleanor Jacobs

            sorry you lose credibility when you say dogs i trust its people who are untrustworthy. makes you appear anti-social and sound like you cannot relate normally to people. remember i didn’t say this is true about you, just that it makes you appear that way.

          • TattooedLittleMiss

            I don’t care ho it makes me appear. People are unpredictable and when it comes to animals, they’re downright stupid. So, yeah, when it comes to the health and safety of my pets, I’m anti-social. I don’t let just anyone pet them, I don’t let just any dog play with them, and I never, ever let children near them because those are three very good ways to freak them both out and wind up with a threatened, uncomfortable dog that bites someone.

          • Eleanor Jacobs

            and… she proves my point.

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            How is this a question and why are you asking me? It sounds as if you already have your mind made up about the breed. All I did was call someone out on being a hypocrite, because I believe every dog regardless of breed deserves a chance at rehabilitation. The fact that you have a rottie/shepard mix makes it even more strange that you would even ask/write those things.

          • James Morgan

            Any dog who (not from their poor up bringing but genetics) ‘snaps’ or ‘locks jaw’ is going to be more dangerous. I do not understand why people don’t get the fact that some dogs do not have this instinct (any gun dog- trainind to have a soft bite) and others do (terrier, pit bull, rot…).

          • Amy Wilson

            pits are like any other breed….they don’t just “snap” they become aggressive only through severe training or abuse…..usually the first…i have rescued pits for a long time, and i have learned that most that come from abuse just want to be loved and they will return that love ten fold….there are bad dogs in every breed, just pits do have that jaw, and to understand it and how it works is a big help….i won’t say mine would never, but i will say he is a rescue, was not neutered, and i have had him 10 years and he has never bit anyone….he gets along very well with kids, and any person, he don’t care as long as he can get a rub or a pat on the head :)

          • RitaMc

            That is why some dogs are fighting dogs and others are guard dogs. Some dogs are born retrieving while others are born to pull sleds in the snow. My pit shepherd is extremely protective and territorial. She is fast and runs in circles. She is sweet and loyal like a pit bull, but herds critters and even children, out of bushes like a Shepherd. Can’t deny breeding. P.S. I have had four of my students sent to the hospital by pit bull bites. They are highly favored amongst the local Mexican gangs and they will attack even small children on the pther side of a fence. My own children get whacked just by our dogs tail, she i sso strong. I am constantly on her to be gentle.

          • Scott Therrien

            Im a type of person that does not shed a tear really.. but i took a walk in a shelter and when i saw over 90% of the dogs was pitbulls i did shed a tear that day and this shelter houses over 100+ dogs.. I have 2 pits and I don’t think i will ever meet another bread that is so active and loyal and smart as pitbulls are

          • Amy Wilson

            i totally agree with you…it is sad!!!! Pits are the only breed i will own :) and yes i have had other breeds and yes i still say pitts are the best!!!

          • dmbouchard84

            Pits are one of my favorite breed…however there are several other breeds that are awesome…not a true dog lover to just say one breed is the best..

          • Connie Moorhead

            If over 90% were pitts – what did that tell you?? Pitts were taken to the pound much more frequently than other breeds. Must be a reason??
            You love yours, but obviously other owners don’t!

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            Connie, because you’re 159 years old I will forgive you for the comment. Maybe you should check with your care giver and make sure it’s not past your bedtime!

          • http://libbyspinkvanity.blogspot.com Kimberly

            How sad that you feel OK stooping to bullying another.

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            Bullying? This woman has her mind made up about something and so I have my mind made up about her… if you share your opinion in a comments section expect to get a response

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            :)

          • Jenn Dyno

            That doesn’t justify the ageism. You are attacking every elderly person with an opinion when you stoop to that, and it is just as bad as the stigmatisation against pit bulls.

          • Kathleen Powell

            I don’t feel that she is bullying anyone. The only people that are being “bullied” are these pit bulls. She has a right to defend them seeing as not many people are willing to. To me, Connie seems to be the “bully”. I have two pitts myself. And having owned other breeds, these are by far the most gentle and sweet tempered animals I have ever had the pleasure of meeting.

          • RitaMc

            She was making a personal attack on someone based on something they cannot help instead of addressing her opposing opinion. That is considered bullying. I love my pit bull, but I understand the anxiety people have with bully breeds. No one should make fun of someone for being an elder. Although, it probably OK for calling her out as a 14 yo. Now, that was kind of funny.

          • SmarterThanYou

            Connie didn’t say anything horrible? what she said is true? The owners of those specific pit bulls did not want them anymore? Or abused them or for what ever reason didn’t keep them?

          • Deborah

            Then you blame who is responsible …the PERSON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

          • kaththee

            Oh they don’t want to do THAT. Then they would have to take responsibility for their poor choices.

          • Jenn Dyno

            She has a right to defend the pit bulls definitely. But her comment does so by attacking every elderly person. That is definitely bullying and NOT a good way to get any point across.

          • disqus_z4xdvsMRyL

            And because you are obviously 14 yrs old I will forgive your rude comment. Now go to bed so the grown ups can talk.

          • Andrea Davis Hatch

            Wow, that was ignorant.

          • PrincessLily

            The reason they are being taken to shelters is because virtually ZERO places to rent will allow pit bulls to live there, regardless of their actual temperament. And with more and more people losing their jobs and not being able to afford their own homes – thus all the pits having to go to shelters when their family has to start renting.

          • Susan Harlas

            I believe that is because of over breeding people thinking they can sell them and then they don’t and can’t take care of them so the go to the pound

          • SmarterThanYou

            That is exactly what my local shelter said about pits.

          • Allosauridae

            BSL here in my area. Some local towns you can’t have Pits among others breeds. I don’t agree with it personally. Wish there were other ways, SOME have no choice & try everything they can to keep their beloved pet then others don’t try hard to find other options.

          • SmarterThanYou

            That’s crap? Places say no pets, I have rented several properties and they all say either no pets or pets allowed. Not specific things like that? whats next? Guinea pigs are welcome but no hamsters?

            The reason pits are taken back is because they are a very common bread and people often take them not knowing what they are like, also they have this bad reputation which may be unjust, but still people don’t want them.

            Pits are like any other dog, or like people for that matter you get nice ones and horrible ones? it is the individual and the owners styles that determine this.

          • meikens12

            Actually our local BSL requires pit owners to carry 300k liability insurance and keep them muzzled at all times when they are outside. Since the liability insurance is attached to your homeowners policy, renters cannot legally have a pit. Not saying I agree with it, just explaining what she was saying. Depends on where you live and how the BSL is written. she’s correct

          • Denise

            SmarterThanYou, 1) I have lived in Central Florida all my life. Every apartment I have ever made inquiries about, (I have needed them to allow pets as I have 2 small dogs.) had exclusions of certain breeds and/or weights. When it was just breeds, Pit Bulls and Chow Chows were ALWAYS on the list. I bred Chow Chows years ago and while mine were FABULOUS dogs with great temperaments, I knew very well the strength they had and that other “breeders” had less than delightful Chows. 2) What rock has someone been living under that they would not know the reputation (just or unjust) of the Pit Bull breed? 3) Other than having 4 paws, etc, Pit Bulls are NOT just like any other dog! Through selective breeding, pit bulls have developed enormous jaw strength, as well as a ruinous “hold and shake” bite style, designed to inflict the maximum damage possible on their victims. This bite trait delivered winning results in the fighting pit. When the Colorado Supreme Court upheld the Denver pit bull ban in 2005, the high court set aside characteristics that pit bulls displayed when they attack that differ from all other dog breeds. One of these characteristics was their lethal bite. So, while anyone’s non Pit Bull can certainly bite you, BELIEVE me the Pit Bull should be at the end of your list if you have a choice as to the breed you tangle with…. regardless of the owner’s style…. (Your name is not always correct…)

          • Jennifer

            By that logic, we should not own a single breed of dog. A Pomeranian made the news once for killing an infant. It is well known that any dog has the power to severely injure and kill a person, even if it is just an infant. They’re all capable of being a danger. Why should we mess with any of them?

          • Deborah

            True, but I can think of more humans that should be put down than any dog!

          • Deborah

            If you rent a place of course it should be smaller, because they have no room how dare u call me ignorant, if I have a home it is my right do you judge people as you do animals u ass!

          • kaththee

            Right and the great thing about the pit bull is he could do the job faster with less suffering to the child. Your “logic” is called a false equivalency and reductionism. You can die falling out of bed and live climbing Mount Everest but one is much more dangerous than the other. Pitbulls have killed 128 Americans (over half children) and one Pomeranian killed an American baby. Don’t pretend that is the same. It is just stupid. I don’t hate pit bulls just because I recognize that they are more dangerous than pomeranians. I recognize that guns are more dangerous than ropes too but I am still a member of the NRA. I recognize that men are more dangerous than children and I don’t hate men. I recognize that Mount Everest is more dangerous than my bed and I don’t hate Mount Everest either. I am just not willfully stupid.

          • Angela Thomson
          • PrincessLily

            Well lucky you for renting places with no breed restrictions, but just because you have never dealt with them, doesn’t mean I’m lying.
            Your ignorance is glaring, you should check on that.
            Every apartment and even some privately owned rental homes I have looked into or applied to have some sort of breed restrictions on dogs. This usually includes Dobermans, Rottweilers, Chow Chows, etc etc, and then something that said “anything of the Bull type breed.”

          • thepenismightier

            Everywhere I have rented has had breed restrictions and limits the total number of pets allowed (multiple states and cities). Pitts have a bad wrap, even if a majority of them actually are very gentle animals. I’m sure a lot of multi-family residences and apartment communities would rather restrict different breeds than take on the liability of a kid, or another pet for that matter, getting attacked.

            You are right in that any dog or person could pose a threat, but the media hasn’t focused on the vicious golden retrievers and basset hounds, therefore the fear factor and potential liability isn’t there.

          • Rachel

            Most apartments here (in Colorado) Don’t allow specifically – Pits/Huskies/Mastiffs

          • kaththee

            Not completely like “every other dog” because of the WAY they have been bred. The bad breeders have purposely bred aggressive bitch to aggressive stud and then inbred the puppies to make the breed even more aggressive. When you go into a shelter you don’t know how a particular dog was bred. No matter how dogs are bred or how stupidly they are bred many pups will be born without the desired ill temper or whatever ridiculous deformity the breeder sought. So yes, some of the pits even bred badly are sweethearts. Those are fed to the meaner dogs by the likes of Vick unless they get rescued. Then they die in a shelter if they are lucky.

          • Anne Marie Grossman

            Not mine…. sorry.

          • kaththee

            That isn’t the reason. This problem existed before the economy took a nose dive and will continue to get worse no matter what the economy does. The reason is that the pit bulls suffer is that they are the favored breed of ill bred humans who over breed them and rarely spay or neuter their pets. Low life people also breed mean bitch to mean stud and surprise the puppies have poor temperaments. And yet the apologist will insist that the personality of the dog can’t be effected by these efforts to breed them to be aggressive. Now lots of nice people love pit bulls (my best friend has one, my personal trainer had the sweetest dog I have ever met and he was a big pit too, and I have never met a dog I didn’t like. But I despise the pit bull apologist who don’t give a healthy crap about the dogs and how they suffer because of low life PEOPLE who breed them irresponsibly. The pit bull isn’t the only breed that horrible sociopaths have bred with ill intent but it is the breed that has suffered the most because of those type people. Those dogs don’t suffer because of people who “hate” them. Those dogs suffer because of people who supposedly love them.

          • Carol

            Connie, you obviously have NO idea, what you are talking about! I have volunteered at the local shelter and the over 50% pits, were the sweetest, most loving dogs I’ve ever seen. I’ve stepped into several (over 5) random pens with pits on any given day and they try to sit in your lap. You must believe everything that the media spouts? I recommend that you try doing a little research and thinking for yourself?

          • Kate

            That’s so adorable (the sitting in your lap thing), and its sad that so many are in shelters. :(
            I live in the UK where its actually against the law to own one. The penalty is jail for 6 months, a £5000/$8000 fine and the dog gets ‘destroyed’ as they so charmingly put it. Its barbaric.

          • kaththee

            People should have the right to breed a dog into any shape or aesthetic they desire. Never mind if animal dog can’t breathe, give birth normally, or wants to kill your other animals- if that is what a human being wants in a dog they should be able to breed it that way. If you want an animal with no face then you deserve it. So heck with the animal if it can’t breathe. If you want a dog with an awe inspiring PSI jaw strength that was bred to be aggressive then good for you. To heck with your neighbors and their pets (and their stupid snotty kids aren’t worth mentioning). If you want a dog you saw shaped like one in an painting then breed one even if the dog’s head ends up too small for his brain. It looks so adorable so to heck with any excruciating pain that the animal might experience as every heart beat is felt in his head like a hot poker. It is so enlightened to breed monsters and everybody ought to have the right to have any shape or type dog that they desire no matter what the consequences.

          • Stuperfan

            I think Connie’s point was that there are issues with Pits. Even you said over 50% were sweet, but what does that say about the other 40-45%?
            All the Pit lovers need to relax and admit that, just like any other dog, there are issues with Pits. I know it’s not the dogs fault, but there are issues. I’ve experienced the same thing with dobermans, rottweilers, and even shepherds.
            Guess you could say it’s the nature of the beast. :)

          • Emily

            I’m pretty sure she didn’t say that 50% of the pits were sweet. She means that over 50% of the dogs were pits, and they were very sweet

          • jackie heizenreter

            Actually, I have met hundreds of Pitts in my life, as I was a telephone “man” for 27 years. With the exception of 2, they were ALL sweet dogs. I also know 8 Pitts personally, because they belong to friends. There isn’t one of them that doesn’t come running up to be petted. It’s all in how people treat them.

          • kaththee

            No, it is how they are BRED too. Some Rhodesian Ridge Backs don’t have the ridge. Some pits aren’t overly aggressive and mean. But there are people determined to bred mean pit bulls and Rhodesian Ridge Backs with spinal bifida. You can’t claim all that effort is in vain. You can’t possibly claim that they are wasting their time. If you bred aggressive bitch to aggressive stud and then inbred the puppies you can fix the trait. That is what breeders like Micheal Vick did and that is what they are doing now. Those dogs might not be the one that end up in your path but they exist and they do end up languishing in shelters.

          • Deborah

            The beast could be a flippin toy poddle u idiot!

          • kaththee

            Yes and the nature of the idiots who breed them. The dumber the breeder the worse the dog and the breed suffers. Dogs should be bred for a job and not for an aesthetic ideal. For example German shepherds bred for military service/police work are great dogs. The ones bred to fit the ideal of the AKC not so much. I don’t mean that some of them aren’t “sweet”, I mean that genetically they are a hot mess. Pugs are worse. Bulldogs are just pathetic. At some point you wonder when people will wake up to the issues that dogs suffer for human ego. I have come to the firm beliefs that dogs should be bred for a purpose and not for a look.

          • Janey S

            In my opinion, it’s not a Pit’s temperament that’s an issue, in fact, my brother owned a Pit and it was one of the sweetest dogs ever. However, I would never leave it alone with children because of the fact that the dogs are capable of doing major damage when you get one that is ill tempered (which happens with every dog breed). Pits are one of a few different breeds that have the capability to do extreme harm if they do decide to snap, and I would never completely trust any of those breeds.

          • Allison

            so you are saying pit bulls can cause more harm than other dogs? that is not a fact that is just ignorant opinion…they are no different than any other ANIMAL when it comes to damage. Educate yourself and not with this half assed media.

          • Janey S

            Yes, pit bulls CAN cause more damage then many other dog breeds. Compare a pit to a border collie, lab, or terrier, and I guarantee that a bite from the pit would do significantly more damage. However, as I said earlier, they’re not the only breed like that, they, like a German shepherd, rottweiler or doberman, are more of a threat because if their breed physical capabilities. I have nothing against any if these breeds, I just believe in using discretion in how much I would trust them.

          • Deborah

            Come on people, think about it of course any larger dog can do more harm it has harder bite it is the owner to watch it , they are an animal as much as I love mine and treat them as my kids, I know they are not and you can not think they are.

          • Archie Bearden

            That’s right

          • kaththee

            Of course they can do more harm than other breeds. They are bred by idiots to do more harm. Why do you think they are used and BRED to fight? When will they stop blaming the dogs and when will they start blaming the humans? – and by “humans” that means you Allison. You are to blame, not the dogs. Your spin doesn’t help the pits. You are part of WHY dogs suffer. Shame on you. The humans should be punished when a dog kills a dog, cat, child or adult. The human who bred the animal should be the one that is “put down” and not the dog. The person who bought that dog because that is what they fancied should be “put down” and then their estate should be used to take care of that animal for the rest of his life.

          • Deborah

            People , they are animals, and yes I love mine like a person, but I would never leave it alone with a baby we can’t talk to them and have them talk back so it is ours to take of them and those around them!!!

          • Lacey Myownboss Paro

            Just so you know, pits were originally bred to watch over children. They were once known as ‘nanny dogs’ because often times it was the dog that took better care of and protected the children better than the parents. Look it up and you will find family portraits with the children and a PIT BULL. I know because I have pictures of my great grandmother and their family’s nanny dog. It is about the humans and their stupidity when it comes to caring for and breeding dogs. Any dog can be trained to be well tempered, as any dog can be bred to fight. It is still a HUMAN problem because it is the humans who cause the dog’s temperament, either through breeding or through training/abuse.

          • Deborah

            AMEN to that!

          • kaththee

            I actually don’t agree with Connie’s assertion that the pits were surrendered because they weren’t good pits. But on the other hand you can’t say that one can only speak from personal experience. The media doesn’t hate pit bulls. Unfortunately they have been over bred by evil people. It doesn’t mean that they are all bad dogs but you can’t pretend that all that effort into selective breeding was for nothing. The Rhodesian Ridgeback is born without the ridge (a form of spinal bifida) in 1 out of 6 puppies. Nature does try to correct such stupidity but historically the healthy puppy is destroyed so the defect will continue. With pit bulls it is the same. Some will be born sweet non-aggressive submissive dogs and often they will be destroyed. I know people like you don’t give a crap about the numbers of people killed by ill bred dogs, but what about the cats and dogs killed? Will you deny that happens? Will you point to one case of a chihuahua that killed a kitten? I don’t hate pit bulls and I don’t blame the dogs. I HATE stupid people and I blame stupid people.

          • JewelEyedGamerGirl

            Breed specific laws that do not allow pits to be kept are one thing. Another is the irrational fear people continuously put into people about pits keep them from being adopted when a family has to give one up. You’re wrong, people aren’t abandoning pits more, it’s just that too many people abandon all breeds but pits are adopted less.

          • Big M

            There’s a reason. It’s that a bunch of jerk-off’s buy Pits to look like a badass; more so than any other breed. Then they find out that large, powerful dogs are not good for first time owners for a multitude of reasons. Then they end up abandoned. Nothing wrong with the breed. In biology, subspecies, race,
            and breed are equivalent terms. Breed is usually applied to domestic
            animals; species and subspecies, to wild animals and to plants; and
            race, to humans. Colloquial use of the term dog breed, however, does not conform to scientific standards of taxonomic classification. Breeds do not meet the criteria for subspecies since they are all one species. So… Do you believe that a black man is more genetically prone to commit crime vs. a white man? Or is the fact that more crime is committed by blacks simply a product of their environment or their upbringing? Could we say the same of Pit Bulls? BSL is racial profiling.

          • Deborah

            I completely agree Big M!

          • kaththee

            You are so wrong on the genetics of dogs and your correlation to race is laughable. Dog breeds and the methods of producing breeds are based on the eugenics movement. They are ALL inbred to a fix a trait. ALL breeds are messed up to some extent because of this inbreeding. A “breed” doesn’t need to conform to taxonomic classifications to be a messed up human experiment in inbreeding and failed eugenics to produce a better dog. There is no comparison between white and black races/people and dog breeds. Black people aren’t a close breeding group and they don’t inbreed to fix certain traits. Black people and white people breed freely and our gene pools continue to grow which facilitates health. Dogs bred to have a ridge on the back will have a ridge on their backs. Dogs bred to be aggressive will be aggressive. It isn’t racial profiling. That is the stupidest thing I have ever read. These traits are fixed in the breed because human beings selective breed the animal. You are ignorant and racist to compare black people to pit bulls. Disgusting.

          • Big M

            I guess Kaththee needs to take a peek into black slavery in America…selective breeding, inbreeding, and so forth…and it’s not “my” correlation; it’s a scientifically accepted principal…look it up. Lastly, I never said black people are like Pitbulls. I alluded to the fact that more crime, per capita, being committed by blacks is a direct product of their environment, and had nothing to do with the race. Then I said “Could we say the same of Pit Bulls?” I left it up to you to connect the dots, but some people can’t see the forest for the trees…I guess.

          • CC

            If you own your house you can have what ever dog you choose. Many of these poor shelter dogs are there because of fearful landlords telling tennants they have to get rid of their family dog solely based on it’s breed. I’ve known several families that had to rehome happy loyal safe pets simply because they are pit or pit mixes. I have now and in the past had a pitbull family member. I own my house now and they will never tell me which breed I can have ever again.

          • Cyrene Krey

            Actually, home ownership isn’t a guarantee you can have any breed of dog you choose. Some insurance policies won’t cover your home if you own certain breeds. Mine does, but they charge extra depending on the type of dog you have (which can be out of some people’s reach financially). Unfortunately, it’s up to your insurance provider as to whether or not you’re allowed to (or can afford to) have certain breeds. You might want to check with your insurance policy too, because that isn’t something that’s always advertised but can make your policy invalid. Luckily both of my dogs are technically mixes so that’s what I always mark them down as for insurance purposes, otherwise my premium would go up.

          • 23333339v2

            uhhhh….not exactly true: I changed home insurance companies last week and they asked me if I had a dog and what breed. Upon further inquiry they told me they would not issue a policy to me if I owned a pit bull or a Rottweiler and if they later found out I had acquired one they would cancel my policy immediately

          • Cyrene Krey

            Many places are instituting Breed Specific Legislation (BSL, a.k.a. BullSh*t Legislation), which makes having certain breeds difficult or impossible. Pitbulls (not technically a breed, by the way, actually just a description of dogs with a certain “look”), are currently the dog of choice for fighting as well. People are quick to blame the breed when in reality if you look at the facts (and history) it has nothing to do with a specific breed’s disposition, but the stereotypes that being perpetuated by humans. My pitbull was dumped and left to fend for himself because the person who adopted him apparently didn’t realize that he wouldn’t always been a small and cute puppy and wasn’t willing to work with him. Had I not adopted him when I did, he would have been killed. He’s the biggest baby I’ve ever met (refuses to sleep on the floor unless he has a soft bed or blanket, needs to have a jacket or sweater in winter, doesn’t let me start my day until he’s had his morning cuddles, ect.). Humans are the problem, not any specific breed of dog.

          • Allison

            It’s called over breeding. Educate yourself.

          • Jeannie Carle

            If a person moves to my town, they can NOT bring a pit. The city council is ignorant and won’t give them a chance. That’s how SOME pits end up in shelters – also neighbors’ fears and landlords’ ignorance.

          • Scott Therrien

            they dont take care of theres

          • jackie heizenreter

            Pitts are turned into the humane society out of fear, not because they are not good dogs. I was a “telephone man” for 27 years, and they are one of the most popular breeds there is…only met a couple who were not friendly. Some insurance companies will not insure houses if you have a Pitt, and neighbors have actually taken Pitts form houses to turn in because of fear. It is NOT because other owners do not think they are great dogs. Hyper-hysteria at work here.

          • Jennifer

            There’s no such thing as a “pitt”, honey. Are you referring to the American Pit Bull Terrier? The American Staffordshire Terrier? The Staffordshire Bull Terrier? The American Bully? The American Bulldog? Boxers? Cane Corsos? Presa Canarios? Dogo Argentinos? Poorly bred mastiffs? Any mixed breed containing any of the above breeds? Any mixed breed that LOOKS like it may have any of the above breeds in it? (lab mixes often resemble “pit bulls” and are often labeled as such) The media has taken many different breeds and categorized them as one thing: pit bulls. Nearly each of these breeds is extremely popular. And the average person doesn’t know the difference. So all of these breeds together makes up a large portion of the dogs we own as pets. So it makes sense that more of them end up in shelters than others. Plus, with BSL ripping loving pets away from their owners, there’s yet another reason for them to end up in shelters. The problem here is the human element. Not the dogs. Over-breeding of “pit bull” types, especially backyard breeding is a huge problem. But there’s always at least one type of dog that’s in the spotlight. And that type of dog will suffer for it. It’s time to stop acting like the dogs, who have no control over their own fate and who only exist here because of us humans, are the ones at fault.

          • 23333339v2

            that’s rather silly, Jennifer. I doubt if most people have ever seen an actual Cane Corso in their lifetime (same with Presa Canarios and whatever a Dogo Argentino is). But most people know what a boxer is and looks like, as well as a bulldog (although they may not know what type of bulldog it is). Staffordshires and Pit Bulls are the same breed – the Staffordshire moniker is AKC nomenclature.

          • Archie Bearden

            Well I guess u should do ur home work I’ve seen all of those breeds in a small town In al. And they are not all the same u can’t register them as pure bred if u mix them .. and most are not informed to know the deference of it is or isn’t a specific breed because so many think u can call them purebred if u mix them. I know for a fact because I mixed my staff and my pit bull mastiff. So u might want to get the correct info before u tell someone that what they said it’s true.

          • 23333339v2

            Well, Archie, the fact that you have seen those breeds in a “small town in Alabama” indicates to me that the vast majority of people – those that don’t live in that small town in Alabama – have NOT seen those breeds. I once saw a red merle Border Collie – and there are, possibly, 50 of these animals…..in the world. So just ‘cuz I saw one…..well, Archie, you probably get my drift…….

          • Archie Bearden

            No I don’t get what u mean because if I’ve seen more than one ( there is a breeder here for cane corso )in my small town than that means there alot out there some cant afford them but u do have those of us who will pay out the rear to get what dog we want. Also there are several other breeds that they call bully breeds that are here in Alabama to not sure how to spell them all but there are also three other breeds that people have in the more high end city’s my point here is that it don’t matter what dog u see there are many breeds that are made out to be the bully breeds as they are called that don’t have any American bull or pit bull terrier in them just to name the main two that people tend to focus on . All of these dogs are great dogs and u just have to know how to raise them

          • 23333339v2

            Right Archie! You just have to know how to raise them so that they don’t tear the face off several of those small town neighbors (meanwhile there probably 500 other non-Bully breeds out there). Unless you are a dope dealer or dope grower there is absolutely no reason to EVER own a potentially dangerous dog (‘cuz, Archie, there is always one guy out there who DOESN’T know how to raise them). Is this too difficult a concept to understand? I think not.

          • Archie Bearden

            it is very sad that u think so narrow on these dogs I’m not a dope dealer and I have raised these dogs myself . U do not have to be a stereotype to love or own these dogs it people like u who give these dogs bad names when it is ignorance that’s has got u thinking that u have to be a dope dealer really!!!!!! Grow Up these dogs are not mean . It’s all in how u raise them and yes there are people who will raise them to bite ur face off as u said but that is the person’s fault the dog is only doing as it was taught.

          • 23333339v2

            Archie we are never going to agree about these dogs. Too many incidents of viciousness reported for me to think otherwise. Of course not every single one of these dogs is vicious – but many are (regardless of the reason – breeding or how they are raised). It makes no sense for someone in an urban setting to have one of these dogs when around children, etc. Out in the country where they have no social contact – I suppose if that’s what turns you on in a dog, then go for it.

            If the subject were Golden Retrievers we would not be having this conversation. The mere fact that there are incidents of violence with these dogs should tell people to look to the other 500+ breeds available that have no history of violence. Jerry

          • Archie Bearden

            Well I believe that no matter the dog it can be aggressive and that’s my point Goldens can be very aggressive toward people who are not there owner . All dogs can and ur right we will not be able to agree about this because as I do think u shouldn’t leave u children unattended with any dog I don’t believe that if u have children u shouldn’t own a pit I have 4 kids and they range in age at one time I had 4 pits three that where full blooded and one that was mixed with coyote . And never once did they bite or try to bite my family other people who they saw was aggressive to us they tried but they didn’t because I’m a responsible pet owner. I still have one who hasn’t passed and he’s the biggest baby in the world u could come to my house and he would clime in ur lap and lick u. My point if u have never owned one u can’t be objective in this kind of argument because u really don’t know what kind of dog they are. But it has been nice have this discussion even though we don’t see it the same it’s good to be able to try to see things in another’s point of view. cynthia

          • 23333339v2

            good talking with you, Archie. And it’s always good to hear of a responsible dog owner. Bye. Jerry

          • Archie Bearden

            I love what u said . I’m personally in love with all my dogs. I’ve had mixes of the bully breed and purebred. They all are great dogs as well as all of the other dogs I’ve owned . My mother had a malamute and he love her alot and no one could get near her if he thought she was in danger. I just wish people would look at the facts. All dogs are animals as much as we love them and they act like people they are not. And owners should be the ones in the spotlight not any breed of dog.

          • Deborah

            HELLO………Does that not tell you something about the people and not the dog!

          • Dania

            it says there are many ignorant people around that get dogs to gain money from them and are irresponsible owners that do not care about pet overpopulation. I’m amused and disgusted by your ignorance, but then again I guess not everyone deserves having a dog that would give their life to protect their owners in a moment of distress like many pits have done through history… your loss!

          • stephen

            it tells you that as all the dogs are being brought in then re-homed as normal ,The Pitt types are not getting re-homed due to bad press and the fantasy that they are built in dyed in the wool killers so people ignore them , then as time goes by more and more Pitts are coming but never leaving… people are not adopting them and so it becomes a vicious circle when people go into the shelter they see Pitt after Pitt and assume like you do there’s some thing wrong with the breed and ignore them and thus we have what amounts to a breed genocide because the shelters are inundated and they have to make room…they euthanize the PITTS first because they are hardest to re-home so they get both rejected and killed …. Ive never met a bad Pitt because Ive always known loving and good Pitt owners…and thats your real problem put any strong dog in the hands of an idiot or worse an abuser and you get a violent fear based dog..labs,collies what ever and almost all of those ankle biters that never seem to be trained

          • Julie Anderson

            the owners arent capable of being a pet parent to a pit because they are lazy. pits need attention. pits need love, and structure. they have to have certain things to thrive on, or they cannot make it. yes, the other owners do not like them because they arent capable of giving what it takes. thats all.

          • delahaya

            Or a breed that attacks or maims so much. There is a reason most of the shelter dogs there are pits.

          • Cyrene Krey

            When you look at the numbers, approximately 80-90% of all pits are or were living with people who had criminal records. That’s higher than most other breeds (currently, although that hasn’t always been the case, for example when we saw higher rates of violence with rottweilers, German shepherds, ect.). The problem isn’t the breed, it’s the people raising these animals to be aggressive or mistreating them that leads to aggression. There are some fascinating studies out there on this issue, you should look into some of them if you get a chance. It’s very eye opening (and saddening).

          • Archie Bearden

            If u think pits are the only ones that do thes things u have never learned anything about pit bulls or any other bully breed. Do u know u could be talking about a lab mix that looks like a pit or bully breed. And they are just as likely to snap as any dog if u would educate ur self u would see all dogs can be killers or hurt someone or something. Please get ur self educated

          • Renee Reinhardt

            heelers

          • Lesa Siler Evans

            I agree with you 100%.

          • Skip Sisson

            I spent 35years in the home service business in peoples homes. My experience is that at no time can you trust a Pit as a family pet. I know it makes Pit owners angry, but the name Pit Bull should help you realize this breed was created to kill in dog fights. In those 35 years in homes with Pits in them I found, as a dog lover myself, I could not have or trust a Pit around my family. Pits are basically a one owner dog with no others in the home. Neighboring homes have had Pits, and after keeping my wife pined in an out building and another killing our pets I have decided My family will not be at risk again.I know other dogs have turned viscous, but Pits have killed more humans than any other breed. If you want to own a Pit it’s your business. I in the same have the right to protect my family from them.

          • Amanda Cobb

            “but the name pit bull should help you realize this breed was created to kill in dog fights.” Not true. the Pit Bull was created to hunt large game and manage large livestock. the intention was for the powerful dog to bite and hold the large prey until the other animal was exhausted. http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/truth-about-pit-bulls. I would not own a Pit. simply because I have an autistic child and our next dog will be his service dog. Pits don’t really have the temperament for that. Often a dog’s behavior is based on how the owner has treated him. When I was 16 I hand raised a border collie/ german shepherd. he was sweet, loving and ignored the ignorant children who teased him through the fence. when he was 6 months old, a pit owner had his dogs on my high school’s baseball field. a violation of the posted school rules. I was walking my puppy and WITH THE OWNERS ENCOURAGEMENT those pits scaled the fence and playfully attacked my dog. the caps are important. the man was encouraging his pits to “get them.” he was on school property encouraging his large powerful dogs to attack students and other animals. the pits were friendly, but I was frightened and they were well trained, they did not stop until HE commanded them to. I have been bitten by an Irish Wolfhound who wanted my food, a hound who smelled my dog on me and a Chihuahua who just was not nice. My brother was attacked when he was 3 by a husky mix that picked him up and shook him. 20 years later the scars are still on his arm. It is the owner that is the problem, not the breed.

          • Tim

            Well the unfortunate truth about Pit Bulls is that it is in their DNA to be aggressive. No amount of training can remove the hereditary traits passed to that dog. They were selectively bred to be fight dogs…so naturally, the only way to achieve the desired result of a calm, loving pit it to….once more…selective breed only the most passive, loving pits.

          • Dania

            LORD THERE IS SO MUCH HATE TOWARDS THEM IN HER COMMENTS IT’S NAUSEATING HER LEVEL OF IGNORANCE ABOUT THE NANNY DOG BREED!

          • Julie BonzieBean

            Very well spoken mikey..and so very true. Such a sad thing that we have to see these dogs go through this … unfortunate that many dogs cannot learn to trust a human again. .. but it is something that we should all deal with instead of opting to put the dog down.
            Julie

          • Karen
          • Karen
          • Tracey Smith

            Karen has NO IDEA what she is talking about. Mikey is right in that newly rescued and abused dogs can take years (and some never do learn) to learn to trust humans. They haven’t been properly taught and socialized so their owners have to start all over. I had a rescue dog who NEVER did learn to like men again. My ex husband and I rescued him from an abusive situation where a very large man routinely beat him. He did learn to like and obey my ex…for the rest of his life we had to put him away or watch him like a hawk around other men as he refused to give them a chance. Even had a very sweet male friend try his best to “make friends” with him and this dog refused to let his guard down.

          • Mindi Jean

            well said Mikey! thank you

          • Scott Therrien

            i totally agree with you mike i took in a abused huskey had her for 16 years she was always a little skittish and thought she would get hit again but the more i showed her love and did things with her the more she opened up GREAT dog. when she passed away to that day she did still have a nerviness part in her

          • Dorcas George

            It does apply. Dogs who are abused can be more challenging, to be sure, and they may not like everyone, but Karen is right that it is very important for an insecure dog to know they are not in charge.

          • Buddycc35

            I totally agree Mikey444.

          • Jean Earndoggy Strong

            Totally agree, Mikey 444. I am the mother of just such a dog. She chooses her male friends carefully and I can say with perfect truthfulness that if she trusts a man I do too. Completely. And I have a similar background and don’t trust easily either.

          • JeffChartier

            I’ve had a large male Akita puppy (2.5 yrs now) that I rescued 9 months ago and he is great with me but wants to either challenge or eat everyone else. He is extremely wolf like and is either being protective or territorial or both and I don’t know what to do other than take him back soon. He has been ok with very, very few people and primarily seems to not like women.

          • Shawn Mac

            since most abusers are male? can you show me where you get this fact from?

          • Carol

            I agree. Our neighbors adopted an abused dog. We lived next to them for 13 years and only once did she ever let me pet her – she never let my husband within ten feet of her.

          • SLN

            I agree i’ve had mine for 3 years. still doesnt trust me or my family fully.

          • Karen

            Reading this you would think every single dog ever bought from a shelter was “abused”! Most dogs have not been abused, it’s just an excuse people use for their dog’s bad behavior. And it feeds their own egos going around telling everyone about their “abused” dog! Unless you know for a fact your dog has been abused (documentation, clear physical indicators such as burn marks, scars, etc.) it probably hasn’t been abused. It’s just poorly behaved. Even if it HAS been abused, it’s still not excuse for holding the dog back from being what he could be. If someone can’t train their dog themselves (understandable), find someone who can. But stop with the “he was abuuussssssed” Even dogs that have spent years in puppy mills or research labs (talk about abused) have gone on to lead normal “dog” lives with proper training. Now cue more butthurt with all the “YOU DON’T KNOW *MY* DOG”, “my dog WAS abused”…
            http://www.sdhumane.org/site/DocServer/BT_K9-Was_Your_Dog_Abused.pdf?docID=608
            http://www.fortunatek9.com/Articles/The_Abuse_Excuse_Julia_V_McDonough.pdf
            http://www.embracepetinsurance.com/hot-topics/history-of-abuse-no-excuse-for-pet-bad-behavior
            http://www.adoptastray.com/pages/images/pages/puppymill.pdf

          • Crysania

            While i agree that most have not been abused, many HAVE been poorly socialized. Which is why some have such intense fear issues. They have not met a lot of people or dogs or seen the world outside nearly enough. And unsocialized dogs are fearful dogs. Some react by trying to hide, some react by trying to make the scary thing go away and so look “aggressive.” Fear takes time to work with.

          • Crysania

            Even if they’re not abused and were simply neglected or not socialized, it can take years to trust people.

          • Kathleen Powell

            I actually have a newly rescued dog who was abused. he %100 trusts us, and has proved recently that he accepts anyone who comes into our home, or who we introduce him to.

        • Elizabeth Maguire

          Well maybe you should stop being such a c u next Tuesday and give those nice people who have rescue dogs the number of your trainer or the website you got all your information from so they can be as well informed as you are on how to make a perfect dog and be the perfect pet owner

          • Karen
          • Elizabeth Maguire

            I’m not interested in learning how to boil bunnies crazy lady. Thank you for the offer though

          • Karen

            It wasn’t an “offer” DS, you asked.

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            I was referring to the comment you made earlier about all the excuses you hear in person. Clearly nobody in this comment section wants your advice!! Why don’t you take those 5 dog titles out of your ass and open your eyes. Do us all a favor and just become a crazy cat lady. Meow

          • Karen

            Keepin’ it classy!

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            Keeping it Real

          • Carlie Lamiroy

            Karen, you might find this article very interesting. It’s by Dr. Sophia Yin, who is a dog trainer as well as a vet. She started out doing competitive obedience with her dogs 15-20 years ago when “old school” methods were the thing (and she used them herself, with plenty of success), and has since come around to positive methods. She talks about dominance theory and the science behind behavior modification.
            http://drsophiayin.com/philosophy/dominance?/dominance.php

          • Karen

            I actually have read a multitude of articles on this subject. However, while I’m not arguing that they exist, I’ve never in my personal experience seen a dog trained with “purely positive” methods be reliable under distractions or out in the “real world”, I while I’ve seen hundreds of dogs well-trained and reliable using “balanced” methods. I’ve also seen, read, and have personal knowledge of problem dogs, some with severe issues, having been through the gamut of “positive” trainers and “behaviorist” (~eye-roll~) with the final result being the recommendation that the dog be PTS, then having a real trainer completely fix the issue in a short time.

            I did get caught up a little bit in the cookies and “purely positive” movement when I got my current dog because who wouldn’t want training to be all rainbows and unicorns! I quickly learned (as many have) it worked great inside, with no distractions, but didn’t produce reliable results. I abandoned the “theories” and went back to what has worked forever. I’ve also heard more than one obedience judge talking lament the “good ol’ days” when dogs were properly trained and behaved in the ring. It’s no secret that overall, dogs today are much more poorly behaved than they were say in the 50s, 60s, 70s. Heck, now they’re even pushing to have the group sits and stays removed from Competition Obedience because so many dogs can’t even do them without breaking! We keep dumbing down the tests rather than addressing the training issues. Anyway, that’s just my opinion and I don’t really care how others trained their dogs as long as they aren’t a menace to others (such as letting their dogs approach mine on a sidewalk or having it pulling and lunging like a lunatic when we walk by). People can train or not train their dogs however they like and it makes no difference to me. But I’ll train my dogs with reliable methods that have stood the test of time, and keep fixing a few of the others that people have screwed up and discarded.

          • sweetone100percent

            Had you really known anything about “the ring” you would know that many of the dogs in “the ring” are abused, to obtain the types of reactions you see on the t.v. and concerning them behaving outside, consistently, maybe you just don’t know what to do?

          • Karen

            My dog has five titles – while I’m not a seasoned multi-OTCH, I do know something “about the ring”. My dogs DO behave consistently in the ring and outside.

          • Carlie Lamiroy

            Well, for the record, I have seen literally hundreds of dogs with a myriad of issues (resource guarding, body handling, dog reactivity, fear) rehabbed using positive reinforcement/classical conditioning. As for off leash, one of my dogs has a perfect down stay and recall that’s even reliable in the face of bunnies or at the dog park. He also has a bomb-proof “drop it” – he has dropped everything from delicious cow manure to live baby birds on command. The other dog not so much, only because it hasn’t been a priority for us, and having a baby cut into her training time a bit! But she’s young yet and I have no doubt we’ll get her there once we focus on it again.

            For your average dog, a training method is only as effective as the trainer’s motivation, dedication, and consistency, and I think that’s true no matter the method you use! For a dog with profound behavioral issue, I have seen positive methods work wonders. I can only speak from my own experience, but at the shelter I work at I’ve seen MANY dogs who were set back behaviorally by aversive training methods!

          • Karen

            We obviously base our opinions on our own experiences. If I’d had the experience you have, I no doubt would feel the same as you! I’ve read and heard others speak just the opposite. It’s a raging debate that has been going on for at least a decade if not longer and I have no doubt the two sides will never come together. I think whatever method someone wants to use, if it works for them, great. If it doesn’t, then it’s time to consider something else. If I had a dog that was not responding in a positive way to my methods, I would certainly move on to something else. If I were out at the park or somewhere else and I saw a very well-behaved dog and I asked about its training (which I have many times) and the person told me they used only PP methods, I would say “Tell/show me more!”.

          • kiochi018

            Look, you’re absolutely entitled to your opinion and it’s obvious that you love dogs–but your ability to lump all dogs of a breed into one category (pitbulls are bad dogs that bite people) is upsetting and infuriating. No one is asking you to foster a pitbull, to adopt one, or anything else of the sort. The fact of the matter is yes, there are some bad pitbulls, but yes there are some great ones. I was terrified of pitbulls before I started volunteering at a local shelter and now they are one of my favorite breeds (and no I don’t do or sell drugs, I’m not involved in any sort of illegal activities etc.). I knew someone who had a pitbull and was extremely irresponsible with his dog. He specifically told me that he got the dog to “protect his sh*t”. He never trained the dog properly, never worked on socializing the dog properly and wanted the dog to be aggressive to intimidate and scare others. When the dog got sick, he didn’t want to pay the vet bills and he dropped the dog off on the side of the road and even though I looked for that puppy, I never found him. What kills me is the way that he was bringing that puppy up, it could have bitten someone and seriously hurt them. Furthermore, the people he got the dog from probably had zero knowledge about breeding these dogs, but they saw their opportunity to sell these “fad” dogs because idiots like that guy I knew would want them. He got this dog because it was cheap, available, and he thought it would make him “cool”. For all we know, the parents of all these puppies could have awful temperaments or problems that they’re passing on to these puppies.

            I’ve been bitten by a Cane Corso and a Sharpei. I had a Cocker Spaniel try to bite me and the dog I’ve been most afraid of was a Chihuahua who would attack her own owners (and make them bleed) with little warning. When you look at lists of dangerous breeds they’re all bigger dogs (as they should be) purely because they can do more damage, but most are less human aggressive than their smaller counterparts.

            BTW the main person who put together those lovely dogbreedinfo resources has an entire section on how she raised her boxer, and then after that, her pitbull who seems to be leading a very happy life without any problems. In fact, I’m pretty sure her cats put that pitbull in his place when he was still a puppy. Just because they’re the fad breed that morons are taking advantage of doesn’t mean they’re all bad. She and Cesar Milan have some great things to say about pitbulls (that involve educating yourself, understanding them and training them appropriately).

            The only person I actually know who has been bitten by a pitbull was bitten because when his dog and the pitbull started playing, he freaked out, went up to the pitbull, grabbed it by the neck and shoved its face into the ground. Does that sound like safe behavior? No. You shouldn’t do that to ANY strange dog regardless of the breed, yet everyone blamed the pitbull. If I were a dog and I was goofing off and some stranger choked me and shoved my face into the ground I probably would have bitten them too.

            Let’s not lump all dogs of one breed together like that. We can all come up with examples on both sides of the spectrum. We can both provide “experts” and “articles” that support our personal belief systems. Let’s just acknowledge that in every breed there’s going to be some that don’t represent the breed well and some that are exemplary examples of what the breed should be.

          • Amber

            Karen, I again ask you to post scientific based evidence that pits are innate killers. NOT anecdotal.

          • Carlie Lamiroy

            Elizabeth, try dogstardaily.com. It’s a site run by Ian Dunbar, who is one of the most well-respected trainers in the world, and has a lot of great advice about using positive training methods with your dog, plus links to further resources.

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            Thanks Carlie, I’m very lucky my dog is a rescue with no issues besides occasionally peeing on his own feet, being fantastic and loving carrots too much!!

          • Tommy Turek

            Don’t worry about the peeing Elizabeth all men pee on there feet lol

          • Cyn McCollum

            Dunbar used to be somebody, now he’s just a drunk with a lot of acolytes and far too many hands if you get caught in an elevator with him.

          • Anthony

            I wish all of you crazy women would stop arguing about this topic.
            It does not matter what you think of it, but it is what anyone else thinks!
            I can not understand why you are arguing about this.

            Grow up people!!!!!!

        • Chris

          There is no way in hell i would ever let you near my dogs. It is obvious you are NOT a trainer. You have never been to school for it. I am guessing no one here would ever hire you to help cause it sounds like you would do more damage that good. Pets are part of our families and need love, unconditionally. True dog lovers look at them as if they are our children, not livestock or property (which is what i get from your posts). Stop giving advice, it is terrible.

          • Karen

            I never said I was a professional trainer, however with the results I’ve gotten, I get asked all the time to train dogs. I’ve had countless strangers ask me to take on their dogs. I was asked twice this week. One is still working on me and I may relent, only because she’s a neighbor I like. I have no desire to work with the owners, most who don’t really want to put in the effort it takes to have a well-balanced dog. I work fostering dogs and do the training for free. The rescue organization is very pleased with my training and are thrilled I’m placing dogs that have lingered for months with no interest. True dog lovers look at dogs as DOGS and treat them accordingly. Treating them like humans is what has our shelters full. http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/articles/humandog.htm

          • Karen

            I work full-time and I still manage to put in about 2 hours a day on the foster dogs with daily structured walks, field time, and training. I buy high quality food, beds, training collars, and supplies out of my own pocket. I use my free time to get them out and about and seen in public. I spend my weekends sitting at adoption events. And I do it for the dogs, for FREE, so don’t talk to me about being a “true dog lover”.

          • Tommy Turek

            My Pitt Bull was so well behaved that people used to ask me to train there dogs I said no I’m not a trainer I just got along with my dog and she listened to me. Maybe I should open a dog trainning school now because people asked me to train there dogs.

          • Ginny Howland Kipp

            Your are an ASS!!!! Dogs or any other pet are part of your family!!!
            Maybe you should go live in the shelter and see what it it feel’s
            like!!! maybe then you will know what it’s like to be part of a family
            and loved!!!

          • Brandy Miller

            I don’t really see how or where she’s saying that she doesn’t love the dogs, or treat them as part of her family. What she is saying is that dogs aren’t people. They don’t think like people, they think like dogs do. There’s no question that she loves the dogs, that’s why she does what she does – so that they don’t end up destroyed or being abandoned because they can’t get along in a human household.

          • Domenic Decesare

            There is nothing wrong with treating your dog like a human so to speak because dogs and humans share almost the exact same basic psychological traits that we use from the time we are babies and they are puppies. For example, a human or a dog will take advantage of another when they see it works to their advantage. An example of that is when you have a human baby “crying” in its crib, there are many times it will fake it cuz it knows its parent will come in and either pick it up or give it attention in some way. That is taking advantage for its benefit. The puppy, if crated, will also after some time make the connection that when it whines in the night that it will get the attention from the owner and it will be either talked to or let out or whatever.
            Again, not every instance of a baby or puppy whining is to manipulate its parents or owners but after a little bit both make the connection that they get something when they do. This is just ONE example of how both a dog and human have the exact same basic primal instincts that humans these days don’t even realize anymore because they have been blinded with technology and other things. And a lot of the same techniques, like ignoring bad behavior and rewarding good behavior are used both very effectively in both humans and dogs. These are just a small sample size of how similar a dog and a human are from a psychological standpoint

          • loreebee

            Infants are too young to “manipulate”. Crying is a means of communication, not manipulation at that age.

        • Nikki Smith

          Karen, as a dog trainer, you couldn’t be more in the wrong..

          • Samantha

            Karen may or may not be a dog trainer, but Karen is definitely a TROLL. A very good one-but a troll none-the-less. I’d bet money on it.
            And if somehow I lost because I was wrong (even though there’s no way anyone besides her can know the real answer to that) then Karen is at the very least an argumentative attention seeker. No positive comments in your history. No comments even AGREEING with someone else’s side of the argument. Only a bunch of very unpopular opinions, personal stories for every situation that comes up with details that are vague at best (what titles does your dog hold? which rescue do you foster dogs from?), comments full of links and links and links to prove people wrong, and excessive long-winded debate arguements (usually ending in some way that continues to flame the fire). This is either a troll, or a stubborn, obnoxious woman who wouldn’t have many real life folks who could stand her so she has to engage in banter on the internet. Thoughts it’s nuts how she has time for it at all, what with the full time job, EVERY weekend shelter volunteering, volunteer training during the week, rescues she takes care of, dog shows she competes in with her own dog who has somehow managed to take vacations to SIX foreign countries with Karen in less than three years of life and done all sorts of exciting Air-Bud sounding stuff like ‘ride jet skis’..yeah.

            Troll or ‘real-but-abrasive-and-incredibly-rude’ individual..whichever she is, shes’s starting arguments on articles for no reason, and even if it starts with good reason it ends with sarcastic and patronizing comments that insult other commenters and contribute nothing valuable to the general discussion. Uncool.

        • Diana V Britz

          Hi Karen, my mother had a way with animals and in two weeks she could have a animal seeming happy and loving, but that animal could turn if something reminder it of the neglect or abuse it went through. No one can say that they can guarantee a animals behavior. A dogs natural instincts is to protect Karen and it is not it’s last resort. Sometimes dogs can read a person and they can become aggressive towards someone, because they may know something that we don’t. I must say this Karen. If what I have read by your comments and others that you say YOU can train any dog, then why is it you do not think Pit Bulls deserve rehabilitation? I am not trying to be rude, but if your as good as you say you are then training a Pit would be no problem. Here is a fact; More people are bitten by other breed of dogs than Pits; that’s a fact. Only reason it seems that Pits are more aggressive is because of media portraying them as viscous dogs. Yes, just as with every animal, there are a few in their breed that are more aggressive, but just like horses, cats, birds, etc. there is always that small percentage. Every animal deserves a chance.
          Let’s say if I am approaching a couple and they have a chihuahua and a pit bull, I have a harder time reading a chihuahua. Chihuahua are known to be more aggressive and more likely to bite.

        • Russel Vaspol

          Karen dont get a dog cause you have no idea what you are talking about.

        • Ramona FuzzyBunny Ledwon

          Sorry Karen you are wrong. I have a rescue and have had her for 11 years and she still has issues from her severe abuse she endured before me. And that was all of 10 months worth! We show her love and security but she still has not over come her fears. Just like in people some abuse is still to difficult to deal with. I would like you to tell a person who endured physical abuse of any kind to try and get over it or deal with it. Many can, many can’t.
          Animals have different personalities and not all deal with abuse and not all can get over it. If you are a true dog trainer you should also like all breeds of dogs. You should also understand that some dogs no matter what you do will always have issues.

          • Karen
          • Ramona FuzzyBunny Ledwon

            You can post all the articles you want but when it comes down to it if an animal cannot get over his or her abuse there is nothing you can do. I have had a professional trainer of police dogs help me with her but her abuse was far too bad for her to get over her issues. She has come a long way but she will never be “fixed”. Again I say they all have different personalities and some can over come their abuse and some not. You can’t tell a child who was sexually abused or physically abused that with therapy will “get over it” cause that is not true. They may be able to adapt but they will be scared forever. We show our girl so much love and support but we still have to watch her. And after 11 years of tons of love and support she still has her fear and jealousy issues.
            I am not saying what is written is not true and some cases it may not help at all. My point is not all animals including humans have the ability to “get over it” or deal with it. It is not 100% reliable in all cases.

        • Randy Snyder

          Karen, It amazes me the attacks you are getting here. Personally I’d love to speak with you about my dog and maybe finding you or someone in the Metro Atlanta area that does your style of
          training. Please find and PM on Facebook

        • Deb Waddell

          you have no idea what you are talking about. You and Ceasar need to find a new hobby

          • Karen

            While I’m quite flattered that you’ve referred to me in the same vein as Cesar, for him it isn’t a “hobby”; it’s a lucrative profession, passion, and career and he’s extremely successful at what he does. He can make changes in a dog in moments that you would never be able to do in a lifetime (or me for that matter). While a couple of my neighbors and a few friends jokingly refer to me as “the Dog Whisperer”, it really is just a hobby for me. But it’s working for me so I don’t think I need a new one just yet.

        • Penny Ellen Woods

          Karen- you are so full of it! Sampson knows that I am his alpha dog. Many a time, I have grabbed him by his collar & put him on his back….he weighs 105 lbs. now & that is no easy feat! “Protect only as a last resort”? What does that mean? If you can break into my house & get to me, you have had to have already shot my dog…then I am really pissed & grabbing my “last resort of protection”….it’s called MY GLOCK!

          • Karen

            ROTFL!

        • That Man

          Your condescension might fool some ignorant people, but this person said that when they tell the dog that everything is ok, they listen. That sounds like someone who is in charge of their pet to me.

        • Sara

          Ummm. You’ve got it all wrong. My dog is fear aggressive towards children and men. However, I’ve raised him since he was 10 weeks old, he WAS NOT abused prior or anything. I raised him KNOWING that I was in charge, my husband as well. He respects us and will never show aggression towards us, he also trust us A LOT. However, he gets very anxious around small children and men especially. He was also highly socialized as a puppy and even attended training classes. His anxiety actually just hit a new level in his early adulthood and he has been seen by his Vet about it. Some dogs, esp. known breeds, have a tendency to be more anxious and/or cautious around strangers, and it surely doesn’t make them a bad dog!

        • SHAWSHANK

          I bet you’re the kind of person who’s kid never does anything wrong because of superb parenting right? Idiot.

          • Karen

            Look, if this person is happy with their dog in this state and it doesn’t bother them, more power to them! I don’t really care. They can let it live out the rest of its life that way if that’s what they want – it’s their dog. If everyone wants to walk their dog with a yellow ribbon and hope and pray that no one comes near their little “protective”, “nervous”, “fear aggressive”, “abused” dog, GREAT! I don’t have to live with that dog. If what they are doing is producing a happy, confident dog, they won’t need a yellow ribbon or to worry about a wayward child or dog. People can make every excuse in the book about why *their* dog is “different” or so special that it won’t respond the way thousands of other dogs have responded and I don’t care. I not putting a gun to anyone’s head and forcing them to do anything with their unstable dogs! If they get sued for their dog biting, I don’t care! If they have to have their dog put down, I don’t care. If they dump their dog at the shelter because they can’t deal with what they’ve created, I don’t care. Care factor – ZERO. The information on how to prevent and fix these problems and the people that can do it are readily available. At the end of the day, you have the kind of dog you want.

        • Suellyn Danter

          My JR is 10, he loves people,and cats, put a dog within biting range.. and he is one it..sometimes you can’t fix the ghosts in their heads… I would rather be proactive with him, than get sued because someone let their dog off leash and he nailed it.

        • Justin Williams

          Your only trying to help, what works for you doesn’t always work for someone else, some are leaders some aren’t. I’m not, my sister is.

        • Susan Brown-Miller

          Karen you are wrong with the animal being nervous because of WHO is alpha!

          I had a blue healer from 6 weeks old and he was the most nervous high strung dog I have ever owned. If ANYONE raised their voice he would run and hide, and let me add HE WAS NEVER ABUSED OR A RESCUE, that’s just who he was.

          I would bet you a million dollars that my Chihuahua would bite ANYONE before my pitbull would. The only reason bitbulls have a bad rep is because of the scum that uses them for fighting. That is the ONLY reason statistics are so high.

          I owned Doberman’sback in the 80′s when Doberman’s were sooooooo bad and my kids could do whatever they wanted to either one of them. The only reason they had a bad rep is because they were trained guard dogs. You need to read up on your info.

          German shepherds are still number one in attacks because of the police force using them as police dogs and the same for service dogs. They ARE TRAINED TO ATTACK!

        • Spike5

          That’s nonsense. Dogs, like people, have different personalities. Some are laid back and relaxed and others are nervous and timid. Your dog can trust you totally and still not want to be approached by strangers.

        • Delima05

          Do you own any rescue ?

          mine was abused as well. and acts very protective as well.

          then again we trained her to bark the second someone rings the door bell, or makes any noise outside the house.

          she’s very jealous as well. I am the owner and if there’s a baby, a girl, or even a friend whos sitting close by, she will jump inbetween us instantly .

          When I’m at home she’s with more right about 95% of the time. Every time I get up she’s behind me so I am most diffidently the dominate leader.

        • Amanda Marie

          This is either pure ignorance or a lack of knowledge/experience with the breed. My best friend has 2 pitbulls. Diesel was a rescue from the hood in NYC. We’re not sure if he was a fighting dog or not, but he is very afraid of men, and certain really strange things, like the sound of crunching waterbottles. He was badly abused and it was very hard at him, at first, to get along with other dogs and even some people, but with a good home and like you said – structure, it is very much so possible to rehabilitate pits. It’s all about the upbringing of the dog, in my eyes. He is the single most loving dog I have met in my life, never bit ANY human, ANY dog, and is nothing short of the most affectionate dog I have ever come into contact with. She also has another pit, Teeco, who is absolutely perfect, behavioral wise, and that’s because she had him from when he was a puppy and trained him the proper way and gave him more than enough affection. I’m a psych major, and dogs are a lot like humans in that regard; if you constantly shit on somebody, they turn out to be bitter. When that person starts to feel loved and appreciated, they get a better outlook on life and start to reciprocate those feelings back. It’s the same with dogs! I’m 19 years old, and it may not seem like I have much experience, but TRUST ME, I do. My grandparents bred great danes, as well as my parents. I’ve helped take care of numerous litters of puppies from my own dogs. They are also big and “scary-looking” to some, but they are gentle and loving. Big mushes, I’m telling you. The most recent dog I have, who is a dachshund/beagle mix, is more aggressive and bites more than Diesel, Teeco, and my danes put together. Whatever you think you know, you should re-evaluate the LIVING SH*T out of, because everyone saying that their pits are loving, kind, affectionate, etc. aren’t lying, it’s the honest truth!

        • Jerrie Hayley Klenk

          Where in the world did you get your canine education? Wow!

        • PeaceBang

          No, they can’t. Express your opinion: fine. But don’t make statements that have never been proven and that fly in the face of the experience of millions of responsible dog owners.

        • Mindy James

          “Doesn’t trust you as a leader”?????? My dog would fight to the death protecting me but he drops to a prone position with a flick of one of my fingers. Pretty sure he trusts AND respects me as “his leader” and nervous he is not. But he IS dog aggressive and leery of strangers and I’ve owned him from 12 wks. I have no idea why he is the way he is. There were no traumatic experiences, no abuse, no anything. He has had the benefit of my 30 yrs of experience, the benefit of 2 other respected behavioral trainers and no amount of work has changed him. Structure…nah….no effect. But hey, thanks for your “knowledge” on the subject. Oh yeah! Forgot to ask.. Where did you get your education/experience that allows you to pontificate with such authority?

        • Ryan Gonzales

          https://www.facebook.com/LarryTheDog

          This dude right here is an example of a Pit that was trained properly, isn’t aggressive, and is super obedient.

          You contradict yourself when first saying that all dogs need is training and structure – and then go on to essentially say Pits are a broken breed lol…

        • Fred Bock

          Hate to disagree, but, I had 2 dachshunds. Very friendly when I was with them (or my wife). If you stepped into my yard, they were on you like white on rice. They didn’t attack, but, they’d circle you about 10 ft away so you had no chance of catching them, and they made a devil of a racket.
          Once we showed up, and told them it was ok, they’d go say hello.
          The dogs instinct is to protect the pack, until such time as an alpha says not to.
          The fact that they didn’t do anything other than alert does tie back to socialization. They both met hundreds of people, so new people weren’t an automatic threat.

        • Matt Robinson

          You are a weak person with your worthless opinions. Do the world a favor and keep them to yourself!!!

        • Chaoticblu

          That may be true to a point, but obviously it takes time for a new dog and owner to get used to each other and get that structure. So yes it’s totally understandable for a newly rescued dog to be skiddish and nervous and I agree with Mikey that sometimes a dog (or any pet) might not ever be completely the same after abuse..I mean it’s the same for humans.

        • Vapemans

          Wow Karen, let me guess, you’re a PET PSYCHIC

          • Karen

            Meh, you don’t need to be a pet psychic to train dogs. They aren’t that hard. What I wrote isn’t an original – it’s pretty much common knowledge among successful trainers. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel; the information and/or teachers are out there. ( http://hubpages.com/hub/Why-Some-Dogs-Become-Protective-of-Owners) Like in every aspect of life, there are people who *do* and people who make excuses for not doing. To be certain, making excuses is MUCH easier; I do it myself sometimes. But eventually, when something becomes important enough to me, I stop making the excuses and *do*.

        • Justin Case

          I sure hope there are no dogs under your care. Your comments scare me. Please train with a sane professional.

        • Sarah Douma Schweighardt

          I have all three – dog from a private breeder, a rescue who was a stray and wound up in a kill shelter and a puppy mill breeding mom who survived YEARS of neglect and evidently abuse. I believe in leadership, but nervousness and anxiety in the puppy mill dog persists. I believe in structure and exercise too, but the mill dog is not able to process “structure” the same way that my other dogs do. As a general guideline, fine, but you can not lump all dogs together and warning others that rushing up to your dog will not be good because it might scare the dog or the dog might scare a child seems like something that no one would find fault with, but on the internet – everything becomes controversial and experts appear equipped with no credentials and a superficial understanding of the problem. Sheesh.

        • VirtualBondGirl

          I have to agree with Mikey 444 and Elizabeth: you don’t sound like you have any idea of what you’re talking about. My dog well knows I’m in charge and his leader, however he is still afraid of a broom (while I’m sweeping), he has issues with loud noises, and is very protective of me and my sisters. These things are not “trained out” of a dog. Just like people, they have traumas and fears. To ignore that and assume ALL dogs can be trained the same is to be ignorant of the unique personality of each dog and arrogant.

          And by the way, I do not want my dog protecting me as a “last resort,” I want him to protect me when he perceives a threat, because that last resort may end up being too late.

        • Jenna Collins

          @disqus_DZH4FgMxgz:disqus I can honestly say that I can see where you are coming from, for the uneducated and closed minded, prejudice is such an easy solution to fear.

          You can post links all day long on horror stories about pit bulls, I can post horror stories all day long about any breed. And I literally mean ANY breed. Is an attack from a pit bull more fatal than an attack from a chihuahua? Yes it is. A pit bull is larger, stronger, and has bigger teeth. If a chihuahua was the size of a pit bull, it could kill you too. So stating that an animal’s ability to be more fatal does not necessarily mean, AS A WHOLE, they are more apt to biting. In lamens, this means just because a pit bull can kill you if it bites you, does not mean that it has more recorded bites than any other breed of dog. Which in fact, it does not have the largest recorded amount of attacks in ANY YEAR in ANY COUNTRY EVER.

          I am the owner of a pit bull, and my mother who is ill and living with me so that I am able to take care of her, is the current owner of a 15 year old pit bull, who she literally birthed from her mother 15 ears ago. This dog has never bitten in his 15 years, nor has never attempted to bite. His mother, in her 8 years on this Earth had also never bitten, who my mother had owned since she was 6 weeks.

          When I was a child my mother would take me to pit bull dog shows (these shows consist of conformation as well as weight pull (putting weights on a track and harnessing the dog to the weights and them pulling it down the track) ) within Missouri and a few surrounding states. I have been raised with pit bulls and have had a pit bull in my house consistently for nearly 10 years or my life (I’m 27). I have seen literally thousands of pit bulls in my lifetime. Literally thousands. Where they interacted with hundreds of other dogs and humans at these shows and not once have I ever witnessed one of these dogs biting another person or biting another dog.

          I have raised them, birthed them, breathed into their noses when they weren’t breathing on their own when they were born, trained them, and loved them for more years in my life than I have without. I have owned(as a child with my mother) in entirety dozens of pit bulls as my mother’s female was a breeder for show dogs. And I have never, not once, been bitten by any of them.

          One thing that people do not realize, is that any dog, ANY DOG, including my pit bulls, your dogs included, can be provoked to biting. Any official trainer will tell you this. Poor training, fear, neglect, abuse, poor supervision, and anyone trying to provoke an animal can cause an animal to bite. It is a fear response.

          Unfortunately, from your comments I’ve noticed that your ignorance and prejudice blinds you so terribly to the truth. And the truth is quite simply that EACH INDIVIDUAL DOG NO MATTER THE BREED IS DIFFERENT. The same as humans. Your bigotry towards pit bulls sounds like something straight out of a conversation that would have happened 100 years ago about black people. Uneducation, fear, closed-mindedness, and ignorance cause you to believe that every single pit-bull breathing today is a dog that is going to bite or kill a person. When, in fact, there have been more pit bull dogs in history who have not bitten than have bitten.

          I’m not asking you to own a pit bull or to advocate for them, I’m asking you to stop the ignorant prejudicial mudslinging. Educate yourself. Speak to people who actually know about pit bulls. People who have raised them and trained them, not just read horror stories on the internet in which you frighten yourself and automatically believe every terrible thing you’ve ever heard is true.

        • emily

          Wow what an assessment with NO evidence at all to support it – one that’s insulting to the friendly rescue people who posted!

        • Stirfry

          Do you offer any constructive advice or just condemnation?

        • Crysania

          Please no one listen to this lot of rot. Someone here is just regurgitating the crap spewed by a certain TV reality star and clearly knows nothing about dogs.

        • Karen

          A lot of butthurt over a simple statement that can be found from many sources with tons of experience with these types of dogs. You might ask yourselves why you’re so defensive.

          • Crysania

            Are you replying to yourself Karen? The fact is you seem to be listening to dark ages stuff about dogs. Please read some recent research. I would start with something like Raymond Coppinger’s book on Dogs. He actually did research on feral dog populations and found they do not form packs. If you keep listening to people like Cesar Millan you’re not actually going to learn anything about dogs. Most of the dogs who need the yellow ribbon are not being protective. They’re fearful and need space, either from other dogs or people. Working with fear issues takes time. Playing “pack leader” and “dominating” a dog will do nothing but increase fear and make this problem worse in the future. Please stop speaking up if you don’t actually know anything. You have posted so much ignorance here it makes my brain hurt.

        • KJ

          Wow, that’s a lot of arrogance and inaccurate information. Perhaps you should do a little more research.

        • Kell Ahlers

          My boy was born deaf and i use a yellow bandanna to let people know we need more space. He’s not aggressive even when startled, but i can see the panic in him when he doesn’t see someone coming first. Aggressive dogs can be turned around in most cases, but some have just been too traumatized for too long. Even with the most structure sometimes they will only Bond with one person and having a child run at them can be terrifying. Fear biting is real and sometimes cannot be fixed. Doesn’t mean the dog is bad, doesn’t mean the owner is bad. Taking precautions is the responsible thing to do for your furry loved ones!

        • Veneta Britt

          I remember when it was German Shepard’s,, then the Doberman Pincer and then the Rottweilers were supposed to be the “worst breed ever” seems like every 12 to 15 years another dog breed becomes the “Demon Breed”. Not sure how or why it happens but in the late 60′s to the 70′s it was the shepherd and then somewhere in the 70′s to the mid to late 80′w it was the Doberman and then the Rottweilers until the Pit Bulls became the hated and despised breed.

        • Henri

          What a load of rubbish! Sorry but it’s true. I have had dogs all my life, so have my parents and their parents and grandparents. I work with rescued animals daily. A dog will see you as the leader and still protect, my dog does just this. In my experience people who do excessive “structured exercise” and “on the chart training” don’t know the first thing about animals of any kind and often end up completely ruining them. I agree undoubtedly in training a dog (people who never handle animals really really bug me), but when people overdo this (especially with rescues) it makes the situation much worse. I took my old sheepdog to a “structured training class” once and it made him extremely unhappy for over two following weeks! It takes years for rescue dogs (or any kind of animals) to learn to trust again. I say this from a lifetime of working with rescues, what experience do you have?

          • Karen

            Really? They “don’t know the first thing about animals”? So why are these some of the most successful trainers in the country? Why do some of them have waiting lists? Why are these the one’s getting $2,000-$3,000 a month to train a dog and even more to give seminars? How have these trainers successfully trained THOUSANDS of dogs if they “don’t know the first thing” about them? How are these trainers able to take entire packs of dogs out in public and perform obedience commands off-leash in crowded areas? How have these trainers rehabilitated hundreds of dogs that had been through multiple other trainers and “behaviorists” (lol)? Why are so many people reaching out to these trainers after all else has failed? HOW THE HELL ARE THEY PULLING THIS OFF WHEN THEY “KNOW NOTHING ABOUT ANIMALS”? Having dogs “your whole life” hardly makes you an expert.. Working with rescue animals daily doesn’t make you an expert. Plenty of people spend their whole lives doing something poorly and never improving. Just because *you* can’t do this doesn’t mean someone with better skills can’t!

        • Jennifer

          This coming from the lady who says “if one of my dogs showed *any* aggression to one of my kids it would be at the vet for a dirt nap just as soon as I could drive it there.” There would be no question about YOU being a.. how did you put it? “Dog owner FAIL”. Just the fact that you “BUY” your dogs from breeders, makes you a dog owner “FAIL” in my book. Any one who reads a few of your comments would consider you a dog owner “FAIL”. Being abused is not an “excuse”. I wonder how you would react to people if you had been abused constantly and repeatedly for an extended period of time. I wonder what type of psychological trauma you would suffer from. I wonder how long it would take YOU to trust again.

          • Karen

            Yes, I put my children’s safety and well-being above a dog, so sue me. I would never have risked one of them being hurt by an unstable dog. I’m quite proud of my well-bred, purebred dogs purchased from reputable breeders committed to improving the breed. When I’m ready for my next dog, I will also buy that one from a reputable breeder and not feel one tiny bit guilty about it. Buying a dog from a shelter is not the best option for everyone. Sometimes I recommend it for people and for others I discourage it and encourage them to find a reputable breeder. It all depends on their needs and experience. Regardless of if you buy your dog from a shelter or a breeder, what matters is that you KEEP it. Approximately a quarter of dogs purchased from a shelter are RETURNED at some point for issues, most that could be prevented or fixed if people didn’t have the mindset like yours.

            It doesn’t matter how long it would take me or any other human to trust again – dogs aren’t humans. We hurt them by anthropomorphizing them (which is why many end up in shelters – their humans screwed them up by not understanding they are dog.). MOST dog behavior and psychological issues come from this “humanizing” of dogs. It’s a shame more people can’t get past their own selfish needs to give the dogs what *they* actually need. If people can’t educate themselves on the basics of what dogs need, *that* is an owner fail. Purchasing a well-bred dog from a breeder, providing for its needs for exercise, leadership, structure, and mental stimulation, training said dog to a high degree, getting titles and therapy dog certification, and keeping the dog until is natural death is hardly a “fail”. What’s your dog done lately?
            http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/articles/humandog.htm
            http://www.fortunatek9.com/Articles/The_Abuse_Excuse_Julia_V_McDonough.pdf
            http://www.embracepetinsurance.com/hot-topics/history-of-abuse-no-excuse-for-pet-bad-behavior
            http://www.sdhumane.org/site/DocServer/BT_K9-Was_Your_Dog_Abused.pdf?docID=608

        • dmbouchard84

          That’s not true…some dogs are so severely abused and neglected that they don’t turn around…you need to learn some facts

          • Karen

            If you need to hang on to that excuse, go right ahead. Whatever makes you feel good. Of course the “abuse excuse” is one of the most popular! Just because *you* can’t do it, doesn’t mean there aren’t hundreds of trainers that can.
            http://www.fortunatek9.com/Articles/The_Abuse_Excuse_Julia_V_McDonough.pdf
            http://www.embracepetinsurance.com/hot-topics/history-of-abuse-no-excuse-for-pet-bad-behavior
            http://www.sdhumane.org/site/DocServer/BT_K9-Was_Your_Dog_Abused.pdf?docID=608

          • dmbouchard84

            You are a moron….you obviously have no clue..and I hope to God you don’t work with animals..just because *you* don’t have a clue doesn’t mean others can..you can write all the articles you want, but that doesn’t mean a thing…

          • Karen

            I do have animals and I’ve always had animals. And I’m confident that my dogs are a lot happier, relaxed, and more content, confident, mentally stable, and better behaved than yours ever will be. I don’t project my own neurosis onto them pretending they’re my little fur-babies, like a 6 year old playing house with dolls.

          • dmbouchard84

            Further more..I did not get my non-purebred dog through a breeder..and I would do it again and again…he IS my fur baby, what’s the point of having a dog if they aren’t going to be your baby…I feel so bad for your animals.

          • Karen

            I feel sorry for your animals because your selfish needs come before theirs. I don’t need to pretend my dog is a “baby” because I’ve had *real* babies and understand the difference. I don’t have the emotional maturity of a 5 year old! You aren’t some kind of special hero just because you bought a dog from a shelter. Get over yourself.

        • Joanne Lynn Olisky

          i dont know who you are or what worl you are lining in but i know for sure that pits are the nicest dogs i have ever met and i have had lost of pitbulls and i have 2 kids who are growing up around them!!!!!!

        • Dawn Robyn Bowen

          You have no idea what your talking about when it comes to ‘dogs and their ‘leader’..

        • MrEFQ

          You really have no clue what you are talking about.

        • Renee Reinhardt

          That is with time and learning, but not an immediate response. Abused people do not have that ability, so never force and animal to have it either. No one is “making excuses”, it’s a FACT! I have a heeler rescue and I KNOW!

        • Dania

          YOU KNOW NOTHING…

      • Guest

        so since there are people on here that seem to know about training and what not…i’m just curious but my dog is 8 years old now. she was recently in heat and i had touched her tail(before i realized it) and she growled at me. she snapped at me the second time when i went to show my boyfriend. she’s never done this before. then yesterday i was just petting her and she started growling, but it wasn’t in a baring the teeth type. like i said, she’s never done this before and i don’t know if it’s because she’s gotten older and is in heat now or not(that’s what my boyfriend is blaming it on but i don’t know.) has anyone ever dealt with something like that? it wouldn’t bother me but she is a pit mix and about 2 months ago my friends 2 pit bulls turned on her and killed her. they weren’t abused or neglected and that happened when she went to feed them. i don’t know if something happened with the female and the male reacted or what but now my dog is doing this and i dunno. she’s not abused, she’s a mostly inside dog because she’s refuses to stay outside long. sorry if it’s off topic but i’m just curious if anyone has any ideas for me. my bf wants to get rid of her if it keeps on but i’ve had her for 8 years, i’m not giving up my dog. sorry if it’s off topic…thanks for any help.

        • Karen

          I’m not sure I read that right – your friend was killed by her pit bulls and you have a pit bull showing signs of aggression but you aren’t willing to have the dog PTS? Do I have that right?

      • Lucas Longshanks

        Karen is definitely exaggerating quite a bit. It’s funny how some people will watch a couple episodes of the Dog Whisperer, and all the sudden they are an expert. I can somewhat understand her point to a certain degree, but there are many different ways to effectively train your dog. Every dog is different and some dogs will respond differently. One of my dogs is praise based and the other couldn’t give a crap if I pet her or not. I have to train them differently.

        BTW: I do love Pitties and I think they are great dogs but you can’t compare them to an aggressive Jack Russell. Having a larger breed requires extra responsibility and most owners need to realize it. That doesn’t include the fact that a large portion of Pit owners like them for their fighting qualities and get them because of that.

        The biggest liability of owning a Pitt Bull is b/c they don’t give a warning to other people or dogs that they are going to attack. This is why they are great fighting dogs. Dogs will usually put out a few feeler bites before going for the throat while Pitties will not. They are a lot more dangerous to other dogs than they are to humans in most scenarios. I will only get mutts from rescues, no pure breeds. Having mixed Pitties might help with some of their negative breed characteristics.

      • patcee14

        My little dog is afraid of little kids. I’m always scared they are going to run up to him. I am going to try the yellow ribbon, but I wish parents would understand they need to teach their kids – especially small ones – how to approach a dog. It is an important part of their education about the world.

    • Lynn B

      Mine is a rescue as well and she too becomes nervous when people come towards her I love this Idea and will tie a yellow ribbon to her leash tonight !!

    • waynefromnscanada

      Would be of value if people knew what it meant, otherwise it might even attract people to the dog, to pet the dog with the pretty yellow ribbon.

    • Vapemans

      that is not NERVES< it is PROTECTION Attitudes. Dogs know people far better than other People do…

      that is what DOGS NATURALLY DO, to ensure their Masters are SAFE!!!
      which is why she calms only AFTER you say its ok. Otherwise, if it were NERVES< she would still have them when the "STRANGERS" are around, whether you think its ok or not.

      • JJ1964

        Yes I agree. My girl seems to really know people. We have a neighbor that is on drugs and uses people and no one likes her much but my dog absolutely cannot stand her. We figured she knows what kind of a person she really is

    • Kell Ahlers

      Thank you for rescuing!

      • JJ1964

        It is us who are thankful. She is an awesome dog!

    • Renee Reinhardt

      That is normal for all dogs. No one should ever assume a dog must or should be accepting of strangers.

      • Dagummit

        I agree. While I think the yellow ribbon is a good idea, I do feel that no dog should just be approached. No matter what color ribbon or bandana a dog has on, owners should ALWAYS be asked before you approach a dog.

    • Dania

      It must be a balance, bt establishing dominance and teaching them it’s ok to be around others. They feel when one it’s unstable, unsecured or just mad and they act according to what the owner it’s letting on. But it’s a good idea when unsecured new fosters go into public places like the dog park, people just assumed all dogs want to be petted, but this dogs tend to act more like cats and only approach once they know they’re not gonna be harmed. My dog likes meeting dogs at the dog park and running and running and running, but there is no way she’ll approach other persons that she doesn’t know, thankfully she runs when someone tries to pet her, but not all dogs do that and will instead give a small bite/snarl to let the person know they are not comfortable with that. Usually those clueless people are the ones that bring the crazy pups that just go and jump on other dogs without smelling each other…. making mature dogs cranky and putting them on guard. ALSO PLEASE DON’T TAKE YOUR PETS TO THE DOG PARK UNLESS IT’S SPAYED OR NEUTERED, IT WILL STIR UP FIGHTS!!!!

      • JJ1964

        When our male dog was little we took him to a dog park (yes he was fixed) he had fun but he is a jumper, still is. so we decided he was better off running in the woods near our house. He is friendly with all dogs since we socialized him since 5 weeks old. The girl dog though, I would never take her to a dog park. Although we find most dogs she is friendly with we cannot take a chance because we didn’t raise her. We don’t know how she will react in all situations

        • Dania

          I get prevention of remediation its really helpful to spread this article around. (on another topic) Usually jumpers are really athletic or hyper, working dogs that want to please humans, personally for me it’s worked to turn and ignore their presence until they sit (or calmed down) I bet that if you took him for a run first before the park (and at early hours) he would do great, bc he would notice how other dogs are behaving instead of being super exited by so many cool things to do and smell around. For the girl, it shouldn’t just be about dog parks, but helping her feel more secure about herself even in presence of multiple dogs (or humans) bc this will have tons of positive effects on her health, and don’t just rely on her upbringing they live on the now and here (they might have some triggers but you’ll notice them when you look at her body language) bc that small moment of doubt it’s all it take for them to feel insecure , I do struggle with this when rehabilitating abused or aggressive dogs daily, and I get angry and frustrated at that moment but I try to think back to the day I got that animal and start a list of all the obstacles they have overcomed since then, and go over them whenever I might start feel unsure about a certain situation that might have ended differently a year ago. I thought it was stupid, but it does help me keep focused on their exposure to new things. I see it as a race with obstacles, just bc people stumble doesn’t mean they shouldn’t run ^_^ one thing new you do with her once a month will become lots in years to come. Old dogs learn the hardest tricks in my experience

      • Dania

        I really do believe it, majority of attacks in news are committed bc of the presence of intact animals. I’m not saying you can’t have decent dog with balls, an I’m happy to vouch for your dogs, but @Dagummit:disqus you must look at the canine behavior and physiology as a general view, a hormonal animal can become a loose cannon in seconds, that’s fact. And I wish that all the people who bring their intact pets could be like you, that understand their pets clues and knows how to bring the best of them out, but sadly most people don’t. Just swing by the dog park to analyze the humans first …. and then observe the behavior of their dogs and patterns will start to emerge, yes lack of respect for their humans stands out but the other will be intact animals. Bc I don’t know who’s gonna walk through the fence I rather prevent than having to deal with consequences. And that is without health hazards that remaining intact will bring to pets in the future and the shortened life span it brings.

  • Laura Phillips

    hope this catches on, my dog is very timid and doesn’t like to be touched by people he doesn’t know well. I will be using the the yellow ribbon from now on.
    .

  • Mea’eshana PhoenixFire

    Personally I prefer these: http://www.friendlydogcollars.com.au/ – a little bit more pricey, maybe, but for a dog that needs a little bit of understanding, they’re much more informational to the general public.

    • http://www.Makana-Mai-Akua-Inc.com/ Debi

      Now this is something helpful. Thank you for posting about these. They offer a solution that is more readily understood for now :)

    • Angela

      These ARE great! There are also others available, a little more reasonable and made in the US, on http://www.hotdogcollars.com.

  • Cyn McCollum

    It means you won’t bother to train your dog properly, for what ever excuse you want to use. Period.

    • Carlie Lamiroy

      Absolutely not so. It could mean that the dog is in the process of being trained, for instance – training doesn’t happen overnight! It could mean the dog is recovering from illness or surgery; a dog who just had TPLO surgery for instance may be sore and not up for interactions with another dog or a rambunctious child. It could mean the dog has been profoundly scarred by a previous experience; I knew a dog who was tortured by a group of children (lost an eye over it). Super sweet dog, but being around children made her incredibly anxious. Or it could mean that the dog is just shy; shyness has a genetic component, and for some dogs all of the training in the world will never make them comfortable with strange people or dogs.
      Your response shows a profound lack of understanding about canine behavior, health, and training.

      • Karen

        A dog like this should be muzzled in public.

        • Emily Bernstein

          Umm..not so much. It might not be a dog that will attack or hurt anyone, just will be very scared if approached by strangers

        • Carlie Lamiroy

          A muzzle might keep the dog from biting someone, but it does nothing about the anxiety caused to the dog by these situations. Plus if you have a dog in training the muzzle makes rewarding the dog for good behavior extremely difficult.

          • Karen

            I assume by rewarding you mean shoving food in its mouth? You realize this is a fairly new obsession and prior to it, thousands of dogs were trained to be well-mannered, stable, and reliable without cookies? I’m working with an extremely anxious and fearful foster dog. She’s come a long way and hasn’t had a single treat yet.

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            I feel sorry for the dog you’re “working with”. “Shoving food into a dogs mouth” said nobody ever. I’ve never met a dog who was forced to eat treats!! They obviously want them. After all don’t they deserve it for putting up with all the crap we require them to do!! Karen you sound like a Debbie. Stop being such an Oscar the grouch

          • Karen

            Really? You “feel sorry” for the dog I’m working with? So, I guess you think she’s better off living in the kennel where she’s lived more than half her life (two years, maybe more), not getting walked (because no one *could*), not getting to play with other dogs (because she couldn’t), with a warning sign on her kennel door? That’s preferable to going for an hour structured walk each morning, sleeping on a cushy bed in a quiet room, having a buddy to play with, going hiking, going to the beach, walking downtown, having new experiences to face each day, having a chew bone, having toys? You “feel sorry” for her? Because da widdle sweet thang doesn’t get cookie-wookies? Should I just go ahead and return her to the kennel instead of working towards getting her a permanent home.

            Do you also “feel sorry” for my dog? My dog who has 5 titles, a CGC, was certified by TDI, has been to 6 countries? My dog who goes many places such as hiking, to the beach, fields, even downtown without a leash? My dog who has flown on airplanes, ridden trains, been on sailboats, on jetskis, trams, subways, even paddleboarding (he’s not even 3 yet). My dog who goes to the office with me, goes shopping with me, gets to meet and play with tons of kids, is welcome where most dogs aren’t, and gets a ton of attention because he’s so well-behaved? Do you feel sorry for him to? What about your dog? He gets cookies?

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            You sound like a crazy lady. Calm down and give yourself a cookie too

          • carol snyder

            it must be rough on you being so perfect. Take a chill pill for Gods sake. Not all dogs react to the same type of training. Just like people different things work for different types. I have Chi’s of my own and foster others also.. They all react in different ways and some are extremely difficult to train and some are so easy.

          • Reader J

            Karen, I was actually enjoying reading your posts. That was until all the childish name calling started. I assumed we are all adults, so why are you behaving like a school kid? It really is pathetic and any ounce of respect I had for you, is GONE. You are a joke. Elizabeth is right, you are crazy. Your ways are not the only ways you know. It’s sad that some people think their way is the only way. You know, I’ve had friends who have been long time trainers have equally great success that you have had, in just as short a time. These animals are now well socialised, they too go inside the stores (even where dogs are banned because these are ‘special’ dogs, bit like yours really), they go hiking and even jet skiing. They particularly like hiking in NZ. They are really bad at sending post cards though. Ingrates they are. They have a better life than most people. My friends have had their great success by beating them into submission. That worked a treat, you should try it!

          • http://crazyoconnors.blogspot.com AmyOConnor

            So, you chastise Karen for name calling then turn to a smart-ass yourself? Mature, I tell you. Actually, check out Elizabeth’s other enlightening posts. She seems like a gem. Oh, so eloquent. I have to say that if I were being attacked as Karen has been, I would eventually lash out as well. Talk about “grow up”! The majority of responders to Karen’s comments need to grow up. Nothing but rudeness and unintelligible twattle.

          • Carlie Lamiroy

            This “fairly new obsession” is backed by science and the preferred method for Applied Animal Behaviorists (a title that, in order to earn, requires a master’s degree in animal science with an emphasis on behavior, plus professional experience working in a field using applied animal behavior, and more – there are only a handful of people with the title in the entire world). It is the method used by animal trainers working with marine mammals as well as elephants, tigers, bears, etc. And it is recommended by the Association of Pet Dog Trainers as well as the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior.
            Rewarding a dog is not necessarily “shoving cookies into his mouth.” It can be whatever motivates him, whether that’s attention/affection, a few minutes of playing with a ball, or, yes, a particularly yummy treat (or, as with one of my dogs, even just pieces of kibble, as she is highly food motivated). Many of those rewards would be difficult to administer around a muzzle. A savvy trainer will also use real world rewards such as rewarding a dog for sitting at the door by going out for a walk. And just because you use rewards to reinforce your desired behavior does not mean that you don’t also provide your dog structure, abundant exercise, and clear boundaries, as well as clear, confident, and consistent communication both verbally and through your body language.

          • Karen

            Watch Blackfish – even the whales won’t continue to perform if they miss a fish or two. If I’m ever training whales, I’ll certainly get up to speed on that. But as for dogs, I see no reason to reinvent the wheel. And where did I ever say anything about not rewarding the dogs?

          • sweetone100percent

            I’m sure she hasn’t. After all, she has such a strong, arrogant, annoying trainer like you, that apparently, knows little concerning training ANY dog. Because if you had, all the comments you’ve made above would never have been said. You, clearly, do not know anything about training animals. That is so evident, it’s pathetic.

          • Dogmamma

            Karen, have you ever tried to muzzle a short snouted dog, like a pug or english bulldog? Doesn’t work. The Yellow Dog Project is a world-wide movement. I’ve known about in here in NC for about 2 years now. My dogs have completed Advanced Obedience Training and have their Canine Good Citizenship. I have a yellow ribbon for one of mine because he doesn’t like other dogs in his face or unsupervised children running up to him. He gets scared and that is not a safe situation for anyone. I continue to expose him to situations so that he will learn. I just wish parents would teach their kids how to approach any dog.

          • Karen
          • Dogmamma

            Tried those and they don’t work for my boy. My trainer even measured him.

          • Carol

            The neon colored leashes and harness that have the word caution embroidered on them might be a better option.

          • Carol

            I think a muzzle may be more of a deterrent to unwanted attention than a yellow ribbon.
            I understand what the yellow ribbon is trying to do I just don’t think it’s going to work. I think a campaign to educate people to the old “never touch/approach a strange dog without permission” would be a better use of time.

        • Carlie Lamiroy

          Plus, why would you muzzle an otherwise friendly dog who, for instance, is recovering from illness or surgery?

          • Laura A Good

            then why have them out with kids

        • sweetone100percent

          Karen, I’m beginning to think you need to be muzzled in public.

      • Cyn McCollum

        No Carlie, I have made my living as a dog trainer for 30 years now and I’m frankly appalled by the apologists who call themselves trainers, and the owners who believe them. It’s the handler’s responsibility to survey the surroundings, be sure the dog is defended from idiots who think every dog is their toy and be sure the dog is trained well enough to handle the situation in which the handler is working. Anxiety, shyness, etc. are all emotional states that benefit from training. Ask an expert, like say, ME! Or any of my network of decent trainers. Can’t handle an anxious dog? Get a trainer who can. Can’t give a shy dog confidence? Get a trainer who can. You are an apologist. Stop reading that stuff, it’s just an excuse to not get the job done.

        • Carlie Lamiroy

          I work professionally in an animal shelter, thanks, I actually know what I’m talking about. There are dozens of reasons why a dog might not want to be approached by another dog or children, none of which have to do with lack of training or even with the dog being aggressive. Putting a yellow ribbon on your dog does not mean that as that dog’s handler you cease to be paying attention and looking out for your dog’s best interest, it just gives someone approaching you the opportunity to be considerate.

          • Carlie Lamiroy

            P.S. In my experience, I’ve met plenty of “professional” dog trainers
            who have been making their living at it for decades who have dangerously little understanding about the real science behind canine behavior (because they haven’t bothered to keep up with it) and even less understanding about canine health. Not saying that you’re one of them, but forgive me if I take your “credentials” with a grain of salt.

          • Cyn McCollum

            Goddess save us all from shelter workers, especially the animals.

          • Carlie Lamiroy

            And save us all from arrogant, condescending dog trainers who think they don’t have an obligation to keep up with the latest science. The director of my shelter’s behavior modification program (and consequently, the woman who trained me) is an Associate Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist. When you can boast that level of education, experience, and effort, then maybe I’ll take you seriously.

          • Cyn McCollum

            You said science! I win.

          • Carlie Lamiroy

            I think it’s funny that you refer to positive training methods as “junk” science when in fact dominance theory (all the rage thirty years ago when you apparently got your start!) has been completely discredited by the scientific community.

          • Crystal

            That’s a bit harsh. What do you propose to do without all the people who volunteer to take care of the animals people have abandoned or allowed to reproduce out of control?

          • Cyn McCollum

            No, I propose the get better training in the real world, train the dogs who are with them effectively and stop making the poor abandoned abuse excuse.

          • Crystal

            You missed my point — that your snark was unnecessary and a personal attack against an entire group of very necessary people.

          • Cyn McCollum

            And you missed mine – this was not a problem 25 years ago before the unicorn huggers started using junk ‘science’ to justify not training, and hiring people who could not do the job.

          • Crystal

            You made a highly generalized attack that said absolutely nothing about that, and instead attacked animal shelter workers, both paid professionals and volunteers. Hence, “a bit harsh”.

    • Mary

      Oh bull. It means you’re trying to alert people that your dog might have a behavioral issue. Not all dogs are perfect on their first day of training, and some have behavioral issues throughout their lives, depending on what their breeding, past, and other factors have been.

      Seems to me someone who’s aware and responsible enough to use this technique is probably already working on training their dog, and working to keep him/her safe in the mean time.

      • Cyn McCollum

        Get a trainer who can actually fix the dog or do not take it in public with that ridiculous little admission of liability.

        • sweetone100percent

          People don’t FIX dogs, they aren’t broken! Just like you don’t FIX people, you don’t FIX dogs. You understand them, you work with them, and you love them. By doing so, you will have an amazing dog that will protect, defend when told, and be loving. When you socialize an animal, it’s important to bring them out into the public realm. Without doing so, you can’t socialize them. Putting on a muzzle, isn’t the answer, either. A trainer that knows nothing about dogs uses them with those that are fearful. A real trainer knows better.

          • Reader J

            People get fixed all the time. In fact, yesterday we ‘fixed’ several broken arms at work.

          • Elizabeth Maguire

            It’s still broken today so you didn’t fix it

    • Karen

      I have one right now that is dog aggressive (fear). She’s been in a shelter for two years because of it (and human aggression as well). I’m fostering her and training her and she’s made an amazing turn-around in only a couple of weeks, however, she still can’t be trusted around strange dogs. BUT I will not have her out around other dogs WITHOUT A MUZZLE! To have a dog that can’t be trusted not to bite out in public without a muzzle is the height of irresponsibility!

  • mntryjoseph

    I did know about this, but the article shows the yellow ribbon on the leash [infographic] in some photos & on the collar on other photos. Is either place okay?

    • Carlie Lamiroy

      I think the leash is actually better because it’s easier to see.

  • Susan Strader

    Very informative- I will share this with other dog owners.

  • HarveMorgan

    I do hope you realize that if something happens and a dog has that ribbon on it, you will be sued. The court will say that you were aware of what the dog would do (ribbon) and you will loss your case. One case in court where a sign was posted “Beware of Dog” was ruled by the court as an admission of knowing you have a ‘dangerous’ dog. The court stated that an appropriate sign would be “Enter at Own Risk, Dog on Premise”. I suggest you check with an attorney about how this can affect you if the dog does do something. Besides it is a stupid idea anyway considering the public has no idea about these ribbons. We can’t even get them to spay/neuter with all the education out there.

    • Karen

      The responsible owner will have such a dog muzzled in public.

      • sweetone100percent

        The responsible owner joins the yellow ribbon program and learns, unlike the know it all, above that doesn’t speak factually.

    • PAZO2FAN

      In my agriculture management class in high school we were taught that by law if you had a trespasser came on your property, you’re dog bit them and you didn’t have a beware of dog sign, previously posted. They are allowed to sue you.

      • Elizabeth Maguire

        This makes sense!! I think really it doesn’t matter though. If you live in the states you can sue anyone for anything anytime!! Lol

    • Angela

      The case you mention is NOT typical. Actually it’s to the contrary. Having any notice on your property puts trespassers “on notice” and negates liability to the property owner.

      Of course, anyone seeking personal legal advise on this subject should retain and consult a licensed attorney in their state.

  • Karen

    Forget the yellow ribbon! If you can’t trust your dog not to bite, PUT A MUZZLE ON IT! To have a dog that bites out in public without a muzzle is the height of irresponsibility!

    • Carlie Lamiroy

      Dogs wearing the yellow ribbon aren’t necessarily dogs that are likely to bite. I have a dog who wears a yellow ribbon because he isn’t wild about other dogs or strangers; I have 100% cofidence that he would never, ever bite someone except under truly extreme circumstances, but he would rather not say hi. The ribbon is to let people know that.
      For another example, my other dog was recently treated for heartworm disease. Her activity was extremely restricted for two months. Saying hi was just too exciting for her, so even tho she’s just aboutthefrfriendliest dog you’ll ever meet, she, too wore the ribbon.

      • Karen

        Well we shouldn’t need a damn ribbon for that! It’s incredibly rude to allow your dog to approach other dogs on the sidewalk anyway. I don’t allow my dog to “say hello” (WTF?) and tell people flat out, keep your under control and away from mine. My dog doesn’t know a stranger, canine or human, but it’s just rude and poor “dogmanship” to think your dog has to greet every dog it sees.

        • Carlie Lamiroy

          Very true, yet it happens ALL THE TIME.

          • Carlie Lamiroy

            And the same with kids. I can’t tell you how often I get little kids who run screaming up to my dogs to give them hugs and kisses. luckily even my dog who isn’t wild about strangers does really like kids so it’s no big deal for us, but there are plenty of otherwise perfectly nice dogs that don’t like that.

          • Karen

            If someone is paying attention to the task at hand, walking their dog, I don’t see how any child or animal can get to your dog before you notice and tell them no. I can very quickly and quietly get between my dog and someone else and tell them “no”. I do it all the time with morons with their dogs on damned harness and Flexis (I already know when I see them coming with that that they are clueless) who think their little “fur baby” just has to “say hello”. I then get, “can’t they say hi?” “NO!”. I’m always prepared when I see a dog in a harness and a Flexi – always, because I know there’s an idiot at the other end.

          • PAZO2FAN

            people don’t always listen to “No” nor do they like it when you correct their children or tell them no. My chihuahua can be shy and she gets afraid around loud people but she will stay calm and let people pet her if I’m holding her. I took her on a different route on our walk one day and passed a playground. A whole group of kids came charging up to her screaming. She got so scared she almost jumped in the traffic. I picked her up quickly and the kids started asking her to hold her. I told them no because she is shy and won’t let strangers hold her. One of the children then grabbed my dogs legs and started tugging them while telling me she would be gentle with her. I told her to get her hands off my dog and I was leaving but not before having the parents confront and yell at me for yelling at their child. I made that decision that day to never walk her by that playground again and I haven’t since. Besides dog owners being responsible with knowing how their dog acts and muzzling them if needed., People in general need to be responsible and use some common sense when approaching ANY dog friendly or not.

          • Carlie Lamiroy

            The yellow ribbon does not mean that you get to stop being vigilant, especially because people are dumb. I hate those stupid flexi-leashes too, for the same reason you do – people just don’t pay attention. They let their dog come running up to people and other dogs and yell “don’t worry, he’s friendly!” with no thought as to whether the person in question might be scared of dogs, or whether the dog in question is friendly with other dogs. I get the same problem all the time with off-leash dogs, too. I even get people who bring dogs into the animal shelter I work at who aren’t on a leash “because he’s friendly”!

            The point is that the yellow ribbon allows another, conscientious dog owner to see from a distance that your dog does not wish to be approached, and allows them to reign their dog in, and maybe even take a route around your dog or cross the street to give your dog the space he needs.

  • Emily Bernstein

    Just commenting to everyone that is talking about muzzles – a yellow ribbon doesn’t neccesarily mean that the dog will attack. It means that it shouldn’t be suddenly approached. I have had two dogs like that, both rescues that had been abused. One would bite (and we keep a head collard on her), the current one doesn’t bite, she’s just very scared when suddenly approached by new people. I suppose if someone suddenly grabbed for her, she might bite, but its never happened. If we did put a yellow ribbon on her it would be to stop her from being traumatized (and no, we don’t take her lots of places).

    For me, the important thing is for parents to teach children to be cautious with animals. When I was a child, my parents taught me to ask the owner before approaching an animal. It takes a half second and keeps everyone safe. Everyone should be taught that!

    • Karen

      If you don’t take her lots of places, how do you expect her to get over her fears? I still don’t understand the need for a yellow ribbon. Just use your mouth and tell people to keep out of your space. Strange dogs should never be allowed to greet other dogs in public without expressed interest and permission to do so. I can guarantee if you walk out of your house right now and ask 20 people what a yellow ribbon means, no one will know. Just tell people to not approach. I take my fearful foster out to all kinds of new places and when people ask if they can pet her, I say “no”. It’s that simple. Actually, I can now allow people I feel can act normal (and not like a 6 year old squeaky baby talk and doing erratic movements – encounter adults like that all the time) to pet her and she’s fine. But you can’t keep them at home and just hope their fear goes away; but in the meantime, you have to keep others safe.

      • Emily Bernstein

        I don’t yellow ribbon her. I was just saying thats why some people might. And what I meant by I don’t take her lots of places is that we are slowly working on different situations and exposure – didn’t want to get the inevitable yell from someone about taking her lots of places if it was going to scare her.

      • http://www.Makana-Mai-Akua-Inc.com/ Debi

        Karen I hate to tell you but “Just use your mouth and tell people to keep out of your space.” is not a solution. I have a fear-aggressive dog who is adorable… hence everyone wants to pet him. You’d be amazed at how many times, even after being told (3,4 or more times as they advance) not to touch him, that he will bite, people still insist on coming closer and trying to pet him! Obviously not many people are yet familiar with the yellow ribbons either, but give credit for what they’re trying to do.

        And, incidentally, choke chains/pinch collars and reputable, professional “balanced method” trainers aren’t the solution for a fear-aggressive dogs either.

        You admitted you’re not even a certified trainer and, honestly, your negative, condescending, smart-ass attitude isn’t adding anything useful to the conversation here.

        • Karen

          If you’ve had your dog more than a couple months and he’s still “fear aggressive”, clearly your method is not working. Thousands of fear aggressive dogs have been successfully rehabilitated with balanced training methods. I’m not a “certified” trainer. Nor am I a “professional” (which doesn’t need “certification”) – but this guy is.
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8WEi9BfTIc

          • http://www.Makana-Mai-Akua-Inc.com/ Debi

            I call BS on this video, though it doesn’t matter… a nervous dog is not the same as a fear-aggressive dog. I spent thousands having a Certified Master K-9 Trainer work with my dog… with a pinch collar and all his other methods because he’s my first dog and I didn’t know better. Then I was stupid enough to trust him to take him because “on-site” training was “needed” at their facility.

            Well, he came home WORSE (and come to find out was abused in their care – along with multiple other dogs). So then I got to spend thousands upon thousands more dollars and a lifetime of hours working with him and trainers (always with me present after that thank you very much) to try to undo the damage.

            For anyone dealing with dominance and/or fear aggression, look up Nicholas Dodman. I have him to thank for not having to put my dog down when K-9 University got done with him. Better yet, I’ll make it easy for you… http://www.tufts.edu/vet/behavior/staff.shtml :) If you’re not lucky enough to be within distance to see him in person, you can still learn from his books, etc.

            No matter what problems you may have with a dog, PLEASE be careful who you select to work with you and the dog and talk to former clients whenever possible!

          • http://www.Makana-Mai-Akua-Inc.com/ Debi

            I call BS on this video, though it doesn’t matter… a nervous dog is not the same as a fear-aggressive dog. I spent thousands having a Certified Master K-9 Trainer work with my dog… with a pinch collar and all his other methods because he’s my first dog and I didn’t know better. Then I was stupid enough to trust him to take him because “on-site” training was “needed” at their facility.

            Well, he came home WORSE (and come to find out was abused in their care – along with multiple other dogs). So then I got to spend thousands upon thousands more dollars and a lifetime of hours working with him and trainers (always with me present after that thank you very much) to try to undo the damage.

            For anyone dealing with dominance and/or fear aggression, look up Nicholas Dodman. I have him to thank for not having to put my dog down when K-9 University got done with him. Better yet, I’ll make it easy for you… http://www.tufts .edu/ vet/behavior/staff .shtml – just remove the spaces:) If you’re not lucky enough to be within driving distance to see him in person, you can still learn from his books, etc.

            No matter what problems you may have with a dog, PLEASE be careful who you select to work with you and the dog and talk to former clients whenever possible!

          • TheCatman TLG

            lol, your telling me this dog has NEVER been walked in this fashion and this is his very first day?? That is absolute nonsense, i can tell you just from the dogs behavior that not only is she nervous, but she has had previous training, and the way she watches his every move and follows in step and in correct position indicates she has had training with this person in particular. He has trained a nervous dog basic walk technique and position and then makes a video obviously showing that technique yet saying this is the first time shes ever done it?? Karen, is this your hubby??? Also Karen, if you havent noticed, people arent so much disagreeing with you as much as they are saying your a condescending bitch with a bad attitude, and if your attitude is so snarky to the common person, how possibly could you have the patience to deal with rescue pups? You wont respond to that for some reason tho, i think its a matter of arguing against fact

      • Angela

        Oh, I wish the world were that easy! Unfortunately, there are plenty of parents who do not watch their kids responsibly in public. One of my rescues is nervous as he was abandoned (no signs of abuse) for months. I take him out for socialization and constantly watch our surroundings to responsibly and correctly introduce him to strangers wanting to meet him. I will reach for something on a shelf, turn around, and two unmonitored kids are petting him without asking! You aren’t always given the opportunity to say “no”. I’m not saying the yellow ribbon is the answer, but I find many people are just not taught to ask to meet your dogs.

      • Ramona FuzzyBunny Ledwon

        Tell people!! I did that and what happened? The stupid man still came at my girl and she nipped at him. Big man said oh i trained pit bulls bla bla bla but did he listen to me when i told him no don’t touch my dog NO!!! Poor girl was shaking and hiding between my legs and the moron still didn’t take no for an answer. So people don’t always listen.

    • Valerie Silensky-Lowe

      Everyone should be taught that simply because it is respectful. Of the dog and of you the guardian. Don’t touch what isn’t yours – I thought that was the cardinal rule that parents teach their kids? (Not a parent to any people-puppies so maybe they don’t…)

      • http://www.Makana-Mai-Akua-Inc.com/ Debi

        It’s incredible how many DON’T nowadays and just let their kids run up to strange dogs… even when the owner is telling them no!

      • Dagummit

        They don’t teach it anymore. It’s awful. My dogs are ok with people running up to them but it’s not even just kids that do it. I’ve had grown adults run up to my dogs and drop to their knees in front of them and start trying to kiss on their faces. Of course, I always step back with my dogs so as not to put them in that position. Then the people who ran up to a strange dog have the nerve to get offended when I tell them that I do not allow people to approach my dogs in that manner.

  • Michael Mayo

    When I was a child, my first words were, may I pet your dog and does he/she bite? I didn’t run up and start petting the dog. But I see a major problem with this and here’s why. People will tie a yellow ribbon around the dog and expect people to know it’s dangerous. I’ve never heard of this yellow ribbon thing and I’m sure most other people haven’t either. So should a court case crop up over this, the defense of the dog owner will be “but I had a yellow ribbon on the leash, the children should have known my dog was dangerous.” On the flip side if a dog didn’t have a yellow ribbon does that mean it’s safe to go up and pet? So rather than create a false sense of security and confusion, don’t put the yellow ribbon on the leash and use a friendly verbal warning instead.

    • April Ciolek

      But it’s a start.

      • Karen

        The same efforts put into “yellow ribbon awareness” could be put into basic “dog etiquette”, such as reminding people that strange dogs shouldn’t be allowed to greet on the walk, or that you shouldn’t approach strange dogs unless invited to do so.

        • Sab W.

          Yeah this drives me nuts. Before she came to my family, my dog was abused (used as a bait dog) for four years and it absolutely kills me when people with small children SEE me with my dog and my yellow ribbon and say nothing as their kids charge towards me and my dog. That’s to say nothing of the folks who do not leash or sometimes even COLLAR their dogs in public areas!! Any dog could exhibit aggression (or wanderlust, or a desperate urge to cross a busy street) at any time.

          • Dagummit

            You have to understand that most people don’t care or think they are the exception to the rule. People will often think they are special snowflakes and they know that your dog won’t be afraid of them because, well, they’re special. When my Standard Xolo was younger he had a completely ADD puppy brain and, while he was never aggressive, his issue was that his goldfish brain was very easily distracted.

            Being a large, hairless dog, EVERYONE wants to touch him. He’s a head turner and people will make noises or talk to him more than they do with my Smooth Collie and Bluetick Coonhound combined (also both almost unheard of breeds where we live). I was constantly telling people” Please don’t distract/touch him. He’s very young and we’re working on training right now” but people ignored me CONSTANTLY. I finally bought him a vest with big, easily seen patches on it that said “PLEASE DO NOT DISTRACT ME. I’M TRYING TO LEARN” on it. Keep in mind that vests are perfectly legal for any dog as long as they do not have service dog patches on it and the owner does not try to pass off the dog as a service dog. Even with a patch on his back that said those things, I STILL had people approach him and tell me “It’s ok. I have dogs” or “It’s ok. I’m a dog trainer”.

            Service dog handlers I know are always being approached by people who insist they need to pet the dog or don’t bother asking and many of these dogs always have vests on in public with “SERVICE DOG” on them in big red letters.

            People often just don’t care. It’s ridiculous and downright rude but there will ALWAYS be people who ignore yellow ribbons, verbal explanations, bold vests, etc. There is just no excuse for it but all we can do is continue to educate.

        • Carlie Lamiroy

          The two aren’t mutually exclusive. Just because people are raising awareness about this idea doesn’t mean that people also shouldn’t be talking about dog etiquette. And just because you put a yellow ribbon on your dog’s leash doesn’t mean you should cease being aware of your surroundings, and tell people who don’t heed the warning of the yellow ribbon to back off.

        • Dianne Shaw

          Zip it Karen! Good grief! You are not the encyclopedic expert on the subject of dogs. You don’t have to contribute your two cents every time someone says something. You must not have had enough attention as a child.

          • Karen

            Screw off Dianne!

          • Heather

            I think Karen needs a yellow ribbon.

          • TheCatman TLG

            i too would like you to kindly stfu, tho ive not the care to be as nice as dianne about it

        • Ramona FuzzyBunny Ledwon

          HAHA!! That’s funny considering that people with poor etiquette cannot be “taught” anything. I have a fully fenced in back yard and I still have stupid idiots coming to my fence and sticking their kids arms through the fence. I’m not putting beware of dog signs because they will only doing what’s in their nature PROTECT! You can come into my home and they will lick you to death. So how can you teach anyone walking around not to touch or approach without permission. So please really think about you say before posting.

    • Carlie Lamiroy

      Often a verbal warning just isn’t fast enough. In my experience people who are aware enough of their dog’s behavior to use the ribbon are no less vigilant, but it’s a nice, clear visual cue that can then be followed up with a verbal warning if necessary. As far as not having heard of it, it’s a relatively new movement. Give it time. It’s good manners as a parent or dog owner to ask permission before your dog/kid says hello, and this shouldn’t change that.

    • carol snyder

      one of the most sensible posts I’ve seen on here. I teach my kids never to go up to a strange dog and I don’t either. I worked as a dog warden and found that most people have no clue what their animal will do just like most people have no clue what their kids are capable of doing.

  • Ronald W. Browne

    BLUE BUFFALO ALL NATURAL PET FOOD, THE VERY BEST . NEW PLANT BEING PUT TOGETHER IN JOPLIN MO. THEY WILL NEED GOOD HELPERS,

  • Jennifer Williams

    I never heard of this and I imagine a lot of other people haven’t either. I think if you are aware of your dog being dangerous you should probably put your dog into a muzzle if there will be a lot of people around and an accident could occur. Why risk it? If everyone knew what the yellow ribbon was for it would be different, but if you think about it, most kids are going to think it is there to be pretty.

    • Carlie Lamiroy

      Most yellow ribbon dogs aren’t necessarily aggressive dogs that are going to go out of their way to attack someone. They’re just dogs that don’t necessarily appreciate having a strange child rush up to it to give it hugs and kisses, or having a strange dog rush up to it to say hello. They’re nervous, or old and grumpy, or recovering from painful surgery, etc. And the whole point of the yellow ribbon project is to raise awareness about it; it’s a brand new thing, so of course a lot of people haven’t heard about it yet.

    • H_D_Thoreau

      Here’s my only question Jennifer, why do I have to be responsible for your kids actions? Meaning, my dog is fine when he is left alone, why does he have to be punished because someone can’t control their kids? Do you understand the point i’m trying to make. This yellow ribbon is an easy thing for parents to tell their kids. “Hey Johnny, if you see a yellow ribbon on a dog don’t run up to it because it will bite you.” Now, I personally think you should teach Johnny not to touch ANY dog unless you have permission from the owner, but that is really asking too much for some kids. I think we should leash our children because of this, but it doesn’t get a lot of support in the community.

      • Carol

        So rather than run a campaign to “teach” people not to touch strange dogs without asking and to ask dog owners to be responsible for their pets and offer tips on how to handle situations… a program has been introduced to wear a ribbon. 1. I think that if people ignore the “don’t touch a strange dog” rule they are not going to follow this new program 2. I think this program inadvertently will teach children that all dogs without a ribbon are safe to approach.
        I think the sensible thing would be to just push the older program of “never touch/approach a dog you do not know without the owners permission”.

  • Laura A Good

    i dont think dogs should be in a park for kids if they cant handle being around them its a risk in safety

    • Carlie Lamiroy

      What if you’re at the park and the dog walks down the sidewalk bordering the park? Should that dog not be allowed to use that public space? Most “yellow ribbon” dogs aren’t aggressive animals that are going to go out of their way to attack someone, they’re just dogs that don’t appreciate having a little kid (or, for that matter, another dog) rush up to it to say hi/give it hugs and kisses.

      • Laura A Good

        if the dog is at risk of harming someone or something no they should not be aloud in public places! I was stating that if the dog cant handle being around kids or other animals then they shouldn’t be in a park and i don’t think the Yellow ribbon idea is good because how is that to help a color blind person or a disabled person

        • Becki

          If you read the article in its entirety…… ” The dog may not be child friendly, may have fear or anxiety issues, or may be overly excited. Either way, caution should be applied when approaching. ” THIS DOES NOT MEAN AGGRESSIVE or NOT human friendly.

          • Laura A Good

            and if you where reading what i wrote in the entire you would see that i said IF THE DOG CANT HANDLE BEING AROUND KIDS OR OTHER DOGS SHOULD NOT BE TAKEN TO THE PARK! i love dogs dont get me wrong and yes they should be out running around but if you have that thought that your dog might hurt someone then why would you want to take them to a place full of people.

    • Michelle Stamper

      I agree, dogs are treated better than children. People will spend thousands of dollars on an animal and never think twice about children in orphanages. I don’t get around dogs I am not familiar with, nor do I allow my children too. A yellow ribbon is an excuse to have a dog in public areas that may pose a threat if approached. I think parks should have breed restrictions, sidewalks etc. Why should I have to use precaution in a public place because of a flea ridden dog thats mentally warped? Keep your mentally stressed out, and aggressive dogs in the their own back yard , why drag them out into parks and have to fear they may have a melt down? I want a yellow ribbon to wear- to send the message to ” People ” keep your distance, I might say something you will not like, or I might become anxious and piss myself..lol

      • Becki

        Because that is a persons prerogative. Why do YOU care how someone chooses to spend their time or their hard-earned money on? Some people are not children people and would rather spend their time with animals- Good for them for realizing it and not bringing MORE unwanted children into this already disgusting world. As for breed restrictions, what a joke! What we should do is pass out I.Q. tests for people who want to have CHILDREN before we start breed restrictions for dogs….there are quite a few people on here especially that should not procreate.

        • H_D_Thoreau

          I’m completely amazed at the lack of support and down right “anti” yellow ribbon. People without dogs seem to think a dog that may “snap” at someone is some how mentally disturbed. Not a single person would like it if i ran up to them screaming and started touching them, or talking with a baby voice and started rubbing their head. Why do they think my dog would like it? I don’t think we would need a yellow ribbon if adults and children would just leave my dog alone. Just because he is sitting next to you nicely in the park doesn’t mean you need to touch him.

  • Melanie Zarth

    I’m not even a dog owner…but why are people on here so negative? So some thoughtful people are trying to start a positive new movement. The only way it is going to become common knowledge is if we try to spread the word. I don’t think people are going to stop training their dogs or talking to upcoming strangers about the behavioral issues concerning the dog in question. There are a lot of points between extremely tolerant/docile and attack dog.

  • Damien Share

    Yellow ribbons have been a sign of welcome, friendship, waiting for the return of loved ones deployed and forgiveness for decades. I understand the spirit od what is being attempted for the dogs but they need to find a symbol that does not already have a time honored meaning and tradition

  • Dennis Broderick

    What if the dogs are fine and it turns out it’s me, can I tie one around my neck instead?

  • sweetone100percent

    Karen, you remind me of a pompous fool, not a dog trainer. Real dog trainers know that not every dog reacts the same, and you can’t compare a dog to a wolf, as dogs we have in our families are domesticated. Sad that people like you attempt to fool the public. I used to work with show dogs and police dogs. Your attitude would NEVER be acceptable. The yellow ribbon is a great program that allows people to know who to approach with caution. The abused animal tends to shy away from human touch, regardless of a strong handler. Should a child run up to that “cute little doggie” he/she could get bit out of sheer fear, and if you knew anything about dogs, whatsoever, you would know that. I’m surprised you put the links you did, up too. Had you really known anything about training, you would know that most are very outdated concepts. Might I suggest you actually get some real training for yourself. .

  • Dennis Broderick

    What if I turns out the problem is me, can I tie a ribbon around my neck instead?

  • Tina

    Never heard of this – great idea. **** HOWEVER **** YELLOW is a sign of Friendship, welcoming and kindness……… there should be a different color

    • TheCatman TLG

      yellow is the global sign for caution? what planet you from?

  • Mikster

    I suggest one of the more common symbols like the one used for poisons- skull and crossbones, perhaps. Dogs that present a true bite danger should probably be walked on owners premises anyway.

  • Jerico Sevenths Powers

    I guess it meens hes sick

  • Jessica Logan

    Rather then hoping and wishing that some dunce will know wtf a yellow ribbon means on the leash of your ill behaved dog and take the chance of it biting someone/something and being sued. Why don’t you be a responsible dog owner and behavior/obedience train your dog???
    I am always shocked that people will take a chance of having their dog do damage to someone/thing rather then correct the dog.

    • Karen

      Someone with common sense!

    • H_D_Thoreau

      Isn’t socialization behavior/obedience training? That doesn’t mean you should run at him full speed screaming and try and touch him (this happens all the time with kids). Are you behavior/obedience trained? Honestly how would you respond if I did that to you. You would start by stepping back cautiously then respond with anger. Dogs need socialization, they need to get out, it has been proven that it helps, what they don’t need is everyone touching and bothering them. If it takes a little yellow ribbon for people not to touch my dog while i’m out working with him, then i’ll put one on. I might wear one on my head too because I don’t liked being bothered either.

  • flowersforme123@gmail.com

    KAREN….You like to toot your own horn and seem to be tottering off your soap-box there…..why not see a dog in need and give it a loving home and security. Pet it and talk sweetly to it…make it feel safe and it will calm down and lie comfortably next to you. Speak kindly and be gentle with it and it will seek you out and want to please you. These rigid, ball breaking techniques are so barbaric….I cannot understand how you think any dog that has been misused, abused, neglected, would benefit from your technique. Perhaps if you used your time to better know the dog, took an interest in its feelings and insecurities, the same outcome of an obedient dog would be fruitful, instead of your whip and chain method. just sayin..oh…and hows your personal technique to get to know friends? I hope it is not the same as you use on those poor dogs…no wonder you have so much free time

    • Karen

      ~sniff~ Awwwww – that’s sooo sweeeeeeet! I’ll just go throw away these whips and chains right now!

  • Al Alborn

    Very bad idea. I assumed the yellow ribbon meant the dog’s owner was in the military serving overseas. It is the owner’s responsibility to warn other people, particularly children, if his or her dog has issues.

  • flowersforme123@gmail.com

    This is so juvenile. A simple question was asked about the significance of a yellow ribbon tied to a dogs leash. Now we are witnessing a “Mines bigger than yours” contest between two idiots with big swelled heads and no sense in them. When you have to brag that much and put other people down, it shows that you are suffering from a very low self esteem. So dont take it out on the dogs with your barbaric “training methods”. Go duke it out somewhere else and may the biggest muzzle win!

  • costume

    Yeah, don’t think putting a pretty ribbon on a leash is the right kind of way to warn others off. And if you have an aggressive dog, you shouldn’t be walking them around others, especially kids. I have a friend with a dog who has a history of jumping on people, including kids, and every time she blames the victim each time because they moved to fast or whatever. My fear is she and people like her will now claim that this ribbon clearly warned others to stay away when it actually won’t.

  • John Chuckles

    It should be a blood-soaked white handkerchief – no explanation necessary

  • http://www.tommyseilheimer.com/ Tommy Seilheimer

    We should do this process for members of congress too…

  • Cynthia D. Eliason

    If a yellow ribbon will make people mind their manners and respect others’ personal space, I’ll be wearing one every day, and maybe will get some for my dogs too.

  • Calendar Capenews

    Interesting. i wish I could have put a yellow ribbon on my kids when they were little to discourage strangers from getting too close to them with their germ infested hands etc. I have five year old twins who are still shy of strangers who approach them and want to chat and then can’t understand why they are hiding behind me. If it wards people away from dogs why not away from little kids as well…

  • Zac

    Wondering how Karen can even reach her dogs, let alone train them, sitting on that high horse.

  • Elizabeth Hood

    As the wife of a soldier and the owner of 4 dogs, one of whom needs a ribbon on his leash because he is an elderly dachshund who is going blind and deaf and is therefore nippy if startled by strangers, I’m very disappointed to see a yellow ribbon being used instead of a red ribbon. Red denotes caution should be taken (red alert, red light, red stop signs, code red, etc). Yellow ribbons should be reserved for soldiers and send a positive message, not cause people to think of aggressive dogs. Use a red ribbon instead!!!

  • Echo Moon

    does anybody know if this is real? i just talked to 4 friends who do rescue, animal transportation and training and none of them have heard a word about it nor seen it posted on facebook before….

  • Pam Lindsey Carlsen

    one of my favorite songs “tie a yellow ribbon around the ole oak tree” Tony orlando and Dawn I believe where the singers of that one. Now I too have dated myself, but that is okay

  • nursejeff

    What adult, let alone child would know this? It is your responsibility to control your animal at ALL times, not others to avoid you. Are you kidding me? This is supposed to be a reasonable warning that you have a dangerous animal, that you cannot control, out in public. Here is a better recommendation; unless your animal is safe around others, than keep them away from the public. Very inconsiderate of others. Let me know how that ribbon holds up in court.

    • dubfun

      As the article states, it is the Yellow Ribbon PROJECT. That means it is work in progress and they are trying raise awareness. I also did not know what it meant, and yes, many kids and adults currently don’t know what it means, but now you and I both know which proves that they are successfully reaching out to people. This is a good idea and hopefully it will help humans and dogs avoid future, stressful situations.

      • Abigail Drew Patridge

        Except nursejeff doesn’t, clearly, get it. Actually… Someone else responded indirectly explaining what it really means, which isn’t at all that the dog is “dangerous”, more like “having a bad day”. You could think of it as doggy PMS if you like. Even then it’s not exactly accurate either… it’s a “caution” signifier, not a “warning” signifier. There IS a difference. The warning comes later.

  • Holly

    I have never heard of this before, Thank you for the education re; this, I will be happily passing this on. TY

  • alviracher

    I think this a excellent Idea if people would put it into play.

  • alviracher

    I also have a rescue dog she was a puppy an is my best friend an very mellow but we have run into dogs at the park that a warning to stay back would have been a good thing

  • kris0226

    Please just visit this Karen’s Facebook. Just click on her name and it’ll take you there. I never comment on this stuff, but really, this lady is crazy. She has so many anti pit bull posts if she knew anything about rehabilitating dogs she would know pits can be the most fantastic dogs.

  • Carlie Lamiroy

    Ok, I just want to clear up what seem to be some running misconceptions I’m seeing about this article/idea.
    1. The yellow ribbon is NOT meant to denote a dog that is overtly aggressive. If you have a dog that would go out of its way to attack a person or another dog while out on a walk, that dog should probably not be out in public, or at the very least should be muzzled. The point of the yellow ribbon project is to alert someone approaching that, for one of a myriad of reasons, this dog does not want to say hello. It doesn’t mean the dog is mean or unsafe, just that it’s maybe worried, injured, grumpy, or even just in training. This is the kind of dog that, if you just walk on by, it’s not going to try to go after you; it just might not appreciate a little kid (or mob of kids) or another overly excited dog invading its space. This applies to a TON of dogs who are perfectly nice! I have a yellow ribbon dog who happens to love kids and doesn’t mind being mobbed, but who is worried about strange men and annoyed by strange dogs. I have complete confidence that he would never bite someone, but I would rather he not be made needlessly anxious by these experiences, so he wears the ribbon. I have another dog who recently underwent medical treatment that required strict crate rest for two months. She got a few short walks per day just to go potty, and while she is THE friendliest dog you’ll ever meet, she wore a yellow ribbon to tell people to stay away, because greeting people and other dogs got her too excited and could potentially hinder her recovery. Those are just two possible reasons that a perfectly friendly dog might wear the ribbon!
    2. The yellow ribbon does NOT mean that the handler of a dog is off the hook for being vigilant about their dog’s surroundings. If you have a dog that warrants a yellow ribbon, you should always be on the lookout for people who aren’t paying attention. There are a lot of idiots out there – unsupervised children, clueless parents, clueless dog owners, off-leash dogs, etc. I think the vast majority of people who have a “yellow ribbon” dog are well aware of their dog’s limits and already paying attention to the surroundings. ALL the yellow ribbon is supposed to do is warn a conscientious dog owner or parent who is approaching from a distance that this dog does not want to say hi. This allows the other person the option to reign in their dog/children, even cross the street or take a different pathway, so as not to invade the dog’s space. If the other person doesn’t know what the ribbon means or doesn’t heed it, then the handler of the dog in question is still responsible for giving a verbal warning, turning and going the other direction, etc. (and I think if a person who has a yellow ribbon dog would try to use it as justification for not being vigilant, they probably aren’t that responsible or vigilant anyway – I don’t think the yellow ribbon is going to make any previously responsible handlers slack off!)
    3. The yellow ribbon does NOT mean we should throw out or stop talking about good dog etiquette! Children should be taught to ALWAYS ask before petting a strange dog, and to take no for an answer, and owners of friendly dogs should ALWAYS ask before allowing their dog to say hello. This should be part of the discussion any time we’re talking about the yellow ribbon project, because it could use some awareness, too.
    4. For those who take issue with the color, keep in mind that while yellow does have some positive connotations, it is also traditionally used as a color that means “caution” – think construction signs, deer warning signs, the “warning wet” floor signs, police caution tape, etc. Red denotes danger, which is not necessarily appropriate. Perhaps orange would have been a better choice, but yellow is a perfectly reasonable color.
    5. For everyone saying it won’t work because no one has heard of it, um, DUH. It’s a brand new idea. They’re currently raising awareness. Of course no one has heard of it yet, and so its effectiveness is limited. That’s the point. Now you’re aware of it. Go tell a friend.

    • http://www.Makana-Mai-Akua-Inc.com/ Debi

      Great points and I think it’s critically important that the points in #3 are promoted in this campaign. I am well aware of my dog’s behavior and take responsibility. It’s other people’s lack of common sense that causes me problems… letting their children (or themselves) run up to him; letting their own friendly dog come jump on him; or having their own dogs off-leash (there are leash laws where I live and I’m not referring to a dog park… just out and about in the neighborhood). I was always taught to ask permission before approaching a dog. I wish parents today would teach their kids the same.

  • e-learning

    Sadly the comments are way more entertaining than the article itself. Karen please keep commenting because I could not stop laughing both with you and at you. Ill give this you are passionate about training dogs but some of what you stated is contradictory. You dont want dogs to get trained using treats but then cite as your evidence that all other species are trained in this manner? Also your comparing whales to dogs and Im just guessing they’re biological differences that may require different methods. On a final note ppl with very strong opinions scare me because they are not open the possibility that other opinions exist and therefore unable to understand the basic premise that there are many ways to get the dog to lay down.

    • Karen

      I think I may have given you the wrong I idea if you think I want dogs to get trained with treats. I simply believe in a balanced approach to training, which means boundaries and corrections along with praise and rewards. I personally don’t use treats for teaching basic obedience commands and I certainly don’t use them on dogs with “issues”. I do use them to jack my performance dog up prior to going into a class and I also use them when I shape unnatural behaviors, such as training my dog to fetch a tissue from the box when I sneeze, or to pick up his toys and put them in the toy bin. Some dogs are ok with treats but I’ve found other become more obsessed with the treat than with performance. I trained a dog I acquired back in the 80s (the one severely abused) to perform a variety of silly tricks and never gave him a treat his entire life. Back then I didn’t know anyone that gave treats, you trained with lots of praise and “good boys”. Treats can certainly help some dogs learn faster but I believe all but the most biddable dogs must also learn what NOT to do and require consequences for poor choices to be reliably trained. There comes a time when the cookie is just not as important to a dog as chasing a squirrel, running after a kid, or bolting out the door after another dog.

  • Joyce Ferguson

    So another way to let people stay in their little dark corner. All parents should be intelligent enough to know to use caution when nearing ANY strange dog! An animal which has never shown agression can have a bad day. I was taught this at an eally age; as were my children and grand children. All should be taught this!!

    • Abigail Drew Patridge

      Exactly! They are JUST LIKE US. And I dunno about anyone else around here, but come a certain time I’ll lash out even at people I care about most if approached the wrong way. Dogs can get like that too. Or cats. Or any other animal you might wish to adopt into your family.

  • Chris

    Ridiculous that what is supposed to be a forum for loving dogs has turned into attacking each other – shame on you all that participated in that! Please focus the conversation on helping dogs – whatever method helps the dog you have. It’s not a contest to see who is the best – it is about finding what helps your animals. It should be celebrated that there are a variety of methods that work.

  • Jim

    I’m thinking they should have picked another color…yellow ribbons have become too commonplace as a symbol of memoriam, support, and awareness. By putting yellow on a dogs collar/leash, your just going to create a lot of confusion that may not end well for the dog or the public. 99% of the populations is going to think it is a symbolic gesture of support….not a warning of a potentially dangerous situation with the dog.

    This is piss poor exicution of what might be a good idea.

    • Heather Pettit

      For horses who may kick, strike, or bite, red ribbons are used. This seems like a more logical color choice to me.

      • Jim

        Exactly…

  • shyone

    wow Karen you need to look up on different breeds of dogs before giving advice. Ops I forgot you train and rescue dogs but yet you bash pit bulls. I have four dogs I make my own dog treats its easy( mix 2cups wheat flour, 1cup peanut butter, 1/3cup milk, 1tsp baking soda,roll in ball bake at 350 for 10-15min.) my dogs love them I must be doing something rt cause the vet says all four dogs are at the rt wt and have healthy teeth.

  • Tommy Turek

    They should have a ribbon for people who’s dogs are not dog friendly or snippy, My dog is not very friendly and I make it clear when I meet people with dogs but some people have thire dog off the leash and it runs too my dog and I say my dog isin’t friendly and they say thire dog is friendly what good is that when I have a dog off the leash running twords my dog on a leash and my dog is 13 now when she was younger I didn’t care much she could handle herself now I have to protect her.

  • Paul Layman

    Did the Honey Badger dude write this article? This is the gayest thing that I’ve read in a while. I’m so tired of ribbons, pins, magnets, and bumper stickers that make us ‘aware’. Bite me

  • Heather Tubbs

    This is the first I have ever heard of this. I still believe the owner needs to control the situation. My child has been bitten twice by two different dogs. Dogs that bite and are not human friendly shouldn’t be near people…

    • Becki

      If you read the article in its entirety…. ” The dog may not be child friendly, may have fear or anxiety issues, or may be overly excited. Either way, caution should be applied when approaching. ” THIS DOES NOT MEAN AGGRESSIVE or NOT human friendly.

  • Beverly Ann VanMierlo

    Actually, the yellow ribbon around the old oak tree was originally about a guy being released from prison (listen to the words of the original, it’s rather obvious). It was adopted by the military and families later on.

  • Luciana Lapedota

    In Western Australia most of our leads have a yellow ribbon tied to the lead because our doggy poo bags are yellow. Here its not a warning just a poo bag.

  • MHALLIGAN83

    our dog lease has a blue bag tied to it. we use it to pick up his poop.i like the yellow ribbon concept.

  • hakkiri

    really mature commenters here… *headache*

    anyways—yellow ribbon. fascinating concept!

  • Carol Eales Stanley

    I hear the controversy in all the comments. Mostly it seems people are upset at Karen not liking some breeds. The focus is the Yellow Ribbon. And People! I like the idea. It will alert me when I am in a park (or somewhere) with my Grands and they want to “love” on the dogs around the,. I hope it catches on. Right now I tell them to approach the owner first…this will be a “heads up” for me to help the animal as well as my Grands. THANK YOU!!!

  • dbw

    Wow talk about really getting off the subject, the whole thing is the yellow ribbon on the collars of are dogs. I have a full blood red nose pit and a wolf, both are very friendly, and are cat, well let me say that he is the biggest instigated in the house, but I’ll say this though if you show fear, well you can get your but bit, show no fear, be sure of what you do, and stand your ground, and when they do what you want them to, give them prays and they will start really fast to trust you. All yall can say bs all you want to, and I can tell you that you never know how to transform a bad dog to a good dog.;-)

  • Jason M

    This is dumb. How about if the dog’s owner takes responsibility and prevents anyone from coming near the dog. Keep the dog on a short leash right by your side. Be vocal so no one comes near your dog, especially if the owner decides to take this maladjusted dog in public. Leaving it up to other people to figure out your dog is mean, scared, anti-social, or has a mental defect is poor ownership!

  • Joyce Childers Wallace

    People also need to realize that not everyone wants a strange dog near them. My local home improvement store has become the dog walking place of choice. I don’t want their dogs jumping on me!! First, I’m highly allergic; secondly, I witnesses an up-close dog attack a few years ago, and want nothing to do with strange dogs; and third, they usually SMELL. Recently, while changing aisles attempting to avoid one, the man finally cornered me, telling me, I want you to pet him so you’ll know he isn’t dangerous! “And watch me have an asthma attack? NO WAY!!!!! ” He was shocked to realize I wanted nothing to do with his dog! Another brought a dog in, that was running up behind customers and jumping on them! When she started to let it do that to me, I informed her to keep the dog away from me. She snapped, “He just wants to play!” NOT WITH ME!! So do I have to start wearing a ribbon of some color to inform rude dog owners to stay their distance?

  • Sarah

    Great concept; however I would have chosen an alternative color. Yellow to most Americans signifies veteran or support for veterans. Honesty my first thought would have been that perhaps the animal was a retired service (military/police) dog.
    Glad I read the article! ;)

  • heenan73

    I can find no record of it meaning that – and if it did, then I’d tie it to a friendly dog, not a killer. Red, however, does offer a warning – but why a ribbon at all? Why not a red flag?

    Yellow “Support Our Troops” Ribbon seems have more traction.

    Had you heard of this dog ribbon before? I think these people are making it up.

  • Sarah

    Great concept; however I would have chosen an alternative color. Yellow to most Americans signifies veteran or support for veterans. Honesty my first thought would have been that perhaps the animal was a retired service (military/police) dog.
    Glad I read the article! ;)

  • Sarah

    Great concept; however I would have chosen an alternative color. Yellow to most Americans signifies veteran or support for veterans. Honestly my first thought would have been that perhaps the animal was a retired service (military/police) dog.
    Glad I read the article! ;)

  • mj991

    My Australian cattle dog is really big (70 lbs) and jumpy and makes less than friendly dog sounds. He’s super friendly and lovey but since he jumps and makes people uncomfortable we put a yellow bandana on his leash. He’s a great dog, but with his size and the fact that he is definitely mixed with pit bull we want to be cautious. He is also a little unpredictable at times so we want people to approach slowly so we can shorten his leash if necessary. The more people know about this the better. I heard about the yellow ribbon project a couple years ago and used it to train both of my dogs.

  • Tony Bifulco

    its pretty clear KAREN is a BITCH and a typical know it all when in truth has no gd idea

  • Bruce Jackson

    Because the Yellow ribbon has been, for years, the sign of someone being missed I think this is going to get more people hurt than it helps./ “Oh poor dog misses their master? Here, let me pet you…..” folks need to think some things through. Besides there is already a signal for a dog that may not be friendly. It is called a muzzle.

  • http://www.wyomingasatru.com Amy D. Bernard

    This is a carry on of the habit horse people use to note & mark kickers. A red ribbon tied in the tail hair is the given, default warning for a horse that kicks.

    This is a very good idea for all dog owners with canines with issues.

    Now as to the infighting about dog training methods…
    The wise person would tailor the training method to the canine.
    For a Husky, wolf hybrid, or any canine that has more than a touch of wild in it then pack discipline would / should work for someone who is strong enough to keep the pack in line & knowledgeable enough to know the subtle signals that pack members give to each other. Some domestic canines can adapt to pack mentality. This is the technique that Mr. Milan uses, I’ve used it with the wolf hybrids I’ve had, & a few of the standard domestic canines who could adapt. Personally I prefer canines that can adapt to the pack mentality.
    For a canine that either can’t adapt to the pack or has no pack instinct then proper discipline combined with loving, firm, consistent correction specific to that dog will work, it may take more time than the human can, will, or should put into the effort.

    I’ve used both modes of rehab for various dogs when I worked with the Yuma Co. AZ. shelter, I was one of their main rehab people & I got the red line dogs. In 5 years of working with them I had only one canine I could not rehab past a certain point. He’d been used as a fighting dog for 2 + years & was not safe around anything that was small & fluffy or around other male dogs even a year into rehab. I kept him for the rest of his life but he had to stay on leash if outside & under constant verbal control when inside my house.

  • Linda Dewey

    You know what people. I’ve never heard so much BS in all my life. I’m embarrassed to even say that you people are even part of the human race. Do any of you even know her qualifications? Probably not!! Your all just a bunch of hypocrites.
    Does or has she told any of you that you don’t qualify for your jobs.
    What I see from all of you are you are so quick to jump on her because she made a statement.
    Just how do any of you know if what she’s saying isn’t true for her.
    I have a small dog that would sooner bite someone if they get around me.
    Children have a tendency to run up to him and start grabbing at him.. I automaticly pick him up because he starts shaking violently because he’s scared. He’s only 4lbs. But kids only do things like this because the parents don’t treat their children to walk up to any dog with caution.
    Your all worse than children on a playground being and acting like bullies.
    I am personally glad that I don’t know any of you.
    You ought to all be ashamed of yourself for attacking her the way that you have.

  • Barry Newman

    Good idea can’t believe it came from New York though.

  • ron

    I was reading most of the comments with interest but the further i went i realized there are a lot of rude people here that wouldn’t say a word face to face just so rude and i’m out of here.

  • Lou Meeth Worden

    My dog loves children, but is wary on the leash and doesn’t want anyone near me. I have never heard of this yellow ribbon thing before. When I first got her rescued) she was terrified of children, especially in groups and over the years has come to find that they are fun. Nonetheless, I would definitely use this idea for her while she is on her leash. She feels protective of me until I take off the leash, then she just runs like a regular dog and gets along well with other dogs and people.

  • TheGrittyEdge

    Seriously? A yellow ribbon is going to absolve the irresponsible or lazy dog owner of controlling their pet and place the responsibility on a child? Here’s an idea dog owners/walkers. CONTROL YOUR DOG !

    • TheGrittyEdge

      I forgot to also add… Parents, CONTROL YOUR KIDS!

  • Mike

    I never hears of it. seems like a lawsuit waiting to happen to me. if you know your dog could be dangerous and then you tell people that by putting on a yellow ribbon, seems like you are asking for trouble.

    • Carrie

      I would agree with that but don’t forget it also said nervous, hurt, likes to jump, plus more. Not just for dangerous dogs. :)

  • Lee Bailey

    wow ……frightening to think so many aggresive and argumentative people own and take care of dogs ……if thats your attempt at interaction with other humans …………not a good example for our four legged friends…im going somewhere else..:(

  • Carrie

    We have a Pitt mix here at home with major hyperactivity but so gentle with children (rather it be newborns or teens or anything in between) and adults. I have thought of doing this for her because of that and the fact that she is very protective of her home and her “pack” (if you don’t know what I mean it means her family.) We also have a four year old Lab/Dob mix that is now getting vet care for a back knee she blew out from doing whatever outside (it was genetic so even if we were watching I couldn’t stop it) so I might do this for her too when she is using that leg again. The picture below has all three of our dogs.

    For they who think I don’t know what I am talking about I have not only raised and trained my own I have also helped others with training their dogs. Also I’m going to school now to be a vet tech.

  • sam_the_cat

    I think we should just teach children to approach all dogs with caution and to ask their owners if it’s OK before petting them.

    • fiveseven15

      but that would be the sensible thing to do….how could you suggest that?

  • TheGrittyEdge

    A little off subject but starting yesterday my FB wall has had no less than three “fireworks scared our dog last night and he/she ran away and is missing” posts????? Am I the only one left scratching my head and wondering under what circumstance that could be possible? Did the dog open the door and run out of the house? Was he/she Left running loose in an un-fenced yard? As a dog owner for over 40 years, I just cant come up with a logical explanation

    • Carlie Lamiroy

      Gate left open or blown open by wind, dog so scared they went through a window or screen or climbed the fence or found a heretofor unknown hole in the fence, dog brought to a party that dashes through the door or otherwise finds a way out…

  • c campbell

    geesh, the purpose of the yellow ribbon is to warn outsiders that the dog might not be friendly or scared regardless of reason/fault.

    • TheGrittyEdge

      a.) totally not necessary if the dog owner/walker has half a brain, and b.) not every dog owner will participate, leaving little Johnny to assume that a dog WITHOUT a yellow ribbon is OK to approach.

  • tlsjrsjas2011

    Horrible advice.

    I’ve never ever seen a yellow ribbon on a dog, leash, etc… People should teach their kids to be wary of ALL dogs upon first meeting (heck subsequent ones as well) and come up cautiously with me to the dog.

  • LJP

    don’t some of you people have anything better to do than just sit around and bitch bitch bitch? Seriously, you make the dogs sound more reasonable and intelligent than most of you.

    • fiveseven15

      they usually are

  • Beth Spencer

    Yellow ribbon for a dog & it doesn’t signify owned by a soldier??? ppl will think that & NOT Caution! Should have picked a different color!

  • Donna Olivadoti

    Maybe you should go with different colored ribbons….if you put a yellow ribbon on every dog they all look exactly the same….like they do now. Green for good to pet, yellow for watch out and red for no way. What is a kid going to learn if you use the same color for everything.

  • Corey Bryant

    Better idea. How about dog owners just pay attention to what is going on if they already KNOW their dog is aggressive in some way, or potentially can be. It’s the owner’s responsibility, not everyone around them. If your dog has issues like that, you should be watching non-stop.

    • Dagummit

      This isn’t just for aggressive dogs and it is not solely the owner’s responsibility. I think this is being done with good intentions but is completely unnecessary. ANY dog should be approached with caution and all owners should be asked before you pet their dog. My dogs are perfectly friendly but, if you ask me if you can pet my dog, chances are that I will say no because I am not out with my dog to be a walking petting zoo.

  • Cheryl

    note to self never take advice from this group my rescue dog will be just fine without these people

  • Mike Doucette

    god damn how hard is it to teach kids to ask and approach the rightway, and teach how to interact with dogs. i have 2 daughters, and since they started walking, talking was on top of that stuff. simple really.

  • Doug

    Never heard of it and really don’t care. The beast belongs to the owner who is responsible for it’s actions. Having some cutesy secret code ribbon tied to its leash doesn’t change that. Children are children, dogs are animals. If you aren’t responsible enough to keep your animals away from other people’s children then you should reconsider your choice to own an animal.

    • H_D_Thoreau

      If you aren’t responsable enough to keep your kids away from strange animals then you should reconsider your choice to having children.

      • Doug

        When raising my children I was responsible enough to keep strange animals away from them by whatever means I deemed necessary. Was also responsible enough to keep strange animal owners from letting their beasts use my yard as their bathroom, another responsibility that beast owners often try to avoid.

        • H_D_Thoreau

          The problem is children are approaching dogs carelessly, and getting bit. Some people have a problem teaching their children about dogs/animals, mostly because they have never owned one. So when i’m out socializing (a process where you introduce your dog slowly to new sounds, smells and sights) my 1.5 year old German Shepherd (a 70lb – 90lb dog) at a park and someone’s child recklessly runs up screaming, my dog is going to get nervous. He’s not a bad dog, he IS trained, but he’s a dog and he doesn’t understand english. Now I have got to react and pull my dog away and get him even more nervous because people like you can’t properly teach a child common sense. If it takes a yellow ribbon for a kid not to charge my dog like he’s a stuffed animal I’ll put 100 of them on there.

          • TheGrittyEdge

            “Now I have got to react and pull my dog away …..” – Correct, that would be your responsibility. If you think putting one or one hundred yellow ribbons on your dog is going to stop out of control children you are delusional!

          • H_D_Thoreau

            You missed my point, i’m only making the experience worse for the dog by jerking him away from the threat. Look the reality is parents need to teach and police up their children because regardless of what “my responsibility is” that kid will never be the same after a bad incident. And if you think you are going to win a law suit while a dog owner is obeying the law you’re wrong.

  • mr_charlie

    this is just a BS attempt by bad dog owners to limit their responsibility for the bad things their dog might do. if a dog has a ribbon on that means the owner should not be bringing the dog to places like a park

    • fiveseven15

      you do realize this could mean anything from the dog snaps to he’s a jumper. it doesn’t mean every dog is cujo, it just means be cautious and alert (something you should be doing around any unfamiliar animal anyway)

      • mr_charlie

        train your dog properly and if the dog is not properly trained do not put him in situations where his lack of being properly socialized will impact others. there are very few bad dogs, there are many very bad owners of dogs

    • H_D_Thoreau

      No, it is used by dog owners who are tired of getting blamed for your uncontrollable kid running at my dog, scaring my dog, and then getting bit. I personally don’t use/need a ribbon because I’ll kick a kid square in the chest if he comes running toward my dog. My dog and I both enjoy this.

      • mr_charlie

        you must be a libtard from CA. if you or your muttassault me or one of my loved ones you would be one very sorry person, if you survive

  • Patricia Terry Bandy

    In the horse world, riding down the trail you see a horse with a red ribbon tied to his tail, what does that mean? Beware, I have been known to kick, so stay out of range.

  • AB

    This is a great idea! I love animals and so do my children and it is really hard to keep them from running up and petting a strange dog. When we are in the park I think I yell, “Don’t touch that dog until you ask the owner” at least 50x!!! Now this could be used with other color coded warnings… yellow caution!!

  • Ralph

    Gosh you people argue allot.Dogs are dogs. We will never know whats in their head but as the Top species we have an obligation to treat other species with with respect and if we want them in our families we need to have love for them.Anything less then we fall short of what our creator does for us.

    • TheGrittyEdge

      how do you figure that we are the top species?

      • http://twitter.com/Lady_Liberty10 Heidi Ulrich

        The knowledge to chose , such as right and wrong , good and bad , harm and care for example makes humans the top species over other animals. Of course not all human exercise this knowledge as well as some animals who do not possess this ability, which creates much confusion :(

      • H_D_Thoreau

        Because we have mapped the stars, identified the components of an atom and mapped the human genome! We are unique in the fact we can control and master our enviroment which gives us the ability to live almost anywhere in the world.

  • Ralph

    The yellow ribbon is a good idea.I have a mini dachshund and it only likes four people in the world. Everyone’s wants to pet him as he is cute and fluffy but he doesn’t like something bigger than him messing around with him so I have to tell people all the time “No don’t pet him”. He is afraid of little kids. If nondog owners would show respect it wouldn’t be a problem.

  • Elaine Lake

    The problem with this is that the irresponsible owners are the ones who need to put the ribbon on their dog leashes but are the ones who are too lazy to do it. They are either too lazy or they don’t believe that their dog(s) pose a threat to anyone or anything. Maybe we need a yellow ribbon around the necks of the irresponsible owners.

  • LeeFW

    If your dog is known to attack surely a muzzle is necessary not a ribbon? Owners of dangerous animals shouldn’t put the responsibility on everyone else to be cautious. A ribbon isn’t good enough.

    • Itou Kyuuji

      Well, if the dog is so vicious that it would attack people on sight, they wouldn’t be at the park with it…. if they have any sense at all.

      The yellow ribbon is more of a “approach slowly and carefully as not to excite, upset, or panic the dog” My nephew has an Akita that is great with children, but if a child runs up to it, it’ll pounce on them because it thinks the child is trying to play with it.

    • H_D_Thoreau

      I don’t know why we let kids off their leahes anyway? It’s simple put your kid on a leash and don’t touch my dog.

  • slappybeaver

    The song “Tie A Yellow Ribbon” is actually about a guy returning from a stint in prison, it was then adopted for returning soldiers.

  • Robert Ramin

    I like this idea, hopefully it will take some of the blame off of the owner and ultimately the dog if someone walks up, pets your dog and gets bit.

  • Dina

    Learned something here. I have never heard of the yellow ribbon. Good idea.

  • Dalmatian90

    This is absolutely backwards.

    Most dog owners, even of fearful dogs, will have never heard of this and teaching kids to be wary of yellow ribbons gives them a false sense of security that only yellow-ribboned dogs need extra caution.

    The initiative should be to have a ribbon color that indicates the dog and owner would appreciate someone approaching…and if they don’t have that ribbon, then always use caution in approaching.

  • Barbara Winters

    I never know that. When I see a yellow ribbon, I will respect that.

  • turmn8

    Stay away from anything that has a heading of “Global”. Not the dog but the organization., i.e Global warming. Stay within your borders.

  • Shawn Ravenfire

    I think if the issue here is safety, something clearer would be needed, like a big red sign that says “caution.” It’s hardly safe to put a yellow ribbon on a dog on the off chance that the person approaching has read this very article, especially considering that yellow ribbons are so ubiquitous anyway, what with supporting troops.

  • Angie

    I have a question, since many of you seem to know a lot about training dogs (regardless of the argument going on lol). I adopted a medium size dog from a shelter, they say she is a Border Collie Mix, but I don’t believe it. I actually think she is a Jack Russell mix with a larger dog of some sort, she’s about 40lbs. Anyway, she’s VERY animal aggressive. In the shelter she was perfectly fine. Submissive, sweet, never barked at another dog or anything. As soon as I got her home I introduced her to my Golden Retriever through the fence and she went ballistic. I slowly got them used to each other (my Golden is super excited about making new friends so I had to calm him too) and now they’re best friends. But, I can’t seem to get her to calm down about other animals. Christmas morning, for example, a cat got into our backyard and I ended up in the emergency room because I saved the cat and the cat bit me several times (which is fine, I’d rather that than a dead kitty). I’m a single mom of 3 kids, which she is great with, and she’s great with people in general, but it makes it hard for me to do the type of training that she really needs. I don’t want to take her back to the shelter because I made a commitment to her and she’s a part of our family, but I don’t know what else to do at this point either. Any suggestions?

    • Karen

      You can find some good videos on dealing with leash aggression on the solidk9training channel on Youtube. Just put that in the search bar. And no, he’s not my husband; I’ve never met the man. Just understand that one, being a terrier, and two, you not having the experience this guy has, it won’t go as smoothly and quickly as he shows. My first foster was a small terrier and he had horrible leash aggression. It took me a full month to get him passing other dogs on just a flat buckle collar and most of his progress happened in the last week. In the first couple of weeks, I could have drop kicked him across the street and he wouldn’t have noticed he was so “in the zone”. I did notice that if allowed to approach a dog, once he got up close, he was fine – he didn’t like being “held back” when he wanted to go to a dog, but dogs shouldn’t be greeting (my neighbor used his dogs to help me out a bit).

    • Angela

      Thank you for keeping your commitment to the pup! I completely understand as I’m a single mom too and my first dog started resource guarding when I brought my second one home. Do you have a local SPCA? They can be a great resource to put you in contact with trainers who can come to your home so you don’t have to go to group environments until you and your dog are ready. Check the SPCA website or the shelter where you got your dog.

      Good luck :-)

      • Angie

        Do you know if that’s expensive though? I can’t really afford much. I have so much going on right now, financially speaking. I really really want to get her trained though, I’m terrible at it! I think I’m just too much of a push-over. lol She can be quite destructive too, tearing up the fence in the backyard, chewing on everything (especially crayons and markers..she LOVES crayons and markers!). She has got a little better about that, it only takes a look now..I don’t have to chase her down to get it away from her. lol She really is such a sweet dog to people. Very cuddly and loving, and her and my 4yr old son are best friends. She lets him pull on her ears or tail, roll all over her and they chase each other around everywhere..She just turns into a completely different dog when another animal is around. I really think that she was basically a wild dog before the shelter got her, she was a stray so they didn’t have any information.

  • Bill Price

    BETTER FKN IDEA BEAT YOUR FKN KIDS FOR RUNNING AT A STRANGE DOG !!!

  • Renee

    I’ve never seen a yellow ribbon on a dog leash before. And if I ever did, “anxious dog” isn’t what I would think when I saw it. My first thought would be “This dog’s human is in the military and is deployed.” They might want to rethink the yellow ribbon thing and try something a little more obvious.

  • Joseph Griffin

    Shouldn’t people put a ribbon on a dog if they’re safe? The majority of people probably don’t know about this idea so it would be better to indicate if the dog is friendly. Just saying.

  • Meg

    This seems like it is kind of useless until it’s something that everyone and their mother knows. It seems like it would be more likely to a kid to go up to this yellow-ribboned dog and be like, “oh, look at this pretty ribbon!” or inquire about it, than to know to proceed with caution. Or, maybe it is truly for decoration. I’ve definitely had yellow bandanas around my very-kid-friendly dog’s neck before, because we were at a public sporting event and cheering for the team whose colors were yellow, or just because I felt particularly sunny and cheerful that day.

  • hdhdhu

    Never heard of that.

  • Eleanor Jacobs

    I am going to print this and put it up at my dog park! SO many people/dog combos there could use this idea. well done yellow dogs!

  • Renea

    I really think it is best to continue to teach kids to proceed with caution with ANY animal, not just ones with a yellow ribbon. I have never seen or heard of this.

  • Daniel

    The Tony Orlando song is about a man just released from prison.

  • Carey

    there needs to be a different color ribbon used; yellow ribbons mean support our troops; also, military spouses use them when their family member(s) are away.

  • Eleanor Jacobs

    lots of dog “experts” here. i love how every conversation about dogs de-evolves into “pits are discriminated against” and pontificating experts. the yellow ribbon is a great idea. doesn’t ask you to do anything other than give a visual cue to warn and start a conversation with those maybe too quick to assume a dog is friendly.

  • Carla R Theisen

    i have heard of this and i have told a lot of my friends who have dog’s that did not know the information now they know what the yellow ribbon means

  • John W. Conrad III

    As an attorney, I have to state this may not be such a great idea. Some states, Maryland for one (only place I am able to practice) have a “one bite rule,” which in essence means: if an animal has shown NO propensity for aggressive or violent behavior and bites, the owner is not necessarily liable (there are always exceptions). However, after that first incident (fallacy of the “one bite rule” is that a “bite” is not required; growling and snapping are sufficient) the owner can be held strictly liable for the animal’s behavior. In other words, the yellow ribbon could be used as evidence in a lawsuit that the owner was aware that their animal was inherently dangerous and took it into a public forum anyway. Therefore, the owner is responsible for any aggressive behavior or damage inflicted by the animal whether justified or not. It can be applied harshly. But, on the other hand, if some ding-a-ling walks up to “yellow ribbon dog” and says “dangerous dog, huh?”, and reaches in to pet and pulls back a bloody stump, the argument could be made that the person contributed to their injury or assumed the risk of the injury and is barred from recovery as a result. Still, getting a big verdict or getting dismissed from a suit is pretty immaterial if your companion has been destroyed because you didn’t have enough sense to keep it away from situations that could get “hot.” Remember who knows the rules and who doesn’t. Always be careful. My dog means more to me than any amount of money. By nature, all dogs are territorial. Even though my dog has never shown the slightest propensity towards aggression, I will NEVER put her in a position willingly that might cause a problem. Take the advice or don’t take it. It is my New Years gift to my fellow dog lovers.

  • R Annie

    Interesting article, but I would sure hate to see someone get sued because they didn’t have a ribbon on their dog. Instead of teaching the meaning of a ribbon, why don’t we just get back to using COMMON SENSE and teach EVERYONE to ALWAYS approach an animal they don’t know with CAUTION???

    • Ramona FuzzyBunny Ledwon

      Wish that were true but people just don’t listen. Even when educated. I have had multiple instances of stupid people even after I told them no don’t touch my dog. One of which was in my own fully fenced in back yard. Some stupid person stuck their childs arm through my fence to pet my dogs. And putting up a “Beware of Dog” sign claims your dog is vicious unfortunately. I have talked to police and lawyers in regards to these signs. Stupid and ignorant people just don’t care to learn or listen.

  • Ryan_Knows

    I don’t see the point here. It’s not like you can claim that when your dog bites someone that the bitten person should have known not to get too close because you had a yellow ribbon.

  • Sammy Gonsalves- Kobayashi

    These ribbons should be red for CAUTION. It’s easier to see from afar and its a color which would obviously trigger to be careful. Yellow to me us a friendly color. :)

  • sugarloveer

    Interesting article .I love this club for older men seeking younger women or older women seeking younger men , local sexy singles hit me up on Agegapsingles.C0M ..

  • Jon

    I have a recue who loves children and other people, just not other dogs. Is there a ribbon color for that?

  • Michelle White

    I have worked with various 4-H dog projects, and never heard of this until now. But that said- I think this is a wonderful idea- for kids, adults, dogs, and handlers trying to work a dog that is in need of special TLC, and everyone should promote it!

  • April Robinson

    Kinda like seeing a red ribbon in a horse’s tail…..he kicks.

  • http://ak-thenextchapter.blogspot.com/ Ann-Katrin B

    I’m sorry but that is the single most stupid dog-idea I have heard this year. ALL dogs should be approached with caution. This will only if really EVERY dog in the world has this, or children will assume that those who don’t are safe when it is just the owner who didn’t hear about the campain. Do it the other way around. The few dogs that you DON’T need to approach with care and where you DON’T need to pay attention could be marked as safe. Not the other way around.

  • Gretchen Zimmermann

    I was taught as a child to always ask the owner’s permission before petting a strange dog. This seems to still be the standard in “dog manners”. Most of the children I meet when I’m out with my dogs now either ask permission to pet them or avoid them entirely. To introduce a yellow ribbon code implies that dogs who do not have one can be petted and groped by anyone. The yellow ribbon idea is well intentioned, but I think it is a mistake. Better to teach people to approach all dogs with respect and caution and not to pet unless invited.

  • Holly Joy

    My dog (chihuahua) is 5 and has snapped at people in the past when they get too close to his face or approach him too quickly. Yesterday, he snapped at my friend and bit her lip. I’m totally freaked out by this. Any tips on how to deal with this?

  • JustBob1

    I can’t help but wonder if this “yellow ribbon” thing is the brain child of the Trial Attorneys.

    When you put a yellow ribbon on your dogs leash and he/she then bites someone, it won’t be hard for the plaintiff’s lawyer to make a jury believe that you KNEW your dog was hostile, unsafe, and should not be out in public. And furthermore that given your indifference and wreckless disregard for the safety of others, the plaintiffs injuries were not only foreseeable, but inevitable. The lawyers will tell the jury that not only should you be made to pay compensatory damages, (medical bill, pain and suffering, emotional distress, loss of consortium, blah, blah, blah), but you should also be made to pay PUNITIVE damages,…..to punish you for being so wreckless and indifferent to the safety and well -being of others.

    I know you love your dog, but if it’s not safe for him/her to be out in public,….don’t make a bad situation worse!

  • Steven

    What a horrible idea. Children should never approach a dog without asking the owner first, and parents should never let children approach a dog without supervision. This is basically teaching kids that by default, all dogs should be approached.

  • Cyndy

    As the dog is getting closer, you see a yellow ribbon tied on the dog’s collar. What goes through your mind?

    The first thing I think of is support your troops

    I had never heard of the yellow ribbon project. It is a very good thing to know. Are there any other ribbons for dogs that mean different things?

  • RussinSactown

    People should just assume that all dogs can bite. Approach all dogs slowly and carefully

  • Reasonable2012

    Have seen a red ribbon used for dogs that are dog aggressive. Would be helpful to mention that too. If you see a dog with a red ribbon on its collar, it means your dog should not run up to it (whether on leash or off) as many are wont to allow.

  • Mistagee

    these ribbons should be tied to people.

  • wicknrave

    It would’ve been nice if whoever is trying to start this would’ve picked the universal “stop” color of red. We use red bandannas frequently for the same reasons. Yellow ribbons have long held other meanings, none of which mean what this person is trying to start.

  • Tyler Baum

    I have owned 2 pitbulls in my life, one since birth, and the other that I got as a rescue a few weeks ago. Both dogs are absolutely sweet, but the rescue is a nervous nelly, if I pick up anything to use as a toy, (stick, stuffed animal, etc.) He cowers thinking I’m going to hit him. This has nothing to do with the type of dog, and everything to do with the previous owners, any dog can be an aggressive fighting dog, its all how you raise them, I figured a dog lover such as you karen would know that.

  • Mistagee

    How dumb is this? Now there will be green for dogs with epilepsy, blue for dogs that eat only organic treats, pink for bisexual/gay/transgender dogs, black for depressed dogs, white for virgin dogs, I mean give me a break. People should ask before approaching a dog. Period. No need for us to learn a whole new slew of color ribbons, I mean come on.

  • Stacy Ricco

    A simple yellow ribbon is a horrible idea. The meaning isn’t universally known and it can mean other things. A clearer sign is needed. I found these awhile ago and I love them. I hand out business cards for the site to every dog owner I know. http://www.friendlydogcollars.com.au/

  • David Wilks Cordle

    They should use yellow CAUTION striped tape or DANGER instead because to me this would indicate something to do with the military members.

  • Jacq

    God forbid we teach our children to ask to pet strange animals. God forbid those of us who have animals who are child/other animal/people skittish for whatever reason take responsibility to protect the pet and not take them to crowded parks. The sole responsibility is on everyone else!

    I say this in having two children who have been taught since they could walk to ask to pet strange animals and a dog who is not child/pet friendly. We don’t take him to the park because we know he can’t handle it. We take him for walks in the neighborhood where it is quieter and he feels more comfortable.

    • Karen

      My last dog was a 90 lb Rhodesian Ridgeback. She was very well trained (both on and off leash) and well socialized and friendly and I took her a lot of places with me. Once while out, a dad and mom actually said to their little girl to “go pet that pretty doggy”. The girl looked at her parents and told *them* that you should never pet a stranger’s dog without asking. She had apparently learned this from a police officer that came to their school to give a talk on dog safety! The 6 or 7 year old kid knew more about dog etiquette than her parents! I did let her pet my dog (after complimenting her on her great manners) and while my dog was friendly, who tells their kid to go pet a guarding breed dog that is twice their size?!

  • Donna Tearle Pelletier

    What a shame the comments thread regarding the yellow ribbon idea has been completely lost to bickering…

  • Derek Michael Rollins

    I think this is the dumbest thing yet …. you place a ribbon on you dog if its aggressive or excited easily? So children and other adults know . first of all any dog can bite or become aggressive when a random stranger is about to pet it , its the owners responsibility to inform other’s , . most people that are bitten by dogs don’t realize its their own stupidity , especially children , the parents should know better not to let your kids pet unfamiliar dogs , it has bad news all over it.most dogs are made to be aggressive due to poor owners and neglect . put yourselves in a dogs life for just a moment , think about a handful of people at a park wanting to pet you , you get a little scared and bite someone , basically self defense lol. I don’t feel bad at all for any dumbass that wants to confront a strange dog yellow ribbon or not

  • Sandi`

    Excellent article.

  • mel

    It would be great if parents would bother to train their children to have some manners. It would prevent a lot of problems. My children were taught to Never run up and touch a strange dog. Also I did not allow strange children to run up to my dogs. It is just plain bad manners and is the parent’s fault.

  • Penny Ellen Woods

    Does Karen even own a dog? I got my chocolate Lab when he was 6 mths old. He had been kept tied to a tree, in an unfenced yard with his parents & about 6 siblings. “Sampson” was very aggressive….I brought him home and worked with him….he loves me & is my most fierce protector. When I have visitors, I put him outside until my guests are settled….I give them each a doggie biscuit, then let Sampson inside. He is fine. He is NOT fine if someone tries to walk into my house. He is NOT fine if someone comes @ me in a loud & aggressive manner. No one can come into my bedroom when I’m sleeping & no one can come into the bathroom if I am taking a shower. I see no problem with his behavior. I am a responsible dog owner & I work around my dog’s personality. So, yes, Sampson does have “issues”….his main “issue” s his love & protective nature of me!

  • Chismom

    I have a chihuahua that has his moments of just wanting to sniff around and be left alone. He was abused prior to me owning him and, even through my trying to train him, still has issues from time to time. This would be a great idea for when we are walking in the park so that people would ask before bending down to pet him.

  • Caitlin Davis

    WOW you people know how to turn a good little read, into a real GOAT RODEO! so not everyone is a damn dog guiro GET OVER IT!! no reason all of you should be that way… Seems to me a lot of you should be the ones with the yellow ribbon around your own neck and not the dog!

    • TheGrittyEdge

      “güiro” – “a Latin-American percussion instrument consisting of an open-ended, hollow gourd with parallel notches cut in one side.”

  • PlasticOnoJohn

    Nothing like a warning notice that no one has ever actually heard of or is aware of.

  • LaVonne Wathen

    My little dogs are VERY protective of me and more so since 2 much larger dogs (no they were not pit bulls or pit mixes) injured them while they were trying to keep those 2 dogs from attacking me. Since then my dogs get very nervous when we walk in the park if little kids run over to them. This is a great idea which I will be using.

    • TheGrittyEdge

      Do you really expect some kid to know what the yellow ribbon means?

  • AndyStylez

    I respect the attempt, but I think it is a little confusing. If the dog is a possible danger to children, then it should look dangerous. Adorn it with little skulls charms or images of teeth. Obviously you and all owners know the true soul of the dog is good and stuff, but the “thug charms” tie into already established danger symbols to keep kids at a distance.

    A yellow bow sends a conflicting message, and as an unintended consequence, more kids may go up to dogs with emotional issues wearing a bow, then stay away. Instead of trying to make yellow bows a “thing”, it is probably easier to hack into already established psychology. plus, if i were a dog, and I had to wear a yellow bow, I would probably get irritated and snap out more to overcompensate for the shame. Sometimes you gotta just respect a fangster.

  • Deach

    I have never heard of the Yellow Ribbon Dog. I do think that it is a very good idea to have a visible “notice” to let people know the attitude of the dog sporting such a tag. However I am disappointed by the colour of the ribbon that has been chosen. For longer than the past decade, the yellow ribbon has come to represent support for troops (military) serving both at home and abroad/over-seas. This has been a recognized symbol both in the US and Canada. I don’t thing anything malicious or disrespectful is being stated here, it’s just something that should be looked at, and to consider changing it, especially if this initiative is relatively new. Please change the colour of the ribbon used to promote your cause because it is a good idea and deserves its own identity. Thank you – a Canadian Forces Veteran of 22 years.

    • Accidents_happen

      Yellow is the universal color of caution. I believe it predates the military’s use of the yellow ribbon.

      • TheGrittyEdge

        And children know this, how?

        • Accidents_happen

          Exactly how they figure everything out. You teach them. That’s our job as parents. To teach them. How do they know their names, to use the toilet, their ABC’s, etc. It’s a simple concept, really.

      • Deach

        OK, but you may be surprised as to the number of people that may not think seeing a yellow ribbon may mean caution. Orange is a much better colour of caution, example construction signs, vehicles, equipment, signal lights, warning flashers. As I said, I am not trying to cause problems, just trying to point out something you may not have noticed or known. Have a Happy New Year!

  • Renee Maloney

    Renee
    I never knew what this meant. What a great idea. I had a dog who is very excited when he sees or meets people. This will help when I am walking him and a way of educating young children.

    • TheGrittyEdge

      Really? How so? Do you expect young children to know what the yellow ribbon means?

      • That Man

        She said a way of “educating” young children. As in, future tense. Like, she will be doing the educating…

        • TheGrittyEdge

          I see. And what will her answer when that child she just “educated” approaches an aggressive dog whose owner doesn’t participate, and gets bit?

          • Accidents_happen

            It’s called repetitive training. Also known as practicing. As a responsible parent, you don’t let your child just walk up to an unknown dog. And as a responsible dog owner, you don’t let unknown and unattended children pet your dog. So if someone gets bit, it’s not from lack of “education”, it’s from lack of responsibility. I’m guessing you are not a parent, since you’re asking pretty simple questions?

          • TheGrittyEdge

            And I am still waiting for an intelligent answer to my “simple question”………

  • Kjd521

    Caution should be used in approaching any dog or animal for that matter, whether or not there is a yellow ribbon or not.

  • Sean

    Why not an actual sign that says “Warning” or “Stop”? The ribbon is confusing or implies you support our troops.

    • That Man

      My dog’s ribbon says “Free Chelsea Manning”

    • Carol

      Agree. They sell harness and leashes in neon colors that say “caution” etc… or what about just writing caution on a bandana…

  • Gail Contreras

    Always just used red bandanas. Red = Stop :)

  • padugan

    this is the dumbest idea I’ve heard in a while. First, no one knows what this means. second, it’s common sense not to approach a strange dog, you don’t know, regardless of whether they have a ribbon or not. Yet people and children do this all the time. Parents don’t teach there kids how to behave in general, let alone around animals. who actually thinks they will teach them this? My dog loves kids and people, but When we’re out walking and I’m in a hurry, I tell anyone that comes near her, that “she bites”, just to keep them away so we don’t get stuck talking. and yet NO ONE listens. if I’m telling you point blank the dog bites and you could get seriously hurt and that doesn’t stop people or children how in the hell do you think a stupid ribbon is?

    • TheGrittyEdge

      Just lazy dog owners looking for a way to place the blame on someone else when their aggressive dog growls at or bites someone. I guess it’s easier to say, “didn’t you see the yellow ribbon” than ” STOP, my dog is aggressive and will bite”

      • TheGrittyEdge

        Ohhhh dam n. I keep forgetting , we now live in a country where 30% dont speak English.

  • Janet

    I used to have to put a cage muzzle on my dog when we walked him. He doesn’t like 8 – 10 year old boys since neighborhood boys would throw rocks at him when he was in the back yard & they were walking to school. Once I caught them – they got a scolding and told them if he bit them, it would not be my fault!! Now the dog is 15 years old and having trouble getting down the back steps to go out!!!

  • Peter Osnes

    I feel like people just want to participate in this program to remove responsibility for their dog’s misbehavior. A dog that should not be approached should not be in public.

  • Tracy

    Karen it is a known fact that animals have a natural instinct to detect a whether a person is good or not. They are the best judge of character just like a baby is. maybe the rescue your fostering tried to attack you because it can detect through all your b.s. that your not really a nice person. you prejudge animals especially certain breeds and rescues. Maybe your just not the right person to help that dog. Who really knows? I will say I have to dogs and one is a rescue that was thrown from a vehicle at 4 weeks old and she is a pitbull/greyhound mix. She has come a very long way and is a wonderful member of my family. My other dog is a female purebred pitbull that is the biggest lover you will ever meet. Then again both my dogs rescue or not are healthy, happy, and wonderfully behaved. The love people and other animals. The point I see everyone is trying to get across is a viscous dog has nothing to do with its breed but with its environment and owner. And if your rescue is attacking you, maybe you should find something else to do. maybe rescuing is not for you. besides according to you your just a person who wants to help and know nothing. That’s what you said rescuers are and you rescue so I guess you were speaking for yourself. best of luck and do everyone a favor and leave the rescuing to the professionals.

    • Karen

      ROTFL – why do you think she’s been in the shelter for two years or so? Or were all the other shelter workers “not a nice person” either? How about the two people that took her, only to return her for biting? Bad seeds? How about the worker who had her face bitten while setting down a bowl? Did she “detect” through her b.s. too? That funny because she seemed like such a sweet, caring woman to me! But obviously this dog knew better than I! Poor thing has been so busy detecting all the bad elements that come her way that the tips of almost all her teeth are broken off from charging the kennel (I suspect given the way she would hit the front of the crate when charging). I suppose the many dogs she’s gone after were also “not nice”? As for “the professionals”, none of them were willing to take on this dog – that’s why she was in the shelter for over half of her life. They are *thrilled* that I’ve taken her on and I took this particular dog specifically because they asked me to work with her, after the success I had with the last one. Helping shelter dogs is perfect for me – I can train the dogs, which are easy, without having to deal with owners and their thousand excuses (he’s “abused”, he’s “protective”, he’s just “rambunctious”, I could never use that collar, he’s my “furbaby”), for not fixing their dogs. She’s doing just fine with me thank you very much and within another couple of weeks, I think I’ll feel confident placing her. And she is now healthy, happy, and better behaved than about 90% of the general dog population (in the states).

    • TheGrittyEdge

      Look up “Springer Rage” I know first hand all about it. One of the hardest things I have done in my life was to put down an 18 month Old Springer Spaniel. Dont give me that crap about “environment and owner”.

      • Karen

        This is pretty rare among breeds other than the SS. I read a great book about the Springer Rage several years ago but I don’t recall the name. It’s more like a seizure that the dog has no control over.

        • TheGrittyEdge

          seizure or chemical imbalance, phenobarbital MIGHT work (50 % chance), but would require daily dosage for life. I chose not to be selfish and put him down.

          • Karen

            A woman in a forum I’m on had a dog with that. I believe she had him on medication and it did not work. To give an example of how bad it was, she told of him sleeping on a dog bed beside her desk, seemingly dead to the world. While she was sitting there typing, he suddenly sprang away and attacked her. After his attacks, he would act as if he didn’t know what he’d done. She had to have him put down too.

          • TheGrittyEdge

            yes, that’s the typical behavior displayed. Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde one minute the sweetest dog on earth, the next a raging maniac who there was no question acted as if he would rip my face off if given the opportunity, totally unprovoked, at times all it took was a look from me. His eyes would actually turn red!

          • TheGrittyEdge

            for the most part it is irresponsible breeding. turns out my dog had a parent with it. the day I discovered that was the day that I realized the AKC is WORTHLESS!

          • Karen

            I’m a supporter of the AKC (because I compete), but,yeah, they are.

  • cherith_girl

    Great idea for the yellow ribbon. What I’d like to know is, do they have a ribbon color that owners can put on the collar of dogs that can be aggressive?

  • LaVonne Wathen

    I do not expect the child to know but I expect the adult who is with them to understand when I tell them that my dogs do not like little people who run at them and scare them and THEN perhaps an explanation of the yellow ribbon.

  • SBKGUY

    What wrong with what parents have been telling kids for generations “Never pet a strange dog”????

  • John J Sobek

    Better yet train your Children to have good dog awareness, and to approach all dogs as if they do not like kids. My son knows to ask the handler if he can approach a dog, and has been doing this from age 4

  • Tracy

    So this dog is doing so well with you! What happens if when you place her in a new home and she bites them? Then what do you do? Can’t blame the dog. You rehabilitated her. I don’t see how you can say a dogs past doesn’t affect its future when you rehabilitate it. Do you think dogs forget or your just that good that you help it overcome all its past experiences. btw not everyone who rescues and works in shelter are nice or good people.

    • Karen

      As I’ve said earlier, she will only be placed in an experienced home, sans children, with someone that is comfortable being a leader and committed to structure and her daily exercise needs. Her history will not be hidden. If she went to a home where she doesn’t have her needs met, then yes, she can regress. Many perfectly fine dogs are screwed up and end up in the shelter from being “loved too much”. This dog already knows she is capable of controlling her environment so it would be understandable that she will test the new owner to see if they are up to the task of leader or if she needs to take over. With someone that understands dogs as dogs and not little furry “kids”, she will be a very easy dog.

      The dog is doing well with me because to start, she gets an hour (at least) of structured walk each day (at least 45 minutes first thing in the morning). We walk at a very fast clip and she’s not allowed to lag or forge, she must stay right by my left leg, and when something frightens her (which is happening less and less), she must get right back to it; we don’t stand around and dwell on it and I don’t soothe her or comfort her. She must go by things that frighten her and keep moving. If she growls or barks at another dog, she gets a couple of leash corrections with a “let’s go” and we keep moving. That has now stopped completely. The first several days she had to follow me around the house attached to a leash. I did not back down when she went after me (several times) and reacted only to the extent I needed to protect myself. She has had to learn sit, down, stay, and place and she sits by my side in the kitchen, she sits by the tub while I shower, she sits by my bed while I get ready. She has had to do 2-3 long downs a day. She has to sit and wait while I put her food down and give her permission. She has to sit and wait for permission before she goes out a door or comes in. She must walk behind me down the hall and throughout the house. Other than a soft rub on the head as a reward for a command, she got very little attention, if any. She got zero freedom. At 7 days, there was a magical change in her. Her tail started floating (instead of being clamped down), her eyes softened, her ears came up, and she stopped snarling at my dog when he came near. She no longer cowed down in her crate with low snarls but was sitting up, tail wagging, eager to get out. She began to watch me in anticipation. She seeked out contact and interaction not only with my dog but with a strange dog that ran up to her (off-leash with owner not in sight) at the field. This change literally happened overnight. She just woke up one morning with a new attitude.

      Now that her mental state is more balanced, she is allowed supervised freedom in the house. She will run and play with my dog but I have to intervene because she doesn’t know how to play and gets too rough (not aggressive) She follows me around on her own and if I look at her, the tail starts wagging. She can now lie down and relax without the constant tightening/pulling her legs in thing she would do because she was wound so tight. When a stranger came into my house over the holidays, she greeted him like an old friend and adored him, despite the fact he doesn’t like dogs. We’ve had a couple little set-backs but she is a completely different dog than what I bought home. And contrary to what all the furbaby whiners think, I didn’t “dominate” her with force, didn’t harm her, wasn’t mean to her, wasn’t rough with her – all things that would have the opposite effect of what I’m trying to accomplish. What I was was firm, consistent, no-nonsense, and non-reactive (which I challenge most people to do while a snarling dog is leaping at their face repeatedly). I bought her to the office and my co-worker, not really a dog person but likes other people’s, said, “Wow, she loves you! You can tell she’s really bonded to you”.

      Now that she’s in a relaxed state and trusts me as the leader, she can really move forward. She is being constantly introduced to new stressors – dog park (she doesn’t go in with other dogs), busy avenues, hiking, pet stores, crowds, etc. Once I find a muzzle (3 stores last night with no success), she will be allowed to interact with more strange dogs and hopefully learn to play well with others. The more things she forced to deal with and the more fears she must face, the more confident she will become. It’s a process of constantly pushing her out of her comfort zone and stressing her a bit, and then pulling back and letting her recover and then doing it again. I’m also starting to teach her some tricks. This will also help with her confidence and keep her mentally tired. I can’t do much more than that. When the time comes, whomever gets this dog will get a nicely trained dog with a LOT of hours put into her, but after that, it is *their* responsibility to keep her that way. If they do, her past is just that.

  • Victoria Smith

    it would make me think it was a service dog of some sort. red means danger

  • SDB9470

    I would more than likely use the yellow ribbon program just to keep people from running up to my fur-babies or to “warn” other owners to keep their dogs away from mine. This would be for my fur-babies health, safety and comfort not the other person or dog. I wouldn’t want a stranger coming close to my fur-babies anymore than I would want them coming close to my son.

    • Lucky seven Sampson

      Please stop saying “fur-babies”.

  • fieryelf

    I think the notion of putting a ribbon on your dog’s leash sounds like another way to encourage societal stupidity. Parents who don’t teach their kids not to just run up to strange dogs are idiotic. And as an owner, if you know your dog is nervous and anxious it is your responsibility to protect it from stupid. Verbally warn other humans away and tell them to keep their distance.

  • Ruaidrí Ó Domhnaill

    Your children should be taught to ALWAYS get the owner’s permission before approaching a strange dog… ribbon or not!

  • Henry E Sleeth

    How about a different angle? If you have a dog that is really “people friendly” then hang a GREEN RIBBON. When someone sees a greeen ribbon they know that the dog is friendly and the owner is receptive to the attention. If no green ribbon, DO NOT APPROACH THE DOG WITHOUT ASKING THE OWNER FIRST. In other words. do not assume any dog is friendly. check first… This seems sensable to me.

  • Tracy

    thegrittyedge it’s a shame you had to put that dog down. the point is that dogs that have been abused and rescued are the way they are due to environment and previous owner. there are other causes to why dogs are the way the are. There is poor breeding and other issues to why a dog may be the way they are. But the discussion with Karen is that of rescued/abused dogs which are a product of their environment. As Karen stated it’s the rescuers fault because rescuers are people with no knowledge and a big heart and that it’s their fault. Also Karen has a huge issue with pitbull/pitbull mixes. That is what I am referencing not all and any dogs.

  • WriterBry

    I’ve been attacked by five dogs total throughout my life. None of them were ever on a leash, they were all Pit Bulls. I know they say that, Pit Bulls are misunderstood. I think I understand them just fine when I see them running after me from 150 meters away just to try and bite into me. They say it’s the dog’s owners, however, if this were true, wouldn’t I have expected to have a little variety in the breeds that have attacked me over the years?

    Returning to the original point, however…
    They should tie the yellow ribbon to their tails, not their leash, because all the dogs that went after me, forgot their leash. So we got to tie the ribbon somewhere else.

    • Renee

      why did the dumbass owners not have their dogs on a leash?

    • james pogrebetsky

      First off, why are you in so many situations where you are getting bit by dogs. Let alone, only one type of dog? I’ve been bit once by a dog. And it was blind and death and died the next morning, and like an idiot, I came from behind to pet it. I’ve been around a lot of dogs. I’m 28. What are you doing wrong, that I clearly aren’t?

      • WriterBry

        I own a small dog, I walk him, and a lot of the stray dogs from the other neighborhood tend to come over to our apartment complex. Also, this is throughout my life despite the fact that the last four attacks were within the last two years. The first attack was when I was twelve, the second, I was fourteen and the owners actually thought it would be funny to sick their pit on me. I killed the dog to protect myself. Usually, all I am doing is walking my dog. Yes, I might be unlucky, but you act like me walking my dog outside my house is what the problem is by the way you ask the question. I should be allowed to walk my dog in my own neighborhood without worry that an unleashed Pit Bull is going to eat him.

  • Dokhebi

    Do they have a ribbon for “dog is overly friendly and may slobber on everyone close by?”

    • WriterBry

      You should start an awareness program :P

    • TheGrittyEdge

      and rainbow colored ribbons for male dogs that hump guys legs….

  • Renee

    I am laughing so hard reading some of these comments. The yellow ribbon thing is a good idea whether your dog is aggressive or not; it just gives people a second reminder to not suddenly approach an unknown dog. The first indication should be common sense. I never approach a dog unless the owner says it’s okay. I have a pitbull who is 7. I have raised him from a pup. I have never spanked him, only used a stern “no” while raising him. I speak to him like he is a human. He has never showed aggression to another adult, child, or animal. The only aggression I have taught his was to show aggression if a gun was pointed at him.
    I don’t feel that my dog would hurt anyone if they wanted to pet him, but he’s a dog. You never know what animals are thinking or feeling. They can’t speak. I keep very close attention to my dog while people are around and if I feel he may be nervous or anxious, I put him up. As a dog owner, I believe since we cannot completely control our dog’s actions and reactions, we need to take responsibility by doing things we can control (ie. putting a yellow ribbon on your dog, keeping your dog away if it is animal/child aggressive, or putting your dog in a different room if he/she seems to be getting grumpy).
    I’m not a dog trainer by any means, and I will never claim to be. My dog listens to me, and many of my friends. He’s well behaved, house broke, and gets along with kids and animals. I look at it this way; he’s mine, he keeps me company, and will protect me and my home if needed. He fulfills every aspect that I had in mind when I got him. He is getting less social and grumpier in his old age, but hell, I’ll probably be that way too. I don’t take him out and socialize that much anymore because he is that way. I’m sure my kids won’t take me out much when I get old and bitchy for the same reason.

    • TheGrittyEdge

      want a good laugh? hang out at the local pet store one day the “trainer” is there with a class.

      • Renee

        hahaha I’m not saying there’s no need for dog trainers, that would be a pretty sweet job. I was just fortunate enough to end up with a smart dog and a knack for training him.

  • Monica Leal

    Great idea! we need to spread the word so people will know! I need to put a yellow ribbon on my little Schipperke! She’s my little angel but needs a little time to get to know people before warming up to them.

  • Jeff Lane

    I guess if someone ties one around an old oak tree it means caution my tree might bite you.

    • Renee

      I generally try and stay away from oak tress anyway, I heard they’re the worst of all trees

  • john allen

    That’s dangerously incorrect and irresponsible, EVERYBODY knows Yellow ribbon means a loved one is away and hopefully will return soon, I would think the dogs owner is away on active duty in Afghanistan or something, you need to pick another color.

    • cris725

      seriously? simmer down.

  • Nika113

    Or maybe we can just teach our children and adults not to charge up to strange dogs like morons?

  • AndroidFileSharing

    I’m going to put one on my dogs leash just to keep people away then! Yellow ribbon or not, who says a good dog doesn’t have a mood swing and chomp some poor kids face off?

    • TheGrittyEdge

      and a yellow ribbon is all it takes? interesting. i suppose “the universe” will send every man woman and child a text message or tweet to let them know if they see the yellow ribbon to stay away, as well as notifying the millions of dog owners that probably wont see this or come across the FB page,

    • Mikster

      Wow- if a good dog might chomp a person’s face when is a bad mood, then maybe I should support banning dogs in all public areas. Keep them on your own property and keep them restrained.

  • Justin Williams

    We are here to help children realize that even they see a yellow ribbon on a dog even if they are with a babysitter to remember, be cautious. Dogs have a mind of there own and they are appt to change it at any time, children need to be aware that it’s only safe to pet a strangers dog if it is safe to be around children. Next we are all perfect even dogs, we have to do what we need to survive. Only positive intentions will give this article the noticeably real problem with children around dogs, education about dogs and there body language. The ribbon is a start.

  • james pogrebetsky

    Now lets be honest here. If a person know enough to understand what the yellow ribbon means, then they are probably going to know enough not to approach an unknown dog in the first place, with or without the ribbon. And if parents teach their kids what the yellow ribbon means, yet at the same time not teach them dogs without the ribbon might also bite, then what’s the point? Pointless fad, if you ask me. Unless the dog has a sign that says ‘ don’t approach me’, this isn’t going to be effective.

  • Kathy Heywood

    Um, this is stupid. The owner or handler should tell approaching kids and their adult “handlers” to not get near their dog. I tell people that all the time. Usually kids will ask to pet the dog. I tell them that she can be aggressive and to be gentle.

    • TheGrittyEdge

      It’s beyond stupid Kathy, bordering on down right dangerous.

  • Cynthia Stephens

    Should have chosen another color. Yellow ribbons are used for military deployment for soldiers. I saw this and immediately thought it was for the owner being in service. Bad choice personally and I am Military Mom.

  • TheGrittyEdge

    Here is an idea, just as viable as your “yellow ribbon”, how about rainbow colored ribbons for male dogs that hump guys legs………..

    • TheGrittyEdge

      I mean, seriously, it IS a problem. If you have never been leg humped you have no idea the trauma that it can bring, long term depression, shame, guilt.. we need to lobby Congress for support for the forgotten souls that have been leg humped!

    • Mikster

      ROFLMAO! Or how about the crotch sniffers that bury their nose in your crotch? Maybe I should wear a sign on my a$$ warning dog owners?

  • Melodie Beam Bowen

    I think a red ribbon would be more appropriate, Most children & adults are taught to associate the color red to a warning or danger,

  • Cindy

    Is there a ribbon color for a dog that people shouldn’t approach at all?

    • http://wildernessvagabonds.com/ Mike Lewinski

      I don’t know, but I’m thinking of some people who need such a ribbon around their necks ;)

    • Mikster

      A muzzle would be the best bet there.

  • Rusty Horton

    This is a wonderful project. Of my 5 dogs, 3 are under 20 pounds and since they get very little exposure to children, they get very nervous around children. The yellow ribbon can serve to protect the dogs AND the children, once parents are educated.
    Just for the record, my two Rotties are totally social with people of all ages, genders, and ethnicities.

  • Becca DogLover

    Some dogs are easily startled due to blindness, deafness, or cognitive problems but they still deserve to get out and about and be socialized and have the best quality of life possible. Unfortunately, I do not think this yellow ribbon idea will work because the problem is with kids who have NOT been taught not to rush at a strange dog while yelling and squealing. If a parent is not aware or not concerned about teaching their kids safe behavior, why would they be aware of or teach their kids about what yellow ribbons mean? My pet peeve is when the handler is yelling “No No NO NO” at a wild kid running at their dog and the kid totally ignores him/her. I think ribbons would be unnecessary if people exercised politeness and consideration and I doubt those who don’t know what that means would act any differently because of a yellow ribbon. All of us will be cautious if we see them, but I’d bet all of us act that way anyway if we don’t know the dog yet.

  • Elizabeth

    Dog bites accounted for more than one-third of homeowners insurance liability claims paid in 2011, costing nearly $479 million in the U.S., according to theInsurance Information Institute.

    Property casualty insurers pay out far more in claims for property damage to homes. But when it comes to liability, the cost of dog bite claims has risen 48% since 2003, even though the number of dog bites has remained roughly flat, the organization said.

    State Farm, the largest writer of homeowners insurance in the U.S., paid more than $109 million on nearly 3,800 dog bite claims in 2011.

    The Insurance Information Institute’s analysis of homeowners insurance data found that the average cost of dog bite claims in the U.S. was $29,396 in 2011, up 53.4% from $19,162 in 2004. Medical costs and the sizes of settlements, judgments and jury awards given to plaintiffs have all outpaced inflation, the organization said.

    • TheGrittyEdge

      …….and your point is?

      • Leiah Hime

        I believe her point is OBVIOUS. Avoid petting strangers’ dogs, no matter how irresistible. When it’s someone’s fault and they get bitten, it is the dog who ends up seized or worse, put down! So yellow ribbon or no ribbon, avoid petting. And teach children the same thing too.

        • TheGrittyEdge

          and you somehow managed to connect all the dog bite stats that occurred on private property to a story about yellow ribbons on dogs in public places. Bravo.

          • e-learning

            Um yeah correlation may not show causation but there is still a relationship between dog bites and the number idiots in the world. Less idiots less dog bites equals less stats about idoits with dog bites.

      • Elizabeth

        we should teach children to be careful around dogs whether they have a yellow ribbon or not and this is why!

        • TheGrittyEdge

          well, I agree with you that “we should teach children to be careful around dogs whether they have a yellow ribbon or not” . The stats pertain to dog bites that occurred on private property and therefore have little relevance to the the story. But, yeah, ribbons aren’t necessary.

  • Leiah Hime

    As cute as all dogs are, always approach with caution, yellow ribbon or no ribbon. And teach children that too. I try not to pet other people’s dogs at the park, no matter how irresistible they are ;-) let alone sit in close range with my face on their mouths. Remember that overly friendly reporter who sat infront of a pitbull petting it and thinking how nice it was? Long story short, he took a massive bite of her face and locked his jaw on it, when they got him off of her, they put him down for being “vicious.” So teach your children to never approach strangers’ dogs, that just looking is enough. Too many dogs have been put down just because of people’s stupidity.

  • http://www.dfdk9.com/ Mauser*Girl

    A friend of mine just linked this article and while I think the idea behind this is great, I think that the reality is that a yellow ribbon to mark a dog that needs space is completely and utterly pointless.

    Aside from the fact that the majority of people have never even heard of this – I’ve been in dog sports and activities for more than a decade and this is only the second time I’ve heard it mentioned. So if someone involved in dogs doesn’t know about this, the general ignorant public most certainly doesn’t know about it. I think most people would assume that they probably are showing their support for the military or have someone who’s deployed, since the yellow ribbon is usually associated with our armed forces.

    Ribbon color aside, when has a ribbon ever stopped a stranger from touching a dog? Service Dogs and SDITs (Service Dogs in Training) are commonly decked out in bright colored, reflective vests with “DO NOT PET” patches all over them. Yet every single time I have been out with a Service Dog team or encountered one in public, it’s like people are magically attracted to all the “DO NOT PET” stickers and just absolutely must stick their hands out and touch the dog. You’d figure if that doesn’t keep people away, yellow ribbons certainly won’t.

    I think handlers need to start advocating for their dogs, learn how to be situationally aware, and learn how to say “NO”. When I fostered, I frequently would walk new dogs in public kinds of spaces (park, sidewalk, etc.) and be approached by kids and adults alike. Many will run up and try to pet without asking. Some will stick down a hand in passing, again, without asking. I’ve gotten very good at spotting them before they came into my dog’s spaces, placing the dog where they couldn’t touch (or changing directions), or telling them NO, you may not pet! I’ve had parents get upset with me because I wouldn’t let their children run up to and touch an uncomfortable, scared, recent foster dog. (How stupid can people get?!)

    My biggest pet peeve is the fact that people seem to assume that because you’re in public (in a public area) with your dog, your dog is somehow public property and should be approached, touched, given treats, etc. This bugs the living daylights out of me. My dog in “public” isn’t any more public property than I am. You’re not gonna touch me when I walk down the road, are you? Are you gonna sit on the hood of my car that’s parked in a public parking lot? If your answer to both of those was no, keep your hands off my dog and teach others to do the same. If you won’t, well, at least don’t get offended when I tell you to keep your hands off my dog.

  • Strange

    Parents shouldn’t let their kids near strange dogs in the first place, nor should anyone chase someone down to pet their dog. It’s rude.

  • pineview8850

    Stupid idea. I have to get close to see it. Here’s a better idea. If your dog might bite, don’t take them out in public. If it does bite, no yellow ribbon is going to save you from the liability of a fine and lawsuit.

  • BJK

    I like the idea, just wish the ribbon was a different color – perhaps red, since that is a universal warning color. Yellow ribbons have long been associated with people who are away for some reason. But, it’s done, and it’s good to know.

  • RL

    People should teach their kids not to run up to any dog regardless of a ribbon! My kids know not to run up to dogs, and if they feel the need to pet then they have to ask permission from the owner first. Disaster averted….

    • Mikster

      I agree. But risky dogs should be muzzle din public places .

  • Lynda Lafond

    Dumb. Non dog people will juat think a yellow ribbon means the family has someone in the armed services. Dog people should be smart enough to know how to interact properly. Why not create “danger dog” vests (like the service dog vests and hunting dog vests), or use muzzles on dogs prone to snapping/biting, or something that people could actually read vs a “guess why i have a bow”?

    • Mikster

      Best response I’ve heard yet.

    • e-learning

      Thank you for bringing some common sense to this thread. This would even explain the color yellow for the vest with red writing “DANGER”. Unlike the ribbon that says hey this deployed soldiers dog wants to be petted or the dog may bite you.

  • waynefromnscanada

    Always amazes me how almost any story on dogs brings the extremist “pittie” apoligists out of the woodwork to fight about their “nanny dogs”. I love the one about “pitties” being fine as long as they don’t have to defend themselves. Hahahahaha

  • Marky de Sade

    Yes lets put a beautiful coloured ribbon on a potentially dangerous animal that will keep the kids away from it.

    Great idea

  • Cynthia Jameson

    If your dog has any issues it should not be out in a public park! Leave it at home and play with it in your own back yard..

    • TheGrittyEdge

      Finally! Judging by yours and the previous few posts the common sense cavalry is here.. I can take a break.

    • captainthecapn

      Umm. Yeah, my backyard is part of the apartment complex I live in which has children in it. There’s nothing wrong with kids being told to stay away from a dog.

      • Mikster

        Why would you keep a pet that needs a yard in an apartment? Everyone is not entitled to them.

        • captainthecapn

          Uh, maybe because I moved there after I got the dog? Maybe because the shelter never told me that the dog might have issues with children? Maybe because the dog is aging, and as her body starts to develop more aches and pains, she’s not as friendly to frisky children? Maybe because parents should tell their damn kids to not approach strange dogs? If your child is bitten by a dog, it’s bad parenting- not bad pet ownership.

          • Mikster

            Then -[perhaps it would have been in the dog’s best interests to have been re-homed instead of stuck in an apartment. And don’t worry= my kids have always been told and kept their distance from dogs. In fact, none really care much to pet them at all. So IF they are ever bitten, I assure you, it would not have been due to them not being brought up correctly with respect to animals. I still don’t know why others need to accommodate an unfriendly animal in public on the grounds s that its owner doesn’t have an adequate yard in which to exercise them? No, you are not entitled to a pet just because you want one, and if your circumstances change and you can’t give it a good home while not inflicting unnecessary risks on the public at large, you don’t deserve it either. And the dog doesn’t deserve it either.

          • Dagummit

            Any dog can live in an apartment so long as it’s exercise requirements are met. When my Smooth Collie (a 63 lb working breed) was 7 years old, I got married and moved into an apartment. Why didn’t I rehome my dog? Because my dwelling, no matter the size, is NOT for exercise. It is for living in. We had a backyard but it was teeny tiny and just turning a dog out into a yard does NOT mean the dog is going to exercise itself. Proper exercise comes from actually interacting with your dog by walking it, hiking with it, taking it somewhere secure and throwing the ball for it, etc.

            Shortly after we moved into that apartment, we bought a Bluetick Coonhound puppy. Anyone that knows coonhounds knows that they are Energizer Bunnies. Again, a large working breed that ended up about 70 lbs. We had two large breed working dogs in an apartment. However, neither was suffering. The hounds was taught not to howl excessively just like any other dog should be taught and all of our neighbors fawned over the both of them. By the time we moved, we had three large dogs in that apartment with the third one being my youngest and highest energy, a hairless, Standard Xoloitzcuintli.

            Because I made sure they got the exercise they needed, they all happily lived in an apartment and, frankly, were MUCH happier than other dogs I know who live in a huge house with a huge yard because we didn’t just expect them to exercise and entertain themselves. Last year we moved into our current place. It’s an actual HOUSE but it is probably half the size or less of our apartment. What you live in does not matter one bit. What matters is whether you give your dogs the outlet they need to run and play and be dogs. It doesn’t have to be in your backyard.

  • Missy

    This seems dangerous to me. If children learn that only dogs with yellow ribbons should be approached with caution, they will be more likely to run up to any dog without a ribbon thinking that dog is safe. ALL STRANGE dogs should be approached with caution. Not fear, just caution. That’s the way I was taught from the time I was a child.

  • Guest

    I have both a pit bull and a Chihuahua both very sweet but my Chihuahua would be the first to bite if provoked

  • Lisa

    I just taught my children the same as my parents taught me: never approach or try to pet a dog unless you get permission from the dog’s owner/Mom/Dad/walker/handler.

  • Cody Wallis

    I just hope this concept has been thoroughly tested—if you ask me a yellow ribbon doesn’t communicate potential danger. I initially saw it as an accessory—one that might inadvertently make the dog appear more approachable. That seems like the opposite of the goal here. And children, more than anyone, need a symbol to which they will have an instinctual response.

  • Heather_Habilatory

    You should teach your children that ALL DOGS are to be approached with caution.

    • Mikster

      That is very true. and all dogs that are unreliable should wear muzzles, not yellow ribbons if they are in public areas shared with human beings. (And before you say it, I’d support muzzles and strait jackets fro some kids as well)

      • e-learning

        I like your idea. Maybe Yellow muzzles so theres no confusion or danger.

  • Wayne Ratliff

    I thought it had something to do with waiting for the Cavalry to come back. I saw t his John Wayne movie once and heard the song, “Around her leash, she wore a yellow ribbon . . .” Or something like that.

    • Lisa

      I actually thought that’s what it was before I went to the article. I thought they were animals waiting for their Person to come back from the sandbox. There is a program within the military to host dogs while the owner is deployed.

  • Brenda M53

    Would the yellow ribbon be appropriate for a newly blink dog?

  • Wes Rovella

    is there a reason we have to use yellow? now I dont know if my dog is a possible danger to children… or a war vet

  • Joseph Mauro

    this is the stupidest thing i have ever read, i love dogs. i have had loving family rescue dogs that needed a muzzle around “wheels, homeless people and anyone drinking, men with hoods etc.” a yellow ribbon is stupid. like putting a balloon on an electric fence as a warning.

  • Albathar

    What a nice idea!

  • Karen Whalen

    i’m surprised they would use yellow – that would make me think the dog belonged to a soldier and was waiting for him to come home. thanks for sharing.

  • Mary Otoole

    i have a 5 year old beagle she has never had puppies is she to old now

  • Lee Skipper

    Not my responsibility to know how to act around your dangerous animal. If it can possibly attack you should not be out in public with a dog that is not properly socialized and trained.

  • Mindy James

    Great idea but until knowledge of it is widespread, pretty ineffective. All owners should keep this in mind and not rely on the “general public” to be aware of the meaning of a yellow ribbon. People can’t seem to teach their children (or themselves, for that matter) proper dog etiquette as it is, so not sure how a colored ribbon will help them.

  • Jerrie Hayley Klenk

    It could also be a working dog in training..

  • Redeemed

    I thought it meant the dog supported our troops …. :)

  • Debbie Lassila Wells

    Wow, this discussion wen from teaching people about the yellow ribbon, which I think is an excellent idea, to attacking each other over beliefs about Pits.

  • Mike P

    If my dane sees people or other dogs I feel that they should bw the ones wearing the ribbon. Brady doesnt realize NOT every person or dog wants to play. Haha

  • Kimberly Norkooli

    I wrote this for Karen, but decided to post this here as well! ALL DOGS can BITE, ALL Dogs can KILL, all CATS can BITE.. all CATS can KILL…. ALL ANIMALS have the ability to BITE AND KILL… I do not care how small or how big. All Animals have the ability to become over stressed and SNAP… ALL animals have the ability to do just about ANYTHING to any other human or animal. Even the most domesticated animal can snap… rather from prior abuse, the way someone rasied the animal, a mental issue, over stressed… FUNNY… HUMANS CAN TOO! In all honesty no animal or human can be 100% trusted. The best one can do is if the animal is NOT yours… keep a decent distence… if the animal is yours… make sure you take safety pre-causions such as lesh, leads, muzzle would be ideal on dogs when out for walks. All animal ownders should have some type of fenced in yard incase a lead breaks or someone fails to shut a down fast enough. What I am getting at is BREED TYPE have NOTHING to do with how mean a dog can be or cat or any animal. True, I do agree to a point it depends on how the animal is taken care of and treated, but again care should ALWAYS be taken by BOTH the animal owner and the PERSON who doesn’t own the animal. Kids should be taught to NEVER approuch ANY animal…. and when passing someone WALKING their pet… to always keep a safe distence away. I feel most attacks happen because BOTH PARTIES failed to take control of the situation. If a child is hurt by an animal it is because the CHILD was NOT TAUGHT to stay away from ANIMALS that are not their own pets… and the OWNER FAILED to make sure that the pet was under their control while out and about. DO I FEEL PUTTING AN ANIMAL TO DEATH is the RIGHT action when an attack does happen… HELL NO!!!! Unless the animal has proven to attack more then once and the attacks being so bad that it required someone to go to the hospital!! Then maybe! I think each situation is different… sometimes I feel what should happen is the animal taken away from the owner… Placed is some type of foster situation until someone is willing to take on that animal and care for it the correct way. I also feel what should be taken in serious consideration is WHAT the OTHER PARTY DID to get attacked. Most animals get stressed out and scared when a little kid comes screaming and yelling right at them. AND NO, NO MATTER HOW IN CONTROL YOU ARE in caring and training that animal… FIGHT OR FLIGHT kicks in just as it does a human being. I LOVE animals… I own 2 cats and a sugar glider… in the past I have had two dogs and other cats.,.. Ginny Pigs, hamsters, fish, birds, etc… So I am far from an animal hater. I feel most animals are good and will always be that way.. same as humans… but their can be a bad apple (for whatever reason) and they just need extra care.

  • jeremiah dawson

    We always needed a special ribbons system to point dangerous things and or creatures for all society to know and fear upon approach. Like my ex-wife for instance. She needs some kind of warning label. I asked Santa for a Ribbon but all i got back was a Happy Hanukkah card in the mail.

  • disqus_V95QhuC1Kx

    As I am reading all these comments, I get more and more confused. If one human does a bad thing, does that make us all bad? No. I agree, that if a pit attacks, they do A LOT of damage, but if it weren’t for the media, then these animals would not be considered blood thirsty killing machines. All animals can bite and hurt people. That being said, I find it RIDICULOUS when people try and prove that pit bulls are horrible dogs, because they are not. There are millions of dog bites a year, are they all pits? No. Are the stories that are shared about Pits?? Absolutely. I can respect a person who can say they are not comfortable with what a pit CAN do, but what I don’t respect is when people say what a pit WILL do. Probably made no sense, ut I have so many thoughts running through head about this issue.

  • jeremiah dawson

    nobody cares what you dum dum’s think about pit bulls. Go post that nonsense on Facebook where your friends who also dont care what you think can read your journals about how pit bulls make you feel

  • Beth H

    My pom is over hyper. He can sense evil, or he just hates my downstairs neighbors (I think she’s evil) either way she gets too close and my boy who rules the roost feels he must protect me. He is learning however that I rule and he can relax. I was never a big fan of “pinch collars” on dogs, I sent my boy to doggy boot camp and they use them. Once they explained how they work I think they are an excellent way to train a dog. And a yellow ribbon is a great harmless away to say approach with cation and ask permission. I love all dogs, pits, rots, dobers whatevs. They all are good unless raised otherwise.